A Coach Trip to Llandudno || The Beautiful Resort in the North of Wales


Year 2010-2011 was special because it completely changed the course of my life. I quit my job and ventured into a new career. I traveled to new places and I made new friends. And with them, I made some beautiful memories - ones that I am going to cherish forever.


It was during this period that I traveled all over the UK, sometimes with my friends and classmates Hannah and Kelsey and sometimes alone. Most of these trips were on coaches, and North of Wales was one of them. We stayed in the beautiful town of Llandudno, which is also Wales's largest resort. While we were free to explore Llandudno during the evenings, the town mostly acted as the base to exploring neighboring towns during the day. But, strangely, when I look back at the trip, it is these evening strolls through the streets of Llandudno and on the North Shore that I miss the most.


Year 2010-2011 was special because it completely changed the course of my life. I quit my job and ventured into a new career. I traveled to new places and I made new friends. And with them, I made some beautiful memories - ones that I am going to cherish forever.It was during this period that I traveled all over the UK, sometimes with my friends and classmates Hannah and Kelsey and sometimes alone. Most of these trips were on coaches, and North of Wales was one of them. We stayed in the beautiful town of Llandudno, which is also Wales's largest resort. While we were free to explore Llandudno during the evenings, the town mostly acted as the base to exploring neighboring towns during the day. But, strangely, when I look back at the trip, it is these evening strolls through the streets of Llandudno and on the North Shore that I miss the most.The first thing you notice about the town is the pristine North Shore. The Irish sea is calm and blue unlike the North Sea, which is rough and grey. We spent many hours just sitting here or strolling on the sands.And the beach was almost always nearly empty, except for a few families. But we always felt safe and close to civilization because of the hundreds of pastel-colored houses that line the beach. The rocky mound you see on the left is the Little Orme. This is the cenotaph, a war memorial erected after World War I. It lists the names of the soldiers from Llandudno who lost their lives during the World Wars I and II, and during the Iraq War. It stands proud on the promenade, which is also known as The Parade. Oh! And did I mention that the North Shore is actually a pebble beach. The colorful rocks shine through the crystal-clear water, and manage to look quite innocent, though they make the simple task of standing in the waters quite painful. I caught this lone man in a canoe on my camera. Visible on the right is Llandudno's Pier, which is the longest in Wales. The pier boasts of some of the most amazing shops that sell eatables and mementos. We took a walk there but except a couple of Fridge Magnets, I didn't buy anything. And these are my friends, the legendary Kelsey and Hannah. The best travel partners I could've hoped for.  Love you, girls! And miss you so much! The waves seem to have pushed Hannah into deep thought. During low tide, even the waves are very mild and do not throw any major surprises at you, unlike our Arabian Sea or Indian Ocean, where each wave seems to be scheming about new ways of drenching you. And moving away from the beach, this is St. John's Church. We often came across this beautiful building on our way to and fro the beach. The church opened in 1866 and now exercises considerable influence in Llandudno and the surrounding towns. A little windmill lamp outside the Káva Cafe. This quirky little thing caught my eye and I found it very fascinating. The town is full of such surprises. Grumpys' Sweets anyone? This was another surprise the town sprung on us. But I am not too fond of British candies, so we moved on. The town was special for these and many other reasons. And the trip to the North of Wales was much more than just Llandudno. So watch out for some exquisite snapshots of some of the neighboring towns. Coming soon, on Travelling Camera.

The first thing you notice about the town is the pristine North Shore. The Irish sea is calm and blue unlike the North Sea, which is rough and grey. We spent many hours just sitting here or strolling on the sands.


