Tiger Conservation - Not Just About Tigers

Tigers live in the jungle. Any two year old can tell you that. But the two year old will probably not know how close we had come to not having any tigers in our jungles. In 2008 we had only about 1400 individuals in the wild. Since then, because of various conservation efforts, the population has shown and increase and stands at 2226 as per the 2014 survey. Though this is a good sign, we still have a long way to go. While the government is taking steps in this direction, we, the common public, can do a great deal too.I have given it a fair amount of thought and at first I thought that the only thing we can do is pray, but as I went on wildlife safaris and read more about Tigers, I realized that there are some little steps each of us can take that will go a long way:1) Treat wildlife with respect when you go for safaris - I have been to several wildlife safaris and during some of them I was horrified to see the behaviour of the tourists, as well as, in some cases, of the tour operators. They drive up too close to the animals and make a lot of noise. They forget that jungles are actually homes of these creatures and we are just guests, and that too uninvited. We need to give these animals their privacy. Tigers in general are the centre of attraction in most of these safaris, and as soon as a tiger is sighted, every jeep in the vicinity heads to the place where it has been sighted. Imagine yourself in place of the tiger. You are out for an afternoon siesta and suddenly you find yourself surrounded by 10-12 metallic giants with about 9 humans in each. You want to have nothing to do with these humans and you keep your distance, but these metallic giants keep inching closer, until you aren't comfortable anymore.The end result of such a situation will probably be another T-24 (the infamous tiger of Ranthambore that was recently confined after it killed a forest guard, its fourth human victim). As the distance between humans and tigers is compromised, several issues emerge. Tigers lose the fear of humans, and with that the chances of human-animal conflict increase.So when we go on safaris, we should be mindful of this fact and not tolerate any unruly behavior on the part of our fellow travellers or the staff manning the tour vehicles.2) Understand and accept the fact that this planet belongs as much to the tigers as it does to us - By now I think everyone is clear that we aren't God’s gift to the planet Earth. We are inconsiderate looters who have been draining the planet of its resources. We have failed to respect nature and the natural order of things. And by this measure, almost all other species are superior to us. All creatures except Humans live in complete harmony with nature. So in fact they deserve the planet more than us. So when a man jumps into a tiger enclosure despite all fences and barricades and the tiger kills him when the public starts throwing rocks at the animal, don't ask irrelevant questions like "Why didn't they shoot the tiger? Human life ko koi value nahi hai kya?" You may not like the answer. Today, a tiger's life is indeed more precious than a human beings.Believe this truth and go be an advocate for the tigers. Spread the word. No human disease is worth curing if the cure requires killing of a tiger. Speak against people who propagate such beliefs.3) Invest some time and energy and spend some time doing tiger safaris. This will not only fund the conservation efforts it will also enable you to write/speak about Tigers and their conservation with much more authority. Write about tigers, share heartwarming stories about tigers and their cubs. Move your readers and inspire them to take part in campaigns such as #AircelSaveOurTigers. Create an army of people who love tigers and inspire them to further inspire other people. Let us become a nation of people who love wild tigers. And most importantly never stop teaching your children that tigers live in the jungle - because tigers will exist as long as the world has a few people who believe that tigers should live in the jungle. Help contribute to this pool of people. #AircelSaveOurTigers.


"Tigers live in the jungle." Any two year old can tell you that. But the two year old will probably not know how close we had come to not having any tigers in our jungles. In 2008 we had only about 1400 individuals in the wild. Since then, because of various conservation efforts, the population has shown an increase and stands at 2226 as per the 2014 survey. Though this is a good sign, we still have a long way to go. 

In ancient times, humans truly believed that they were the center of the Universe. To their eyes it seemed that the sun and the moon revolve around the Earth. While such theories were challenged and disproved ages ago, at the subconscious level, we still believe that the world revolves around us and our needs. So we tend to judge the value of a species just by its immediate impact on us. Since killing a tiger doesn't have a direct impact on us, we tend to look the other way. 

However, nothing can be farther from the truth. The death of a tiger does have an impact on us. Tiger is the apex predator in a jungle. In fact it is the only natural predator capable of keeping the populations of large antelopes and deer, such as Nilgai and Sambhar, in check. This was proved by the fact that as the populations of tiger plummeted, Nilgais proliferated and now they have been branded as "vermin". And with the unexpected rise in the population of herbivores, the pressure on trees and vegetation increases. You can probably guess where this is headed. 

