Well-organized Book and Bake Sale for a Noble Cause || #MobileGIRI

Last month, when the earthquake struck north India and Nepal, the world reacted with a lot of compassion and people started contributing to the relief operations as best as they could. While some donated money, some sent supplies, others thought of a more innovative way to offer support.A group of youngsters in Delhi decided to hold a book and bake sale and send all the proceeds of the sale off to Nepal. It sounded like a good initiative, but would make sense only if the word spread far and wide. But then I got to know that the same set of people had organizd a booksale in 2014 and apparently their confidence stems from the success of that sale. But I think even they did not anticipate the tremendous response they got this year. By the time we reached the venue, at 1pm, just one hour after the sale was opened to visitors, they had already sold 30% of the books.The sale was organized at someone's house in GKII, and books, which were being sold at a fraction of their actual price, were stacked in a room. The bakes (cookies and cakes) were placed on a table at the center of the room. While you had to pay for each slice of a cake, lemonade was on the house. Apart from books, handmade bookmarks were also on display.For someone who has to be physically restrained when in a bookstore, this place was no less than heaven. At the end of the day I demonstrated immense self-control and did pretty well. I bought only 9 books that costed me Rs. 500/-. My friend, Ashmi, picked up
Organizers of the Book and Bake Sale (from left to right): Prema Dutt Sharma, Indrani Basu, Ayushi Saxena, Swati Daftuar, Tomojit Basu, Nakashi Chowdhry, Nishtha Vadehra, and Aditi Subramaniam
(Blog post by Vibha Malhotra)

Last month, when the earthquake struck north India and Nepal, the world reacted with a lot of compassion and people started contributing to the relief operations as best as they could. While some donated money, some sent supplies, others thought of a more innovative way to offer support.

Last month, when the earthquake struck north India and Nepal, the world reacted with a lot of compassion and people started contributing to the relief operations as best as they could. While some donated money, some sent supplies, others thought of a more innovative way to offer support.A group of youngsters in Delhi decided to hold a book and bake sale and send all the proceeds of the sale off to Nepal. It sounded like a good initiative, but would make sense only if the word spread far and wide. But then I got to know that the same set of people had organizd a booksale in 2014 and apparently their confidence stems from the success of that sale. But I think even they did not anticipate the tremendous response they got this year. By the time we reached the venue, at 1pm, just one hour after the sale was opened to visitors, they had already sold 30% of the books.The sale was organized at someone's house in GKII, and books, which were being sold at a fraction of their actual price, were stacked in a room. The bakes (cookies and cakes) were placed on a table at the center of the room. While you had to pay for each slice of a cake, lemonade was on the house. Apart from books, handmade bookmarks were also on display.For someone who has to be physically restrained when in a bookstore, this place was no less than heaven. At the end of the day I demonstrated immense self-control and did pretty well. I bought only 9 books that costed me Rs. 500/-. My friend, Ashmi, picked up

A group of youngsters in Delhi decided to hold a book and bake sale and send all the proceeds of the sale off to Nepal. It sounded like a good initiative, but would make sense only if the word spread far and wide. But then I got to know that the same set of people had organizd a booksale in 2014 and apparently their confidence stems from the success of that sale. But I think even they did not anticipate the tremendous response they got this year. By the time we reached the venue, at 1pm, just one hour after the sale was opened to visitors, they had already sold 30% of the books.


Last month, when the earthquake struck north India and Nepal, the world reacted with a lot of compassion and people started contributing to the relief operations as best as they could. While some donated money, some sent supplies, others thought of a more innovative way to offer support.A group of youngsters in Delhi decided to hold a book and bake sale and send all the proceeds of the sale off to Nepal. It sounded like a good initiative, but would make sense only if the word spread far and wide. But then I got to know that the same set of people had organizd a booksale in 2014 and apparently their confidence stems from the success of that sale. But I think even they did not anticipate the tremendous response they got this year. By the time we reached the venue, at 1pm, just one hour after the sale was opened to visitors, they had already sold 30% of the books.The sale was organized at someone's house in GKII, and books, which were being sold at a fraction of their actual price, were stacked in a room. The bakes (cookies and cakes) were placed on a table at the center of the room. While you had to pay for each slice of a cake, lemonade was on the house. Apart from books, handmade bookmarks were also on display.For someone who has to be physically restrained when in a bookstore, this place was no less than heaven. At the end of the day I demonstrated immense self-control and did pretty well. I bought only 9 books that costed me Rs. 500/-. My friend, Ashmi, picked up

The sale was organized at someone's house in GKII, and books, which were being sold at a fraction of their actual price, were stacked in a room. The bakes (cookies and cakes) were placed on a table at the center of the room. While you had to pay for each slice of a cake, lemonade was on the house. Apart from books, handmade bookmarks were also on display.