Year 2010-2011 was special because it completely changed the course of my life. I quit my job and ventured into a new career. I traveled to new places and I made new friends. And with them, I made some beautiful memories - ones that I am going to cherish forever.It was during this period that I traveled all over the UK, sometimes with my friends and classmates Hannah and Kelsey and sometimes alone. Most of these trips were on coaches, and North of Wales was one of them. We stayed in the beautiful town of Llandudno, which is also Wales's largest resort. While we were free to explore Llandudno during the evenings, the town mostly acted as the base to exploring neighboring towns during the day. But, strangely, when I look back at the trip, it is these evening strolls through the streets of Llandudno and on the North Shore that I miss the most.The first thing you notice about the town is the pristine North Shore. The Irish sea is calm and blue unlike the North Sea, which is rough and grey. We spent many hours just sitting here or strolling on the sands.And the beach was almost always nearly empty, except for a few families. But we always felt safe and close to civilization because of the hundreds of pastel-colored houses that line the beach. The rocky mound you see on the left is the Little Orme. This is the cenotaph, a war memorial erected after World War I. It lists the names of the soldiers from Llandudno who lost their lives during the World Wars I and II, and during the Iraq War. It stands proud on the promenade, which is also known as The Parade. Oh! And did I mention that the North Shore is actually a pebble beach. The colorful rocks shine through the crystal-clear water, and manage to look quite innocent, though they make the simple task of standing in the waters quite painful. I caught this lone man in a canoe on my camera. Visible on the right is Llandudno's Pier, which is the longest in Wales. The pier boasts of some of the most amazing shops that sell eatables and mementos. We took a walk there but except a couple of Fridge Magnets, I didn't buy anything. And these are my friends, the legendary Kelsey and Hannah. The best travel partners I could've hoped for.  Love you, girls! And miss you so much! The waves seem to have pushed Hannah into deep thought. During low tide, even the waves are very mild and do not throw any major surprises at you, unlike our Arabian Sea or Indian Ocean, where each wave seems to be scheming about new ways of drenching you. And moving away from the beach, this is St. John's Church. We often came across this beautiful building on our way to and fro the beach. The church opened in 1866 and now exercises considerable influence in Llandudno and the surrounding towns. A little windmill lamp outside the Káva Cafe. This quirky little thing caught my eye and I found it very fascinating. The town is full of such surprises. Grumpys' Sweets anyone? This was another surprise the town sprung on us. But I am not too fond of British candies, so we moved on. The town was special for these and many other reasons. And the trip to the North of Wales was much more than just Llandudno. So watch out for some exquisite snapshots of some of the neighboring towns. Coming soon, on Travelling Camera.
And the beach was almost always nearly empty, except for a few families. But we always felt safe and close to civilization because of the hundreds of pastel-colored houses that line the beach. The rocky mound you see on the left is the Little Orme.

Year 2010-2011 was special because it completely changed the course of my life. I quit my job and ventured into a new career. I traveled to new places and I made new friends. And with them, I made some beautiful memories - ones that I am going to cherish forever.It was during this period that I traveled all over the UK, sometimes with my friends and classmates Hannah and Kelsey and sometimes alone. Most of these trips were on coaches, and North of Wales was one of them. We stayed in the beautiful town of Llandudno, which is also Wales's largest resort. While we were free to explore Llandudno during the evenings, the town mostly acted as the base to exploring neighboring towns during the day. But, strangely, when I look back at the trip, it is these evening strolls through the streets of Llandudno and on the North Shore that I miss the most.The first thing you notice about the town is the pristine North Shore. The Irish sea is calm and blue unlike the North Sea, which is rough and grey. We spent many hours just sitting here or strolling on the sands.And the beach was almost always nearly empty, except for a few families. But we always felt safe and close to civilization because of the hundreds of pastel-colored houses that line the beach. The rocky mound you see on the left is the Little Orme. This is the cenotaph, a war memorial erected after World War I. It lists the names of the soldiers from Llandudno who lost their lives during the World Wars I and II, and during the Iraq War. It stands proud on the promenade, which is also known as The Parade. Oh! And did I mention that the North Shore is actually a pebble beach. The colorful rocks shine through the crystal-clear water, and manage to look quite innocent, though they make the simple task of standing in the waters quite painful. I caught this lone man in a canoe on my camera. Visible on the right is Llandudno's Pier, which is the longest in Wales. The pier boasts of some of the most amazing shops that sell eatables and mementos. We took a walk there but except a couple of Fridge Magnets, I didn't buy anything. And these are my friends, the legendary Kelsey and Hannah. The best travel partners I could've hoped for.  Love you, girls! And miss you so much! The waves seem to have pushed Hannah into deep thought. During low tide, even the waves are very mild and do not throw any major surprises at you, unlike our Arabian Sea or Indian Ocean, where each wave seems to be scheming about new ways of drenching you. And moving away from the beach, this is St. John's Church. We often came across this beautiful building on our way to and fro the beach. The church opened in 1866 and now exercises considerable influence in Llandudno and the surrounding towns. A little windmill lamp outside the Káva Cafe. This quirky little thing caught my eye and I found it very fascinating. The town is full of such surprises. Grumpys' Sweets anyone? This was another surprise the town sprung on us. But I am not too fond of British candies, so we moved on. The town was special for these and many other reasons. And the trip to the North of Wales was much more than just Llandudno. So watch out for some exquisite snapshots of some of the neighboring towns. Coming soon, on Travelling Camera.
This is the cenotaph, a war memorial erected after World War I. It lists the names of the soldiers from Llandudno who lost their lives during the World Wars I and II, and during the Iraq War. It stands proud on the promenade, which is also known as The Parade.