Tiger conservation, or for that matter, conservation of any species, requires a shift in mindset. Otherwise, we are just treating the symptoms, not the disease. Extinction of species because of human interference is not the disease, it is the symptom of a much deeper problem - our tendency to take nature for granted and not look at the broader picture or the long-term impact of anything. 

While the government is taking steps in this direction, we, the common public, can do a great deal too. But first we need to realize that it is us who need to change.

Following are some of my suggestions:
Tigers live in the jungle. Any two year old can tell you that. But the two year old will probably not know how close we had come to not having any tigers in our jungles. In 2008 we had only about 1400 individuals in the wild. Since then, because of various conservation efforts, the population has shown and increase and stands at 2226 as per the 2014 survey. Though this is a good sign, we still have a long way to go. While the government is taking steps in this direction, we, the common public, can do a great deal too.I have given it a fair amount of thought and at first I thought that the only thing we can do is pray, but as I went on wildlife safaris and read more about Tigers, I realized that there are some little steps each of us can take that will go a long way:1) Treat wildlife with respect when you go for safaris - I have been to several wildlife safaris and during some of them I was horrified to see the behaviour of the tourists, as well as, in some cases, of the tour operators. They drive up too close to the animals and make a lot of noise. They forget that jungles are actually homes of these creatures and we are just guests, and that too uninvited. We need to give these animals their privacy. Tigers in general are the centre of attraction in most of these safaris, and as soon as a tiger is sighted, every jeep in the vicinity heads to the place where it has been sighted. Imagine yourself in place of the tiger. You are out for an afternoon siesta and suddenly you find yourself surrounded by 10-12 metallic giants with about 9 humans in each. You want to have nothing to do with these humans and you keep your distance, but these metallic giants keep inching closer, until you aren't comfortable anymore.The end result of such a situation will probably be another T-24 (the infamous tiger of Ranthambore that was recently confined after it killed a forest guard, its fourth human victim). As the distance between humans and tigers is compromised, several issues emerge. Tigers lose the fear of humans, and with that the chances of human-animal conflict increase.So when we go on safaris, we should be mindful of this fact and not tolerate any unruly behavior on the part of our fellow travellers or the staff manning the tour vehicles.2) Understand and accept the fact that this planet belongs as much to the tigers as it does to us - By now I think everyone is clear that we aren't God’s gift to the planet Earth. We are inconsiderate looters who have been draining the planet of its resources. We have failed to respect nature and the natural order of things. And by this measure, almost all other species are superior to us. All creatures except Humans live in complete harmony with nature. So in fact they deserve the planet more than us. So when a man jumps into a tiger enclosure despite all fences and barricades and the tiger kills him when the public starts throwing rocks at the animal, don't ask irrelevant questions like "Why didn't they shoot the tiger? Human life ko koi value nahi hai kya?" You may not like the answer. Today, a tiger's life is indeed more precious than a human beings.Believe this truth and go be an advocate for the tigers. Spread the word. No human disease is worth curing if the cure requires killing of a tiger. Speak against people who propagate such beliefs.3) Invest some time and energy and spend some time doing tiger safaris. This will not only fund the conservation efforts it will also enable you to write/speak about Tigers and their conservation with much more authority. Write about tigers, share heartwarming stories about tigers and their cubs. Move your readers and inspire them to take part in campaigns such as #AircelSaveOurTigers. Create an army of people who love tigers and inspire them to further inspire other people. Let us become a nation of people who love wild tigers. And most importantly never stop teaching your children that tigers live in the jungle - because tigers will exist as long as the world has a few people who believe that tigers should live in the jungle. Help contribute to this pool of people. #AircelSaveOurTigers.

1) Treat wildlife with respect when you go for safaris - I have been to several wildlife safaris and during some of them I was horrified to see the behavior of the tourists, as well as, in some cases, of the tour operators. They drive up too close to the animals and make a lot of noise. They forget that jungles are actually homes of these creatures and we are just guests, and uninvited at that. We need to give these animals their privacy. Tigers in general are the center of attraction in most of these safaris, and as soon as a tiger is sighted, every jeep in the vicinity heads to the place. 

Imagine yourself in a tiger's metaphorical shoes. You are out for an afternoon siesta and suddenly you find yourself surrounded by 10-12 metallic giants with a crowd of humans in each. You want to have nothing to do with these humans and you keep your distance, but these metallic giants keep inching closer, until you aren't comfortable anymore.

