Sherpa Tenzing Norgay's Inspiring Tale at Himalayan Mountaineering Institute, Darjeeling




When people think of mountaineers, it is usually the big names that are discussed. When people talk about peaks such as Mount Everest and Kanchendzunga, names of the support staff, such as the sherpas, go unnoticed. One exception to this, and a trendsetter too, was Tenzing Norgay.  Tenzing Norgay mentioned that he was born Namgyal Wangdi in Khumbu, Nepal on 29 May 1914. Though according to some later accounts, he was born in Tibet and ran away to Nepal to work for a Sherpa family when he was still very young. In fact this was only one of the two times when young Namgyal Wangdi ran away from home. The second time he ran away was to Darjeeling in India. It was here that he discovered the profession that was to make him one of the 100 most influential people of 20th century according to the Time magazine.     At the age of 39, on 29 May 1953, Sherpa Tenzing became one of the two people to scale Mount Everest. He had accompanied Edmund Hillary to the summit. He was well recognized for this feat within India as well as abroad. During this expedition, Hillary had a very close brush with death when he fell into a crevasse. At this time, Sherpa Tenzing showed great presence of mind by using his ice axe to secure the rope just in time.      For this success, Sherpa Tenzing was awarded the George Medal by Queen Elizabeth II. His partners were knighted. Tenzing also earned accolades in Nepal and in India. It was this same Tenzing Norgay, who went on to become the first Director of the Himalayan Mountaineering Institute when the institute was set up in 1954.   In fact it was Tenzing Norgay's successful climb of Mount Everest that led to the momentum that led to the creation of the Institute in the year 1954. It was initially located at Roy Villa at Lebong Cart Road and was shifted to the current location in 1958. It is currently located on a serene hill right next to the Dalhousie zoo. The kanchendzunga can also be viewed from here, though we weren't lucky enough to get that view.     Along with the Institute there is a museum too that is an interesting place to visit. Here you can see the dresses that were worn during various exhibitions and look at the tools and techniques that the mountaineers use while climbing. At the museum, you can also buy mementos such as a swiss knife or a small torch.  You will find tourists of all age groups roaming around the grounds. Many of them flow in from the Zoo nearby, but there are many who come here to see the institute because it has become a very popular tourist attraction in its own right. The apt and motivating quotation "May you climb from peak to peak" greets the visitors and sets the expectations for the visit.  It was the first Prime Minister of India, Pt Jawaharlal Nehru who laid the foundation stone of the Himalayan Mountaineering Institute. The date was November 4th, 1954. The stone can still be seen here. Also the statue of the mountaineer Tenzing Norgay and other mountaineers.  The Himalayan Mountaineering Institute offers several Mountaineering courses to enthusiasts. It is thanks to such initiatives that adventure sports are not only becoming popular, but also a viable career choice for those so inclined. As far as sports are concerned, the society continues to evolve and though there is a long way to go, we must not forget to thank pioneers such as the sherpas who have made mountaineering possible in the Himalayas.

When people think of mountaineers, it is usually the big names that are discussed. When people talk about peaks such as Mount Everest and Kanchendzunga, names of the support staff, such as the sherpas, go unnoticed. One exception to this, and a trendsetter too, was Tenzing Norgay. 

Tenzing Norgay mentioned that he was born Namgyal Wangdi in Khumbu, Nepal on 29 May 1914. Though according to some later accounts, he was born in Tibet and ran away to Nepal to work for a Sherpa family when he was still very young. In fact this was only one of the two times when young Namgyal Wangdi ran away from home. The second time he ran away was to Darjeeling in India. It was here that he discovered the profession that was to make him one of the 100 most influential people of 20th century according to the Time magazine.


At the age of 39, on 29 May 1953, Sherpa Tenzing became one of the two people to scale Mount Everest. He had accompanied Edmund Hillary to the summit. He was well recognized for this feat within India as well as abroad. During this expedition, Hillary had a very close brush with death when he fell into a crevasse. At this time, Sherpa Tenzing showed great presence of mind by using his ice axe to secure the rope just in time. 

For this success, Sherpa Tenzing was awarded the George Medal by Queen Elizabeth II. His partners were knighted. Tenzing also earned accolades in Nepal and in India. It was this same Tenzing Norgay, who went on to become the first Director of the Himalayan Mountaineering Institute when the institute was set up in 1954. 