Year 2010-2011 was special because it completely changed the course of my life. I quit my job and ventured into a new career. I traveled to new places and I made new friends. And with them, I made some beautiful memories - ones that I am going to cherish forever.It was during this period that I traveled all over the UK, sometimes with my friends and classmates Hannah and Kelsey and sometimes alone. Most of these trips were on coaches, and North of Wales was one of them. We stayed in the beautiful town of Llandudno, which is also Wales's largest resort. While we were free to explore Llandudno during the evenings, the town mostly acted as the base to exploring neighboring towns during the day. But, strangely, when I look back at the trip, it is these evening strolls through the streets of Llandudno and on the North Shore that I miss the most.The first thing you notice about the town is the pristine North Shore. The Irish sea is calm and blue unlike the North Sea, which is rough and grey. We spent many hours just sitting here or strolling on the sands.And the beach was almost always nearly empty, except for a few families. But we always felt safe and close to civilization because of the hundreds of pastel-colored houses that line the beach. The rocky mound you see on the left is the Little Orme. This is the cenotaph, a war memorial erected after World War I. It lists the names of the soldiers from Llandudno who lost their lives during the World Wars I and II, and during the Iraq War. It stands proud on the promenade, which is also known as The Parade. Oh! And did I mention that the North Shore is actually a pebble beach. The colorful rocks shine through the crystal-clear water, and manage to look quite innocent, though they make the simple task of standing in the waters quite painful. I caught this lone man in a canoe on my camera. Visible on the right is Llandudno's Pier, which is the longest in Wales. The pier boasts of some of the most amazing shops that sell eatables and mementos. We took a walk there but except a couple of Fridge Magnets, I didn't buy anything. And these are my friends, the legendary Kelsey and Hannah. The best travel partners I could've hoped for.  Love you, girls! And miss you so much! The waves seem to have pushed Hannah into deep thought. During low tide, even the waves are very mild and do not throw any major surprises at you, unlike our Arabian Sea or Indian Ocean, where each wave seems to be scheming about new ways of drenching you. And moving away from the beach, this is St. John's Church. We often came across this beautiful building on our way to and fro the beach. The church opened in 1866 and now exercises considerable influence in Llandudno and the surrounding towns. A little windmill lamp outside the Káva Cafe. This quirky little thing caught my eye and I found it very fascinating. The town is full of such surprises. Grumpys' Sweets anyone? This was another surprise the town sprung on us. But I am not too fond of British candies, so we moved on. The town was special for these and many other reasons. And the trip to the North of Wales was much more than just Llandudno. So watch out for some exquisite snapshots of some of the neighboring towns. Coming soon, on Travelling Camera.
Oh! And did I mention that the North Shore is actually a pebble beach. The colorful rocks shine through the crystal-clear water, and manage to look quite innocent, though they make the simple task of standing in the waters quite painful.
Year 2010-2011 was special because it completely changed the course of my life. I quit my job and ventured into a new career. I traveled to new places and I made new friends. And with them, I made some beautiful memories - ones that I am going to cherish forever.It was during this period that I traveled all over the UK, sometimes with my friends and classmates Hannah and Kelsey and sometimes alone. Most of these trips were on coaches, and North of Wales was one of them. We stayed in the beautiful town of Llandudno, which is also Wales's largest resort. While we were free to explore Llandudno during the evenings, the town mostly acted as the base to exploring neighboring towns during the day. But, strangely, when I look back at the trip, it is these evening strolls through the streets of Llandudno and on the North Shore that I miss the most.The first thing you notice about the town is the pristine North Shore. The Irish sea is calm and blue unlike the North Sea, which is rough and grey. We spent many hours just sitting here or strolling on the sands.And the beach was almost always nearly empty, except for a few families. But we always felt safe and close to civilization because of the hundreds of pastel-colored houses that line the beach. The rocky mound you see on the left is the Little Orme. This is the cenotaph, a war memorial erected after World War I. It lists the names of the soldiers from Llandudno who lost their lives during the World Wars I and II, and during the Iraq War. It stands proud on the promenade, which is also known as The Parade. Oh! And did I mention that the North Shore is actually a pebble beach. The colorful rocks shine through the crystal-clear water, and manage to look quite innocent, though they make the simple task of standing in the waters quite painful. I caught this lone man in a canoe on my camera. Visible on the right is Llandudno's Pier, which is the longest in Wales. The pier boasts of some of the most amazing shops that sell eatables and mementos. We took a walk there but except a couple of Fridge Magnets, I didn't buy anything. And these are my friends, the legendary Kelsey and Hannah. The best travel partners I could've hoped for.  Love you, girls! And miss you so much! The waves seem to have pushed Hannah into deep thought. During low tide, even the waves are very mild and do not throw any major surprises at you, unlike our Arabian Sea or Indian Ocean, where each wave seems to be scheming about new ways of drenching you. And moving away from the beach, this is St. John's Church. We often came across this beautiful building on our way to and fro the beach. The church opened in 1866 and now exercises considerable influence in Llandudno and the surrounding towns. A little windmill lamp outside the Káva Cafe. This quirky little thing caught my eye and I found it very fascinating. The town is full of such surprises. Grumpys' Sweets anyone? This was another surprise the town sprung on us. But I am not too fond of British candies, so we moved on. The town was special for these and many other reasons. And the trip to the North of Wales was much more than just Llandudno. So watch out for some exquisite snapshots of some of the neighboring towns. Coming soon, on Travelling Camera.
I caught this lone man in a canoe on my camera. Visible on the right is Llandudno's Pier, which is the longest in Wales. The pier boasts of some of the most amazing shops that sell eatables and mementos. We took a walk there but except a couple of Fridge Magnets, I didn't buy anything. 