The end result of such a situation will probably be another T-24 (the infamous tiger of Ranthambore that was recently confined after it killed a forest guard, its fourth human victim). As the distance between humans and tigers is compromised, several issues emerge. Tigers lose the fear of humans, and with that the chances of human-animal conflict increase.

Tigers live in the jungle. Any two year old can tell you that. But the two year old will probably not know how close we had come to not having any tigers in our jungles. In 2008 we had only about 1400 individuals in the wild. Since then, because of various conservation efforts, the population has shown and increase and stands at 2226 as per the 2014 survey. Though this is a good sign, we still have a long way to go. While the government is taking steps in this direction, we, the common public, can do a great deal too.I have given it a fair amount of thought and at first I thought that the only thing we can do is pray, but as I went on wildlife safaris and read more about Tigers, I realized that there are some little steps each of us can take that will go a long way:1) Treat wildlife with respect when you go for safaris - I have been to several wildlife safaris and during some of them I was horrified to see the behaviour of the tourists, as well as, in some cases, of the tour operators. They drive up too close to the animals and make a lot of noise. They forget that jungles are actually homes of these creatures and we are just guests, and that too uninvited. We need to give these animals their privacy. Tigers in general are the centre of attraction in most of these safaris, and as soon as a tiger is sighted, every jeep in the vicinity heads to the place where it has been sighted. Imagine yourself in place of the tiger. You are out for an afternoon siesta and suddenly you find yourself surrounded by 10-12 metallic giants with about 9 humans in each. You want to have nothing to do with these humans and you keep your distance, but these metallic giants keep inching closer, until you aren't comfortable anymore.The end result of such a situation will probably be another T-24 (the infamous tiger of Ranthambore that was recently confined after it killed a forest guard, its fourth human victim). As the distance between humans and tigers is compromised, several issues emerge. Tigers lose the fear of humans, and with that the chances of human-animal conflict increase.So when we go on safaris, we should be mindful of this fact and not tolerate any unruly behavior on the part of our fellow travellers or the staff manning the tour vehicles.2) Understand and accept the fact that this planet belongs as much to the tigers as it does to us - By now I think everyone is clear that we aren't God’s gift to the planet Earth. We are inconsiderate looters who have been draining the planet of its resources. We have failed to respect nature and the natural order of things. And by this measure, almost all other species are superior to us. All creatures except Humans live in complete harmony with nature. So in fact they deserve the planet more than us. So when a man jumps into a tiger enclosure despite all fences and barricades and the tiger kills him when the public starts throwing rocks at the animal, don't ask irrelevant questions like "Why didn't they shoot the tiger? Human life ko koi value nahi hai kya?" You may not like the answer. Today, a tiger's life is indeed more precious than a human beings.Believe this truth and go be an advocate for the tigers. Spread the word. No human disease is worth curing if the cure requires killing of a tiger. Speak against people who propagate such beliefs.3) Invest some time and energy and spend some time doing tiger safaris. This will not only fund the conservation efforts it will also enable you to write/speak about Tigers and their conservation with much more authority. Write about tigers, share heartwarming stories about tigers and their cubs. Move your readers and inspire them to take part in campaigns such as #AircelSaveOurTigers. Create an army of people who love tigers and inspire them to further inspire other people. Let us become a nation of people who love wild tigers. And most importantly never stop teaching your children that tigers live in the jungle - because tigers will exist as long as the world has a few people who believe that tigers should live in the jungle. Help contribute to this pool of people. #AircelSaveOurTigers.

So when we go on safaris, we should be mindful of this fact and not tolerate any unruly behavior on the part of our fellow travellers or the staff manning the tour vehicles.