When people think of mountaineers, it is usually the big names that are discussed. When people talk about peaks such as Mount Everest and Kanchendzunga, names of the support staff, such as the sherpas, go unnoticed. One exception to this, and a trendsetter too, was Tenzing Norgay.  Tenzing Norgay mentioned that he was born Namgyal Wangdi in Khumbu, Nepal on 29 May 1914. Though according to some later accounts, he was born in Tibet and ran away to Nepal to work for a Sherpa family when he was still very young. In fact this was only one of the two times when young Namgyal Wangdi ran away from home. The second time he ran away was to Darjeeling in India. It was here that he discovered the profession that was to make him one of the 100 most influential people of 20th century according to the Time magazine.     At the age of 39, on 29 May 1953, Sherpa Tenzing became one of the two people to scale Mount Everest. He had accompanied Edmund Hillary to the summit. He was well recognized for this feat within India as well as abroad. During this expedition, Hillary had a very close brush with death when he fell into a crevasse. At this time, Sherpa Tenzing showed great presence of mind by using his ice axe to secure the rope just in time.      For this success, Sherpa Tenzing was awarded the George Medal by Queen Elizabeth II. His partners were knighted. Tenzing also earned accolades in Nepal and in India. It was this same Tenzing Norgay, who went on to become the first Director of the Himalayan Mountaineering Institute when the institute was set up in 1954.   In fact it was Tenzing Norgay's successful climb of Mount Everest that led to the momentum that led to the creation of the Institute in the year 1954. It was initially located at Roy Villa at Lebong Cart Road and was shifted to the current location in 1958. It is currently located on a serene hill right next to the Dalhousie zoo. The kanchendzunga can also be viewed from here, though we weren't lucky enough to get that view.     Along with the Institute there is a museum too that is an interesting place to visit. Here you can see the dresses that were worn during various exhibitions and look at the tools and techniques that the mountaineers use while climbing. At the museum, you can also buy mementos such as a swiss knife or a small torch.  You will find tourists of all age groups roaming around the grounds. Many of them flow in from the Zoo nearby, but there are many who come here to see the institute because it has become a very popular tourist attraction in its own right. The apt and motivating quotation "May you climb from peak to peak" greets the visitors and sets the expectations for the visit.  It was the first Prime Minister of India, Pt Jawaharlal Nehru who laid the foundation stone of the Himalayan Mountaineering Institute. The date was November 4th, 1954. The stone can still be seen here. Also the statue of the mountaineer Tenzing Norgay and other mountaineers.  The Himalayan Mountaineering Institute offers several Mountaineering courses to enthusiasts. It is thanks to such initiatives that adventure sports are not only becoming popular, but also a viable career choice for those so inclined. As far as sports are concerned, the society continues to evolve and though there is a long way to go, we must not forget to thank pioneers such as the sherpas who have made mountaineering possible in the Himalayas.

In fact it was Tenzing Norgay's successful climb of Mount Everest that led to the momentum that led to the creation of the Institute in the year 1954. It was initially located at Roy Villa at Lebong Cart Road and was shifted to the current location in 1958. It is currently located on a serene hill right next to the Dalhousie zoo. The kanchendzunga can also be viewed from here, though we weren't lucky enough to get that view.

Along with the Institute there is a museum too that is an interesting place to visit. Here you can see the dresses that were worn during various exhibitions and look at the tools and techniques that the mountaineers use while climbing. At the museum, you can also buy mementos such as a swiss knife or a small torch.