Year 2010-2011 was special because it completely changed the course of my life. I quit my job and ventured into a new career. I traveled to new places and I made new friends. And with them, I made some beautiful memories - ones that I am going to cherish forever.It was during this period that I traveled all over the UK, sometimes with my friends and classmates Hannah and Kelsey and sometimes alone. Most of these trips were on coaches, and North of Wales was one of them. We stayed in the beautiful town of Llandudno, which is also Wales's largest resort. While we were free to explore Llandudno during the evenings, the town mostly acted as the base to exploring neighboring towns during the day. But, strangely, when I look back at the trip, it is these evening strolls through the streets of Llandudno and on the North Shore that I miss the most.The first thing you notice about the town is the pristine North Shore. The Irish sea is calm and blue unlike the North Sea, which is rough and grey. We spent many hours just sitting here or strolling on the sands.And the beach was almost always nearly empty, except for a few families. But we always felt safe and close to civilization because of the hundreds of pastel-colored houses that line the beach. The rocky mound you see on the left is the Little Orme. This is the cenotaph, a war memorial erected after World War I. It lists the names of the soldiers from Llandudno who lost their lives during the World Wars I and II, and during the Iraq War. It stands proud on the promenade, which is also known as The Parade. Oh! And did I mention that the North Shore is actually a pebble beach. The colorful rocks shine through the crystal-clear water, and manage to look quite innocent, though they make the simple task of standing in the waters quite painful. I caught this lone man in a canoe on my camera. Visible on the right is Llandudno's Pier, which is the longest in Wales. The pier boasts of some of the most amazing shops that sell eatables and mementos. We took a walk there but except a couple of Fridge Magnets, I didn't buy anything. And these are my friends, the legendary Kelsey and Hannah. The best travel partners I could've hoped for.  Love you, girls! And miss you so much! The waves seem to have pushed Hannah into deep thought. During low tide, even the waves are very mild and do not throw any major surprises at you, unlike our Arabian Sea or Indian Ocean, where each wave seems to be scheming about new ways of drenching you. And moving away from the beach, this is St. John's Church. We often came across this beautiful building on our way to and fro the beach. The church opened in 1866 and now exercises considerable influence in Llandudno and the surrounding towns. A little windmill lamp outside the Káva Cafe. This quirky little thing caught my eye and I found it very fascinating. The town is full of such surprises. Grumpys' Sweets anyone? This was another surprise the town sprung on us. But I am not too fond of British candies, so we moved on. The town was special for these and many other reasons. And the trip to the North of Wales was much more than just Llandudno. So watch out for some exquisite snapshots of some of the neighboring towns. Coming soon, on Travelling Camera.
And these are my friends, the legendary Kelsey and Hannah. The best travel partners I could've hoped for.  Love you, girls! And miss you so much!