Tigers live in the jungle. Any two year old can tell you that. But the two year old will probably not know how close we had come to not having any tigers in our jungles. In 2008 we had only about 1400 individuals in the wild. Since then, because of various conservation efforts, the population has shown and increase and stands at 2226 as per the 2014 survey. Though this is a good sign, we still have a long way to go. While the government is taking steps in this direction, we, the common public, can do a great deal too.I have given it a fair amount of thought and at first I thought that the only thing we can do is pray, but as I went on wildlife safaris and read more about Tigers, I realized that there are some little steps each of us can take that will go a long way:1) Treat wildlife with respect when you go for safaris - I have been to several wildlife safaris and during some of them I was horrified to see the behaviour of the tourists, as well as, in some cases, of the tour operators. They drive up too close to the animals and make a lot of noise. They forget that jungles are actually homes of these creatures and we are just guests, and that too uninvited. We need to give these animals their privacy. Tigers in general are the centre of attraction in most of these safaris, and as soon as a tiger is sighted, every jeep in the vicinity heads to the place where it has been sighted. Imagine yourself in place of the tiger. You are out for an afternoon siesta and suddenly you find yourself surrounded by 10-12 metallic giants with about 9 humans in each. You want to have nothing to do with these humans and you keep your distance, but these metallic giants keep inching closer, until you aren't comfortable anymore.The end result of such a situation will probably be another T-24 (the infamous tiger of Ranthambore that was recently confined after it killed a forest guard, its fourth human victim). As the distance between humans and tigers is compromised, several issues emerge. Tigers lose the fear of humans, and with that the chances of human-animal conflict increase.So when we go on safaris, we should be mindful of this fact and not tolerate any unruly behavior on the part of our fellow travellers or the staff manning the tour vehicles.2) Understand and accept the fact that this planet belongs as much to the tigers as it does to us - By now I think everyone is clear that we aren't God’s gift to the planet Earth. We are inconsiderate looters who have been draining the planet of its resources. We have failed to respect nature and the natural order of things. And by this measure, almost all other species are superior to us. All creatures except Humans live in complete harmony with nature. So in fact they deserve the planet more than us. So when a man jumps into a tiger enclosure despite all fences and barricades and the tiger kills him when the public starts throwing rocks at the animal, don't ask irrelevant questions like "Why didn't they shoot the tiger? Human life ko koi value nahi hai kya?" You may not like the answer. Today, a tiger's life is indeed more precious than a human beings.Believe this truth and go be an advocate for the tigers. Spread the word. No human disease is worth curing if the cure requires killing of a tiger. Speak against people who propagate such beliefs.3) Invest some time and energy and spend some time doing tiger safaris. This will not only fund the conservation efforts it will also enable you to write/speak about Tigers and their conservation with much more authority. Write about tigers, share heartwarming stories about tigers and their cubs. Move your readers and inspire them to take part in campaigns such as #AircelSaveOurTigers. Create an army of people who love tigers and inspire them to further inspire other people. Let us become a nation of people who love wild tigers. And most importantly never stop teaching your children that tigers live in the jungle - because tigers will exist as long as the world has a few people who believe that tigers should live in the jungle. Help contribute to this pool of people. #AircelSaveOurTigers.

2) Understand and accept the fact that this planet belongs as much to other animals as it does to us - By now I think everyone understands that we human beings may claim to be the most intelligent species on the Earth, but we surely don't behave in such a way. We have behaved like inconsiderate looters who have been draining the planet of its resources, not realizing the fact that it is our very home that we are looting. We have failed to respect nature and the natural order of things. And by this measure, almost all other species are superior to us. All creatures except Humans live in complete harmony with nature. So in fact they deserve the planet more than us. So when a man jumps into a tiger enclosure despite all fences and barricades and the tiger kills him when the public starts throwing rocks at the animal, don't ask questions like "Why didn't they shoot the tiger? Human life ki koi value nahi hai kya?" You may not like the answer. Today, a tiger's life is indeed more precious than a human being's.

Believe this truth and go be an advocate for the tigers. Spread the word. No human disease is worth curing if the medicine requires killing tigers. Speak against people who propagate such beliefs.

