Art and Culture in Rome - Places you must see

While Milan is lovely, Rome is seductive, gorgeous and breathtaking on a whole new level. Grab a train from Milan to Rome for just 30 euros and you will be there in about 3 hours. Get off at the Termini station and enter the outdoor museum that is the Eternal City. Now a metropolitan city of more than 2.8 million people, Rome’s culture and spirit are still deeply rooted in her history. And her monuments, restored ruins, and churches are some of the best-preserved in the world. Here are the sites in Rome you don’t want to miss:
Credits by Leonid Andronov, Arena of Flaviana Amphitheatre

The Colosseum
The first bloody battle at the Roman Colosseum was held in 82 AD, and the public stadium is still standing today. Crows of up to 50,000 spectators would slock to see gladiators fight lions, tigers, leopards and other exotic beasts. It was the entertainment of it’s time. Romans still love getting together to watch sporting events - but now they are a bit less violent and involve a soccer ball. To avoid the long lines I recommend ordering your Colosseum tickets ahead of time. They also give you admission to the Palatine Hill and the Forum, which are very close by.

By ekatarina_belova, Night view of Pantheon in Rome

The Pantheon
Rome’s pagan temple dedicated to the Gods has been preserved incredibly well. This is quite an achievement, as the original temple was constructed in 27 BC. When Rome abandoned it’s pagan Gods in favor of Catholicism, they added an altar for worship. Then, after the Renaissance, the Pantheon became a tomb for Rome’s elites and favorite artists. It is the permanent resting place of Raphael and also several Italian kinds. If you happen to be in Rome on a rare day of snow, one of the most spectacular sensations is standing inside the Pantheon and watching the snow fall down through the oculus (the 27-foot hole in the Patheon’s rotunda).

Credits by BeBoy, Fontaine de Trevi Rome.

Trevi Fountain
Visit the Trevi Fountain with at least three coins to throw in. The first coin guarantees you’ll be back to Rome. The second is for luck in your love life, and the third is a wish of your own. Admire the Baroque beauty of the Neptune, god of the sea, in his chariot made of shells and pulled by majestic seahorses. People throw in an average of $3,500 a day, and the donations go to Rome’s food programs for the needy.

By Ttstudio, Castle St Angelo

Castel Sant'Angelo
Emperor Hadrian designed this fortress on the banks of the Tiber River as a mausoleum for his relatives. It is very close to the Vatican, so you can see them both in one afternoon. While it served as resting place for several centuries, in 401 BC it became a military fortress. Later on, it was used by the Vatican as a papal residence and eventually they turned it into a prison! Now it is a lovely museum where you can tour the old living quarters and admire the statue of Michael the archangel, found on the upper terrace.

By sborisov, Piazza Navona in Rome

Piazza Navona
In my opinion, Piazza Navona is the most spectacular square in Rome. First constructed as a sports venue in 89 AD, the square is now home to sweet open-air cafes, charming restaurants, and three fantastic fountains. The most beautiful is the Four Rivers, designed by Bernini himself. The fountain is comprised of four statues that represent rivers from four different continents: The Rio de la Plata, The Danube, The Ganges and The Nile.

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