When people think of mountaineers, it is usually the big names that are discussed. When people talk about peaks such as Mount Everest and Kanchendzunga, names of the support staff, such as the sherpas, go unnoticed. One exception to this, and a trendsetter too, was Tenzing Norgay.  Tenzing Norgay mentioned that he was born Namgyal Wangdi in Khumbu, Nepal on 29 May 1914. Though according to some later accounts, he was born in Tibet and ran away to Nepal to work for a Sherpa family when he was still very young. In fact this was only one of the two times when young Namgyal Wangdi ran away from home. The second time he ran away was to Darjeeling in India. It was here that he discovered the profession that was to make him one of the 100 most influential people of 20th century according to the Time magazine.     At the age of 39, on 29 May 1953, Sherpa Tenzing became one of the two people to scale Mount Everest. He had accompanied Edmund Hillary to the summit. He was well recognized for this feat within India as well as abroad. During this expedition, Hillary had a very close brush with death when he fell into a crevasse. At this time, Sherpa Tenzing showed great presence of mind by using his ice axe to secure the rope just in time.      For this success, Sherpa Tenzing was awarded the George Medal by Queen Elizabeth II. His partners were knighted. Tenzing also earned accolades in Nepal and in India. It was this same Tenzing Norgay, who went on to become the first Director of the Himalayan Mountaineering Institute when the institute was set up in 1954.   In fact it was Tenzing Norgay's successful climb of Mount Everest that led to the momentum that led to the creation of the Institute in the year 1954. It was initially located at Roy Villa at Lebong Cart Road and was shifted to the current location in 1958. It is currently located on a serene hill right next to the Dalhousie zoo. The kanchendzunga can also be viewed from here, though we weren't lucky enough to get that view.     Along with the Institute there is a museum too that is an interesting place to visit. Here you can see the dresses that were worn during various exhibitions and look at the tools and techniques that the mountaineers use while climbing. At the museum, you can also buy mementos such as a swiss knife or a small torch.  You will find tourists of all age groups roaming around the grounds. Many of them flow in from the Zoo nearby, but there are many who come here to see the institute because it has become a very popular tourist attraction in its own right. The apt and motivating quotation "May you climb from peak to peak" greets the visitors and sets the expectations for the visit.  It was the first Prime Minister of India, Pt Jawaharlal Nehru who laid the foundation stone of the Himalayan Mountaineering Institute. The date was November 4th, 1954. The stone can still be seen here. Also the statue of the mountaineer Tenzing Norgay and other mountaineers.  The Himalayan Mountaineering Institute offers several Mountaineering courses to enthusiasts. It is thanks to such initiatives that adventure sports are not only becoming popular, but also a viable career choice for those so inclined. As far as sports are concerned, the society continues to evolve and though there is a long way to go, we must not forget to thank pioneers such as the sherpas who have made mountaineering possible in the Himalayas.

You will find tourists of all age groups roaming around the grounds. Many of them flow in from the Zoo nearby, but there are many who come here to see the institute because it has become a very popular tourist attraction in its own right. The apt and motivating quotation "May you climb from peak to peak" greets the visitors and sets the expectations for the visit.

When people think of mountaineers, it is usually the big names that are discussed. When people talk about peaks such as Mount Everest and Kanchendzunga, names of the support staff, such as the sherpas, go unnoticed. One exception to this, and a trendsetter too, was Tenzing Norgay.  Tenzing Norgay mentioned that he was born Namgyal Wangdi in Khumbu, Nepal on 29 May 1914. Though according to some later accounts, he was born in Tibet and ran away to Nepal to work for a Sherpa family when he was still very young. In fact this was only one of the two times when young Namgyal Wangdi ran away from home. The second time he ran away was to Darjeeling in India. It was here that he discovered the profession that was to make him one of the 100 most influential people of 20th century according to the Time magazine.     At the age of 39, on 29 May 1953, Sherpa Tenzing became one of the two people to scale Mount Everest. He had accompanied Edmund Hillary to the summit. He was well recognized for this feat within India as well as abroad. During this expedition, Hillary had a very close brush with death when he fell into a crevasse. At this time, Sherpa Tenzing showed great presence of mind by using his ice axe to secure the rope just in time.      For this success, Sherpa Tenzing was awarded the George Medal by Queen Elizabeth II. His partners were knighted. Tenzing also earned accolades in Nepal and in India. It was this same Tenzing Norgay, who went on to become the first Director of the Himalayan Mountaineering Institute when the institute was set up in 1954.   In fact it was Tenzing Norgay's successful climb of Mount Everest that led to the momentum that led to the creation of the Institute in the year 1954. It was initially located at Roy Villa at Lebong Cart Road and was shifted to the current location in 1958. It is currently located on a serene hill right next to the Dalhousie zoo. The kanchendzunga can also be viewed from here, though we weren't lucky enough to get that view.     Along with the Institute there is a museum too that is an interesting place to visit. Here you can see the dresses that were worn during various exhibitions and look at the tools and techniques that the mountaineers use while climbing. At the museum, you can also buy mementos such as a swiss knife or a small torch.  You will find tourists of all age groups roaming around the grounds. Many of them flow in from the Zoo nearby, but there are many who come here to see the institute because it has become a very popular tourist attraction in its own right. The apt and motivating quotation "May you climb from peak to peak" greets the visitors and sets the expectations for the visit.  It was the first Prime Minister of India, Pt Jawaharlal Nehru who laid the foundation stone of the Himalayan Mountaineering Institute. The date was November 4th, 1954. The stone can still be seen here. Also the statue of the mountaineer Tenzing Norgay and other mountaineers.  The Himalayan Mountaineering Institute offers several Mountaineering courses to enthusiasts. It is thanks to such initiatives that adventure sports are not only becoming popular, but also a viable career choice for those so inclined. As far as sports are concerned, the society continues to evolve and though there is a long way to go, we must not forget to thank pioneers such as the sherpas who have made mountaineering possible in the Himalayas.