Tigers live in the jungle. Any two year old can tell you that. But the two year old will probably not know how close we had come to not having any tigers in our jungles. In 2008 we had only about 1400 individuals in the wild. Since then, because of various conservation efforts, the population has shown and increase and stands at 2226 as per the 2014 survey. Though this is a good sign, we still have a long way to go. While the government is taking steps in this direction, we, the common public, can do a great deal too.I have given it a fair amount of thought and at first I thought that the only thing we can do is pray, but as I went on wildlife safaris and read more about Tigers, I realized that there are some little steps each of us can take that will go a long way:1) Treat wildlife with respect when you go for safaris - I have been to several wildlife safaris and during some of them I was horrified to see the behaviour of the tourists, as well as, in some cases, of the tour operators. They drive up too close to the animals and make a lot of noise. They forget that jungles are actually homes of these creatures and we are just guests, and that too uninvited. We need to give these animals their privacy. Tigers in general are the centre of attraction in most of these safaris, and as soon as a tiger is sighted, every jeep in the vicinity heads to the place where it has been sighted. Imagine yourself in place of the tiger. You are out for an afternoon siesta and suddenly you find yourself surrounded by 10-12 metallic giants with about 9 humans in each. You want to have nothing to do with these humans and you keep your distance, but these metallic giants keep inching closer, until you aren't comfortable anymore.The end result of such a situation will probably be another T-24 (the infamous tiger of Ranthambore that was recently confined after it killed a forest guard, its fourth human victim). As the distance between humans and tigers is compromised, several issues emerge. Tigers lose the fear of humans, and with that the chances of human-animal conflict increase.So when we go on safaris, we should be mindful of this fact and not tolerate any unruly behavior on the part of our fellow travellers or the staff manning the tour vehicles.2) Understand and accept the fact that this planet belongs as much to the tigers as it does to us - By now I think everyone is clear that we aren't God’s gift to the planet Earth. We are inconsiderate looters who have been draining the planet of its resources. We have failed to respect nature and the natural order of things. And by this measure, almost all other species are superior to us. All creatures except Humans live in complete harmony with nature. So in fact they deserve the planet more than us. So when a man jumps into a tiger enclosure despite all fences and barricades and the tiger kills him when the public starts throwing rocks at the animal, don't ask irrelevant questions like "Why didn't they shoot the tiger? Human life ko koi value nahi hai kya?" You may not like the answer. Today, a tiger's life is indeed more precious than a human beings.Believe this truth and go be an advocate for the tigers. Spread the word. No human disease is worth curing if the cure requires killing of a tiger. Speak against people who propagate such beliefs.3) Invest some time and energy and spend some time doing tiger safaris. This will not only fund the conservation efforts it will also enable you to write/speak about Tigers and their conservation with much more authority. Write about tigers, share heartwarming stories about tigers and their cubs. Move your readers and inspire them to take part in campaigns such as #AircelSaveOurTigers. Create an army of people who love tigers and inspire them to further inspire other people. Let us become a nation of people who love wild tigers. And most importantly never stop teaching your children that tigers live in the jungle - because tigers will exist as long as the world has a few people who believe that tigers should live in the jungle. Help contribute to this pool of people. #AircelSaveOurTigers.

3) Invest some time and energy into doing tiger safaris. This will not only fund the conservation efforts, it will also enable you to write/speak about Tigers and their conservation with much more authority. Write about tigers, share heartwarming stories about tigers and their cubs. Move your readers and inspire them to take part in campaigns such as #AircelSaveOurTigers. 

Mobile network operator Aircel, as a part of their #AircelSaveOurTigers initiative, has been working tirelessly for the cause of Tiger Conservation. They have acted as enablers for rescue teams in the zones that are prone to Human - Animal conflict. They have also been involving school children in the initiative by making them aware of the issue and by creating ambassadors out of them. We need to do something similar. Let us create an army of people who love tigers, and then inspire them to further inspire other people. Let us become a nation of people who love nature and wilderness.