Year 2010-2011 was special because it completely changed the course of my life. I quit my job and ventured into a new career. I traveled to new places and I made new friends. And with them, I made some beautiful memories - ones that I am going to cherish forever.It was during this period that I traveled all over the UK, sometimes with my friends and classmates Hannah and Kelsey and sometimes alone. Most of these trips were on coaches, and North of Wales was one of them. We stayed in the beautiful town of Llandudno, which is also Wales's largest resort. While we were free to explore Llandudno during the evenings, the town mostly acted as the base to exploring neighboring towns during the day. But, strangely, when I look back at the trip, it is these evening strolls through the streets of Llandudno and on the North Shore that I miss the most.The first thing you notice about the town is the pristine North Shore. The Irish sea is calm and blue unlike the North Sea, which is rough and grey. We spent many hours just sitting here or strolling on the sands.And the beach was almost always nearly empty, except for a few families. But we always felt safe and close to civilization because of the hundreds of pastel-colored houses that line the beach. The rocky mound you see on the left is the Little Orme. This is the cenotaph, a war memorial erected after World War I. It lists the names of the soldiers from Llandudno who lost their lives during the World Wars I and II, and during the Iraq War. It stands proud on the promenade, which is also known as The Parade. Oh! And did I mention that the North Shore is actually a pebble beach. The colorful rocks shine through the crystal-clear water, and manage to look quite innocent, though they make the simple task of standing in the waters quite painful. I caught this lone man in a canoe on my camera. Visible on the right is Llandudno's Pier, which is the longest in Wales. The pier boasts of some of the most amazing shops that sell eatables and mementos. We took a walk there but except a couple of Fridge Magnets, I didn't buy anything. And these are my friends, the legendary Kelsey and Hannah. The best travel partners I could've hoped for.  Love you, girls! And miss you so much! The waves seem to have pushed Hannah into deep thought. During low tide, even the waves are very mild and do not throw any major surprises at you, unlike our Arabian Sea or Indian Ocean, where each wave seems to be scheming about new ways of drenching you. And moving away from the beach, this is St. John's Church. We often came across this beautiful building on our way to and fro the beach. The church opened in 1866 and now exercises considerable influence in Llandudno and the surrounding towns. A little windmill lamp outside the Káva Cafe. This quirky little thing caught my eye and I found it very fascinating. The town is full of such surprises. Grumpys' Sweets anyone? This was another surprise the town sprung on us. But I am not too fond of British candies, so we moved on. The town was special for these and many other reasons. And the trip to the North of Wales was much more than just Llandudno. So watch out for some exquisite snapshots of some of the neighboring towns. Coming soon, on Travelling Camera.

The waves seem to have pushed Hannah into deep thought. During low tide, even the waves are very mild and do not throw any major surprises at you, unlike our Arabian Sea or Indian Ocean, where each wave seems to be scheming about new ways of drenching you.