It was the first Prime Minister of India, Pt Jawaharlal Nehru who laid the foundation stone of the Himalayan Mountaineering Institute. The date was November 4th, 1954. The stone can still be seen here. Also the statue of the mountaineer Tenzing Norgay and other mountaineers.


When people think of mountaineers, it is usually the big names that are discussed. When people talk about peaks such as Mount Everest and Kanchendzunga, names of the support staff, such as the sherpas, go unnoticed. One exception to this, and a trendsetter too, was Tenzing Norgay.  Tenzing Norgay mentioned that he was born Namgyal Wangdi in Khumbu, Nepal on 29 May 1914. Though according to some later accounts, he was born in Tibet and ran away to Nepal to work for a Sherpa family when he was still very young. In fact this was only one of the two times when young Namgyal Wangdi ran away from home. The second time he ran away was to Darjeeling in India. It was here that he discovered the profession that was to make him one of the 100 most influential people of 20th century according to the Time magazine.     At the age of 39, on 29 May 1953, Sherpa Tenzing became one of the two people to scale Mount Everest. He had accompanied Edmund Hillary to the summit. He was well recognized for this feat within India as well as abroad. During this expedition, Hillary had a very close brush with death when he fell into a crevasse. At this time, Sherpa Tenzing showed great presence of mind by using his ice axe to secure the rope just in time.      For this success, Sherpa Tenzing was awarded the George Medal by Queen Elizabeth II. His partners were knighted. Tenzing also earned accolades in Nepal and in India. It was this same Tenzing Norgay, who went on to become the first Director of the Himalayan Mountaineering Institute when the institute was set up in 1954.   In fact it was Tenzing Norgay's successful climb of Mount Everest that led to the momentum that led to the creation of the Institute in the year 1954. It was initially located at Roy Villa at Lebong Cart Road and was shifted to the current location in 1958. It is currently located on a serene hill right next to the Dalhousie zoo. The kanchendzunga can also be viewed from here, though we weren't lucky enough to get that view.     Along with the Institute there is a museum too that is an interesting place to visit. Here you can see the dresses that were worn during various exhibitions and look at the tools and techniques that the mountaineers use while climbing. At the museum, you can also buy mementos such as a swiss knife or a small torch.  You will find tourists of all age groups roaming around the grounds. Many of them flow in from the Zoo nearby, but there are many who come here to see the institute because it has become a very popular tourist attraction in its own right. The apt and motivating quotation "May you climb from peak to peak" greets the visitors and sets the expectations for the visit.  It was the first Prime Minister of India, Pt Jawaharlal Nehru who laid the foundation stone of the Himalayan Mountaineering Institute. The date was November 4th, 1954. The stone can still be seen here. Also the statue of the mountaineer Tenzing Norgay and other mountaineers.  The Himalayan Mountaineering Institute offers several Mountaineering courses to enthusiasts. It is thanks to such initiatives that adventure sports are not only becoming popular, but also a viable career choice for those so inclined. As far as sports are concerned, the society continues to evolve and though there is a long way to go, we must not forget to thank pioneers such as the sherpas who have made mountaineering possible in the Himalayas.

The Himalayan Mountaineering Institute offers several Mountaineering courses to enthusiasts. It is thanks to such initiatives that adventure sports are not only becoming popular, but also a viable career choice for those so inclined. As far as sports are concerned, the society continues to evolve and though there is a long way to go, we must not forget to thank pioneers such as the sherpas who have made mountaineering possible in the Himalayas.


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