Tigers live in the jungle. Any two year old can tell you that. But the two year old will probably not know how close we had come to not having any tigers in our jungles. In 2008 we had only about 1400 individuals in the wild. Since then, because of various conservation efforts, the population has shown and increase and stands at 2226 as per the 2014 survey. Though this is a good sign, we still have a long way to go. While the government is taking steps in this direction, we, the common public, can do a great deal too.I have given it a fair amount of thought and at first I thought that the only thing we can do is pray, but as I went on wildlife safaris and read more about Tigers, I realized that there are some little steps each of us can take that will go a long way:1) Treat wildlife with respect when you go for safaris - I have been to several wildlife safaris and during some of them I was horrified to see the behaviour of the tourists, as well as, in some cases, of the tour operators. They drive up too close to the animals and make a lot of noise. They forget that jungles are actually homes of these creatures and we are just guests, and that too uninvited. We need to give these animals their privacy. Tigers in general are the centre of attraction in most of these safaris, and as soon as a tiger is sighted, every jeep in the vicinity heads to the place where it has been sighted. Imagine yourself in place of the tiger. You are out for an afternoon siesta and suddenly you find yourself surrounded by 10-12 metallic giants with about 9 humans in each. You want to have nothing to do with these humans and you keep your distance, but these metallic giants keep inching closer, until you aren't comfortable anymore.The end result of such a situation will probably be another T-24 (the infamous tiger of Ranthambore that was recently confined after it killed a forest guard, its fourth human victim). As the distance between humans and tigers is compromised, several issues emerge. Tigers lose the fear of humans, and with that the chances of human-animal conflict increase.So when we go on safaris, we should be mindful of this fact and not tolerate any unruly behavior on the part of our fellow travellers or the staff manning the tour vehicles.2) Understand and accept the fact that this planet belongs as much to the tigers as it does to us - By now I think everyone is clear that we aren't God’s gift to the planet Earth. We are inconsiderate looters who have been draining the planet of its resources. We have failed to respect nature and the natural order of things. And by this measure, almost all other species are superior to us. All creatures except Humans live in complete harmony with nature. So in fact they deserve the planet more than us. So when a man jumps into a tiger enclosure despite all fences and barricades and the tiger kills him when the public starts throwing rocks at the animal, don't ask irrelevant questions like "Why didn't they shoot the tiger? Human life ko koi value nahi hai kya?" You may not like the answer. Today, a tiger's life is indeed more precious than a human beings.Believe this truth and go be an advocate for the tigers. Spread the word. No human disease is worth curing if the cure requires killing of a tiger. Speak against people who propagate such beliefs.3) Invest some time and energy and spend some time doing tiger safaris. This will not only fund the conservation efforts it will also enable you to write/speak about Tigers and their conservation with much more authority. Write about tigers, share heartwarming stories about tigers and their cubs. Move your readers and inspire them to take part in campaigns such as #AircelSaveOurTigers. Create an army of people who love tigers and inspire them to further inspire other people. Let us become a nation of people who love wild tigers. And most importantly never stop teaching your children that tigers live in the jungle - because tigers will exist as long as the world has a few people who believe that tigers should live in the jungle. Help contribute to this pool of people. #AircelSaveOurTigers.


4) Teach your kids to live in harmony with nature. Apart from what kids learn in school, there are many more lessons that are at least as important for them. Teach your kids about nature. Teach them to listen to the songs of the the birds and to try to identify them. Help them understand trees. Teach them how a leopard and a cheetah are two very different animals. Inform them that we once had cheetahs in India and how we lost them because of our greed. Tell them never to call a tiger a "sher", but a "baagh". Show them beautiful creatures like butterflies and teach them to take joy in how they flit from flower to flower. Build a birdhouse in your balcony and make it look inviting enough so that a bird adopts it as its home. If possible, keep a pet. Help your kids accept nature and creatures other than human beings as a part of their lives. This will not only transform them into keen observers but also someone who treasures nature and understands the roles various creatures play in nature. Some may ask how this will benefit tigers. The answer is that we don't have to save tigers just for today, nor do we have to save only tigers. Once we have enough tigers in the wild and if and when the balance of nature is restored, we will need to have a generation of human beings that is protective of our planet as a whole, not just a species 

Our parents gave us what they themselves, in many cases, were denied -- financial security and the luxury of choice. We have to inculcate in our children what we lacked -- an empathetic attitude towards the other inhabitants of this planet. The next generation has to be more intelligent than us, and by this I don't mean that they should be pros at using technology and gadgets, but that they should actually realize that intelligence doesn't always mean staying ahead of others, at times it also means taking others with you as you move forward. 


Nature works on a fine balance and if you think about it, you will see how beautifully the machinery works. Today we can choose to do away with the natural machinery and surround ourselves with an artificial lung. Tiger has become a symbol of this choice. Save tiger and stay with nature. Lose it and be prepared to discard our natural way of life and step into an artificial world. To me, it doesn't sound like such a difficult choice. What about you?



About the Blogger - 

VJ Sharma is Software Professional and passionate about Travel, Photography & Blogging. He has been blogging at www.Travellingcamera.com for more than 8 years now, which has more than 32 lac pageviews till date. VJ is involved in various Photography & Blogging related activities across the country. He strongly believes in responsible blogging and sharing true/unbiased information on this blog.



VJ is also Adobe Certified Expert in Lightroom and has been actively working with different organizations in India to take workshops on Lightroom, HDRs, Color Management and Black and White processing.

2 comments:

specs buffy said...

Live and let live...after all all of us are created equally by God and animals, birds and all creatures have the right to live!

VJ Sharma said...

Very well said SB. I really appreciate the efforts by corporates like Aircel on this front. Aircel, NDTV and lot of other NGOs have helped a lot in making people aware of the importance. Especially making kids aware of such initiatives is most important.

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