Last month, when the earthquake struck north India and Nepal, the world reacted with a lot of compassion and people started contributing to the relief operations as best as they could. While some donated money, some sent supplies, others thought of a more innovative way to offer support.A group of youngsters in Delhi decided to hold a book and bake sale and send all the proceeds of the sale off to Nepal. It sounded like a good initiative, but would make sense only if the word spread far and wide. But then I got to know that the same set of people had organizd a booksale in 2014 and apparently their confidence stems from the success of that sale. But I think even they did not anticipate the tremendous response they got this year. By the time we reached the venue, at 1pm, just one hour after the sale was opened to visitors, they had already sold 30% of the books.The sale was organized at someone's house in GKII, and books, which were being sold at a fraction of their actual price, were stacked in a room. The bakes (cookies and cakes) were placed on a table at the center of the room. While you had to pay for each slice of a cake, lemonade was on the house. Apart from books, handmade bookmarks were also on display.For someone who has to be physically restrained when in a bookstore, this place was no less than heaven. At the end of the day I demonstrated immense self-control and did pretty well. I bought only 9 books that costed me Rs. 500/-. My friend, Ashmi, picked up

For someone who has to be physically restrained when in a bookstore, this place was no less than heaven. At the end of the day I demonstrated immense self-control and did pretty well. I bought only 9 books that costed me Rs. 500/-. My friend, Ashmi, picked up "a couple" of books too.

Last month, when the earthquake struck north India and Nepal, the world reacted with a lot of compassion and people started contributing to the relief operations as best as they could. While some donated money, some sent supplies, others thought of a more innovative way to offer support.A group of youngsters in Delhi decided to hold a book and bake sale and send all the proceeds of the sale off to Nepal. It sounded like a good initiative, but would make sense only if the word spread far and wide. But then I got to know that the same set of people had organizd a booksale in 2014 and apparently their confidence stems from the success of that sale. But I think even they did not anticipate the tremendous response they got this year. By the time we reached the venue, at 1pm, just one hour after the sale was opened to visitors, they had already sold 30% of the books.The sale was organized at someone's house in GKII, and books, which were being sold at a fraction of their actual price, were stacked in a room. The bakes (cookies and cakes) were placed on a table at the center of the room. While you had to pay for each slice of a cake, lemonade was on the house. Apart from books, handmade bookmarks were also on display.For someone who has to be physically restrained when in a bookstore, this place was no less than heaven. At the end of the day I demonstrated immense self-control and did pretty well. I bought only 9 books that costed me Rs. 500/-. My friend, Ashmi, picked up

I admire these youngsters for various reasons. Not only did they proactively organize a booksale in such a short time span to support a noble cause, they did it extremely professionally. Despite several people walking in and out of the room, there was no chaos. Books were well stacked, billing handled professionally, and guests greeted with a lot of enthusiasm. If the organizers can plan a book and bake sale at such a short notice, I wonder what miracles they would have been able to bring about if they had more time.

Last month, when the earthquake struck north India and Nepal, the world reacted with a lot of compassion and people started contributing to the relief operations as best as they could. While some donated money, some sent supplies, others thought of a more innovative way to offer support.A group of youngsters in Delhi decided to hold a book and bake sale and send all the proceeds of the sale off to Nepal. It sounded like a good initiative, but would make sense only if the word spread far and wide. But then I got to know that the same set of people had organizd a booksale in 2014 and apparently their confidence stems from the success of that sale. But I think even they did not anticipate the tremendous response they got this year. By the time we reached the venue, at 1pm, just one hour after the sale was opened to visitors, they had already sold 30% of the books.The sale was organized at someone's house in GKII, and books, which were being sold at a fraction of their actual price, were stacked in a room. The bakes (cookies and cakes) were placed on a table at the center of the room. While you had to pay for each slice of a cake, lemonade was on the house. Apart from books, handmade bookmarks were also on display.For someone who has to be physically restrained when in a bookstore, this place was no less than heaven. At the end of the day I demonstrated immense self-control and did pretty well. I bought only 9 books that costed me Rs. 500/-. My friend, Ashmi, picked up

2 comments:

Shilpi Dutta said...

I did not know about this sale. It was a good initiative and well organised! Wish I could contribute.

VJ Sharma said...

Hey Shilpi, It was definitely a great initiative and finally they sold all the books by end of sunday.

.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...