Pabuji Ki Phad at Malji Ka Kamara at Churu, Rajasthan (India)


One of the exciting activity during our Churu trip was the beautiful evening when a bhopa family narrated the story of Pabuji, the Rathor Rajput Chief through their local musical instruments and songs describing the story. It was our last evening at Churu and next day we had to drive back to Delhi. The evening was full of fun with some of the awesome folk songs along with the popular lyrics like - 'Kesariya'. This Photo Journey shares some of the moments spent listening to 'Pabuji ki Phad' and dance moments with the family, who were telling this story.Deepak the owner of Malji Ka Kamara gave us some background about Pabuji Ki Phad - From where it started, who tell this story, what all instruments they use and various other things as the evening progressed.'Pabuji Ki Phad' is a basically a religious painting, which is mainly used for telling a musical story of Pabuji. Pabuji is considered as the Rathod Rajput chief. Bhopas of Pabusar are considered as traditional narrators of this art form. This art of telling story of Pabuji is very popular in Indian state of Rajasthan and it seems that there are very few folks in the world who know about this story. and there are only handful of folks, who know the complete story of Pabuji. Pabuji is also known as 'the Ascetic Deity of Sand Desert'. More about 'Pabuji Ki Phad' can be checked at - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pabuji_Ki_PhadThis family came dressed in red with all their musical instruments including a Ravan-hattha; which is made up of goat skin and camel teeth, a dhol and a metallic instrument. The man in left photograph was the leader, who was singing with Ravan-hattha and his wife was singing along at relevant places. One of his cousins was on dhol and son was dancing of the songs.Many times the lead musician stood up to accompany his son in dancing on beautiful rajasthani folk songs. It was awesome to see him dancing along with singing and playing ravan hattha.It is believed that Ravanhatha is originated among the Hela civilisation of Sri Lanka in the time of King Ravana. The bowl is made of cut coconut shell, the mouth of which is covered with goat hide. The stick is made up of bamboo, which is attached to this shell. There are two main strings - one is made up of steel and the other is made up of a set of horse hair. To know more about Ravanhatha, check out - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ravanahatha .Not sure, how many of us could really appreciate the epic of Pabuji but for sure, everyone of us enjoyed a lot on the music showcased by this family. Almost everyone of us danced with them on floor and few of the girls made best use of this opportunity to try out all the steps used by the Rajasthani  folks at Malji Ka Kamara. Overall experience was great and thanks for Mr. Lalji who corrected many of the facts which were being presented to us during the story telling part. Usually it's difficult to complete this story in an evening and it's not even recommended. But it's a good way for making people aware about these folk arts which are there for so many years and it's good to see that some of these folks are keeping it alive. The Churu ended very well with this performance by folks of Rajasthan, India.We shall go to Churu to experience this better !One of the exciting activity during our Churu trip was the beautiful evening when a bhopa family narrated the story of Pabuji, the Rathor Rajput Chief through their local musical instruments and songs describing the story. It was our last evening at Churu and next day we had to drive back to Delhi. The evening was full of fun with some of the awesome folk songs along with the popular lyrics like - 'Kesariya'. This Photo Journey shares some of the moments spent listening to 'Pabuji ki Phad' and dance moments with the family, who were telling this story.