Year 2010-2011 was special because it completely changed the course of my life. I quit my job and ventured into a new career. I traveled to new places and I made new friends. And with them, I made some beautiful memories - ones that I am going to cherish forever.It was during this period that I traveled all over the UK, sometimes with my friends and classmates Hannah and Kelsey and sometimes alone. Most of these trips were on coaches, and North of Wales was one of them. We stayed in the beautiful town of Llandudno, which is also Wales's largest resort. While we were free to explore Llandudno during the evenings, the town mostly acted as the base to exploring neighboring towns during the day. But, strangely, when I look back at the trip, it is these evening strolls through the streets of Llandudno and on the North Shore that I miss the most.The first thing you notice about the town is the pristine North Shore. The Irish sea is calm and blue unlike the North Sea, which is rough and grey. We spent many hours just sitting here or strolling on the sands.And the beach was almost always nearly empty, except for a few families. But we always felt safe and close to civilization because of the hundreds of pastel-colored houses that line the beach. The rocky mound you see on the left is the Little Orme. This is the cenotaph, a war memorial erected after World War I. It lists the names of the soldiers from Llandudno who lost their lives during the World Wars I and II, and during the Iraq War. It stands proud on the promenade, which is also known as The Parade. Oh! And did I mention that the North Shore is actually a pebble beach. The colorful rocks shine through the crystal-clear water, and manage to look quite innocent, though they make the simple task of standing in the waters quite painful. I caught this lone man in a canoe on my camera. Visible on the right is Llandudno's Pier, which is the longest in Wales. The pier boasts of some of the most amazing shops that sell eatables and mementos. We took a walk there but except a couple of Fridge Magnets, I didn't buy anything. And these are my friends, the legendary Kelsey and Hannah. The best travel partners I could've hoped for.  Love you, girls! And miss you so much! The waves seem to have pushed Hannah into deep thought. During low tide, even the waves are very mild and do not throw any major surprises at you, unlike our Arabian Sea or Indian Ocean, where each wave seems to be scheming about new ways of drenching you. And moving away from the beach, this is St. John's Church. We often came across this beautiful building on our way to and fro the beach. The church opened in 1866 and now exercises considerable influence in Llandudno and the surrounding towns. A little windmill lamp outside the Káva Cafe. This quirky little thing caught my eye and I found it very fascinating. The town is full of such surprises. Grumpys' Sweets anyone? This was another surprise the town sprung on us. But I am not too fond of British candies, so we moved on. The town was special for these and many other reasons. And the trip to the North of Wales was much more than just Llandudno. So watch out for some exquisite snapshots of some of the neighboring towns. Coming soon, on Travelling Camera.

And moving away from the beach, this is St. John's Church. We often came across this beautiful building on our way to and fro the beach. The church opened in 1866 and now exercises considerable influence in Llandudno and the surrounding towns. 

Year 2010-2011 was special because it completely changed the course of my life. I quit my job and ventured into a new career. I traveled to new places and I made new friends. And with them, I made some beautiful memories - ones that I am going to cherish forever.It was during this period that I traveled all over the UK, sometimes with my friends and classmates Hannah and Kelsey and sometimes alone. Most of these trips were on coaches, and North of Wales was one of them. We stayed in the beautiful town of Llandudno, which is also Wales's largest resort. While we were free to explore Llandudno during the evenings, the town mostly acted as the base to exploring neighboring towns during the day. But, strangely, when I look back at the trip, it is these evening strolls through the streets of Llandudno and on the North Shore that I miss the most.The first thing you notice about the town is the pristine North Shore. The Irish sea is calm and blue unlike the North Sea, which is rough and grey. We spent many hours just sitting here or strolling on the sands.And the beach was almost always nearly empty, except for a few families. But we always felt safe and close to civilization because of the hundreds of pastel-colored houses that line the beach. The rocky mound you see on the left is the Little Orme. This is the cenotaph, a war memorial erected after World War I. It lists the names of the soldiers from Llandudno who lost their lives during the World Wars I and II, and during the Iraq War. It stands proud on the promenade, which is also known as The Parade. Oh! And did I mention that the North Shore is actually a pebble beach. The colorful rocks shine through the crystal-clear water, and manage to look quite innocent, though they make the simple task of standing in the waters quite painful. I caught this lone man in a canoe on my camera. Visible on the right is Llandudno's Pier, which is the longest in Wales. The pier boasts of some of the most amazing shops that sell eatables and mementos. We took a walk there but except a couple of Fridge Magnets, I didn't buy anything. And these are my friends, the legendary Kelsey and Hannah. The best travel partners I could've hoped for.  Love you, girls! And miss you so much! The waves seem to have pushed Hannah into deep thought. During low tide, even the waves are very mild and do not throw any major surprises at you, unlike our Arabian Sea or Indian Ocean, where each wave seems to be scheming about new ways of drenching you. And moving away from the beach, this is St. John's Church. We often came across this beautiful building on our way to and fro the beach. The church opened in 1866 and now exercises considerable influence in Llandudno and the surrounding towns. A little windmill lamp outside the Káva Cafe. This quirky little thing caught my eye and I found it very fascinating. The town is full of such surprises. Grumpys' Sweets anyone? This was another surprise the town sprung on us. But I am not too fond of British candies, so we moved on. The town was special for these and many other reasons. And the trip to the North of Wales was much more than just Llandudno. So watch out for some exquisite snapshots of some of the neighboring towns. Coming soon, on Travelling Camera.