One of the exciting activity during our Churu trip was the beautiful evening when a bhopa family narrated the story of Pabuji, the Rathor Rajput Chief through their local musical instruments and songs describing the story. It was our last evening at Churu and next day we had to drive back to Delhi. The evening was full of fun with some of the awesome folk songs along with the popular lyrics like - 'Kesariya'. This Photo Journey shares some of the moments spent listening to 'Pabuji ki Phad' and dance moments with the family, who were telling this story.Deepak the owner of Malji Ka Kamara gave us some background about Pabuji Ki Phad - From where it started, who tell this story, what all instruments they use and various other things as the evening progressed.'Pabuji Ki Phad' is a basically a religious painting, which is mainly used for telling a musical story of Pabuji. Pabuji is considered as the Rathod Rajput chief. Bhopas of Pabusar are considered as traditional narrators of this art form. This art of telling story of Pabuji is very popular in Indian state of Rajasthan and it seems that there are very few folks in the world who know about this story. and there are only handful of folks, who know the complete story of Pabuji. Pabuji is also known as 'the Ascetic Deity of Sand Desert'. More about 'Pabuji Ki Phad' can be checked at - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pabuji_Ki_PhadThis family came dressed in red with all their musical instruments including a Ravan-hattha; which is made up of goat skin and camel teeth, a dhol and a metallic instrument. The man in left photograph was the leader, who was singing with Ravan-hattha and his wife was singing along at relevant places. One of his cousins was on dhol and son was dancing of the songs.Many times the lead musician stood up to accompany his son in dancing on beautiful rajasthani folk songs. It was awesome to see him dancing along with singing and playing ravan hattha.It is believed that Ravanhatha is originated among the Hela civilisation of Sri Lanka in the time of King Ravana. The bowl is made of cut coconut shell, the mouth of which is covered with goat hide. The stick is made up of bamboo, which is attached to this shell. There are two main strings - one is made up of steel and the other is made up of a set of horse hair. To know more about Ravanhatha, check out - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ravanahatha .Not sure, how many of us could really appreciate the epic of Pabuji but for sure, everyone of us enjoyed a lot on the music showcased by this family. Almost everyone of us danced with them on floor and few of the girls made best use of this opportunity to try out all the steps used by the Rajasthani  folks at Malji Ka Kamara. Overall experience was great and thanks for Mr. Lalji who corrected many of the facts which were being presented to us during the story telling part. Usually it's difficult to complete this story in an evening and it's not even recommended. But it's a good way for making people aware about these folk arts which are there for so many years and it's good to see that some of these folks are keeping it alive. The Churu ended very well with this performance by folks of Rajasthan, India.We shall go to Churu to experience this better !
One of the exciting activity during our Churu trip was the beautiful evening when a bhopa family narrated the story of Pabuji, the Rathor Rajput Chief through their local musical instruments and songs describing the story. It was our last evening at Churu and next day we had to drive back to Delhi. The evening was full of fun with some of the awesome folk songs along with the popular lyrics like - 'Kesariya'. This Photo Journey shares some of the moments spent listening to 'Pabuji ki Phad' and dance moments with the family, who were telling this story.Deepak the owner of Malji Ka Kamara gave us some background about Pabuji Ki Phad - From where it started, who tell this story, what all instruments they use and various other things as the evening progressed.'Pabuji Ki Phad' is a basically a religious painting, which is mainly used for telling a musical story of Pabuji. Pabuji is considered as the Rathod Rajput chief. Bhopas of Pabusar are considered as traditional narrators of this art form. This art of telling story of Pabuji is very popular in Indian state of Rajasthan and it seems that there are very few folks in the world who know about this story. and there are only handful of folks, who know the complete story of Pabuji. Pabuji is also known as 'the Ascetic Deity of Sand Desert'. More about 'Pabuji Ki Phad' can be checked at - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pabuji_Ki_PhadThis family came dressed in red with all their musical instruments including a Ravan-hattha; which is made up of goat skin and camel teeth, a dhol and a metallic instrument. The man in left photograph was the leader, who was singing with Ravan-hattha and his wife was singing along at relevant places. One of his cousins was on dhol and son was dancing of the songs.Many times the lead musician stood up to accompany his son in dancing on beautiful rajasthani folk songs. It was awesome to see him dancing along with singing and playing ravan hattha.It is believed that Ravanhatha is originated among the Hela civilisation of Sri Lanka in the time of King Ravana. The bowl is made of cut coconut shell, the mouth of which is covered with goat hide. The stick is made up of bamboo, which is attached to this shell. There are two main strings - one is made up of steel and the other is made up of a set of horse hair. To know more about Ravanhatha, check out - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ravanahatha .Not sure, how many of us could really appreciate the epic of Pabuji but for sure, everyone of us enjoyed a lot on the music showcased by this family. Almost everyone of us danced with them on floor and few of the girls made best use of this opportunity to try out all the steps used by the Rajasthani  folks at Malji Ka Kamara. Overall experience was great and thanks for Mr. Lalji who corrected many of the facts which were being presented to us during the story telling part. Usually it's difficult to complete this story in an evening and it's not even recommended. But it's a good way for making people aware about these folk arts which are there for so many years and it's good to see that some of these folks are keeping it alive. The Churu ended very well with this performance by folks of Rajasthan, India.We shall go to Churu to experience this better ! 