A little windmill lamp outside the Káva Cafe. This quirky little thing caught my eye and I found it very fascinating. The town is full of such surprises.

Year 2010-2011 was special because it completely changed the course of my life. I quit my job and ventured into a new career. I traveled to new places and I made new friends. And with them, I made some beautiful memories - ones that I am going to cherish forever.It was during this period that I traveled all over the UK, sometimes with my friends and classmates Hannah and Kelsey and sometimes alone. Most of these trips were on coaches, and North of Wales was one of them. We stayed in the beautiful town of Llandudno, which is also Wales's largest resort. While we were free to explore Llandudno during the evenings, the town mostly acted as the base to exploring neighboring towns during the day. But, strangely, when I look back at the trip, it is these evening strolls through the streets of Llandudno and on the North Shore that I miss the most.The first thing you notice about the town is the pristine North Shore. The Irish sea is calm and blue unlike the North Sea, which is rough and grey. We spent many hours just sitting here or strolling on the sands.And the beach was almost always nearly empty, except for a few families. But we always felt safe and close to civilization because of the hundreds of pastel-colored houses that line the beach. The rocky mound you see on the left is the Little Orme. This is the cenotaph, a war memorial erected after World War I. It lists the names of the soldiers from Llandudno who lost their lives during the World Wars I and II, and during the Iraq War. It stands proud on the promenade, which is also known as The Parade. Oh! And did I mention that the North Shore is actually a pebble beach. The colorful rocks shine through the crystal-clear water, and manage to look quite innocent, though they make the simple task of standing in the waters quite painful. I caught this lone man in a canoe on my camera. Visible on the right is Llandudno's Pier, which is the longest in Wales. The pier boasts of some of the most amazing shops that sell eatables and mementos. We took a walk there but except a couple of Fridge Magnets, I didn't buy anything. And these are my friends, the legendary Kelsey and Hannah. The best travel partners I could've hoped for.  Love you, girls! And miss you so much! The waves seem to have pushed Hannah into deep thought. During low tide, even the waves are very mild and do not throw any major surprises at you, unlike our Arabian Sea or Indian Ocean, where each wave seems to be scheming about new ways of drenching you. And moving away from the beach, this is St. John's Church. We often came across this beautiful building on our way to and fro the beach. The church opened in 1866 and now exercises considerable influence in Llandudno and the surrounding towns. A little windmill lamp outside the Káva Cafe. This quirky little thing caught my eye and I found it very fascinating. The town is full of such surprises. Grumpys' Sweets anyone? This was another surprise the town sprung on us. But I am not too fond of British candies, so we moved on. The town was special for these and many other reasons. And the trip to the North of Wales was much more than just Llandudno. So watch out for some exquisite snapshots of some of the neighboring towns. Coming soon, on Travelling Camera.

Grumpys' Sweets anyone? This was another surprise the town sprung on us. But I am not too fond of British candies, so we moved on.



The town was special for these and many other reasons. And the trip to the North of Wales was much more than just Llandudno. So watch out for some exquisite snapshots of some of the neighboring towns. Coming soon, on Travelling Camera.

3 comments:

Akanksha Dureja said...

Llandudno is a beautiful little town which I got a chance to visit just before returning to India. The trip was legendary in many ways and I have fond memories of the place.

P.S. A post about North Wales seems incomplete without a picture of sheep gazing on the evergreen mountains.

Vibha said...

Yes I know what you mean Akanksha. Unfortunately we mostly passed those rolling hills in a bus and the photographs I clicked are just blurs. But I do carry a clear picture of it in my mind, as I am sure you do too.

Thanks for your generous comment...keep visiting!

Akanksha Dureja said...

I guess I was lucky to be travelling by a rented car and we could stop for clicks :)

I have vivid memories of sheep which looked like snow-flakes from distance. I could stop clicking only when the camera ran out of battery :P

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