Deepak the owner of Malji Ka Kamara gave us some background about Pabuji Ki Phad - From where it started, who tell this story, what all instruments they use and various One of the exciting activity during our Churu trip was the beautiful evening when a bhopa family narrated the story of Pabuji, the Rathor Rajput Chief through their local musical instruments and songs describing the story. It was our last evening at Churu and next day we had to drive back to Delhi. The evening was full of fun with some of the awesome folk songs along with the popular lyrics like - 'Kesariya'. This Photo Journey shares some of the moments spent listening to 'Pabuji ki Phad' and dance moments with the family, who were telling this story.Deepak the owner of Malji Ka Kamara gave us some background about Pabuji Ki Phad - From where it started, who tell this story, what all instruments they use and various other things as the evening progressed.'Pabuji Ki Phad' is a basically a religious painting, which is mainly used for telling a musical story of Pabuji. Pabuji is considered as the Rathod Rajput chief. Bhopas of Pabusar are considered as traditional narrators of this art form. This art of telling story of Pabuji is very popular in Indian state of Rajasthan and it seems that there are very few folks in the world who know about this story. and there are only handful of folks, who know the complete story of Pabuji. Pabuji is also known as 'the Ascetic Deity of Sand Desert'. More about 'Pabuji Ki Phad' can be checked at - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pabuji_Ki_PhadThis family came dressed in red with all their musical instruments including a Ravan-hattha; which is made up of goat skin and camel teeth, a dhol and a metallic instrument. The man in left photograph was the leader, who was singing with Ravan-hattha and his wife was singing along at relevant places. One of his cousins was on dhol and son was dancing of the songs.Many times the lead musician stood up to accompany his son in dancing on beautiful rajasthani folk songs. It was awesome to see him dancing along with singing and playing ravan hattha.It is believed that Ravanhatha is originated among the Hela civilisation of Sri Lanka in the time of King Ravana. The bowl is made of cut coconut shell, the mouth of which is covered with goat hide. The stick is made up of bamboo, which is attached to this shell. There are two main strings - one is made up of steel and the other is made up of a set of horse hair. To know more about Ravanhatha, check out - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ravanahatha .Not sure, how many of us could really appreciate the epic of Pabuji but for sure, everyone of us enjoyed a lot on the music showcased by this family. Almost everyone of us danced with them on floor and few of the girls made best use of this opportunity to try out all the steps used by the Rajasthani  folks at Malji Ka Kamara. Overall experience was great and thanks for Mr. Lalji who corrected many of the facts which were being presented to us during the story telling part. Usually it's difficult to complete this story in an evening and it's not even recommended. But it's a good way for making people aware about these folk arts which are there for so many years and it's good to see that some of these folks are keeping it alive. The Churu ended very well with this performance by folks of Rajasthan, India.We shall go to Churu to experience this better !other things as the evening progressed. 

'Pabuji Ki Phad' is a basically a religious painting, which is mainly used for telling a musical story of Pabuji. Pabuji is considered as the Rathod Rajput chief. Bhopas of Pabusar are considered as traditional narrators of this art form. 

One of the exciting activity during our Churu trip was the beautiful evening when a bhopa family narrated the story of Pabuji, the Rathor Rajput Chief through their local musical instruments and songs describing the story. It was our last evening at Churu and next day we had to drive back to Delhi. The evening was full of fun with some of the awesome folk songs along with the popular lyrics like - 'Kesariya'. This Photo Journey shares some of the moments spent listening to 'Pabuji ki Phad' and dance moments with the family, who were telling this story.Deepak the owner of Malji Ka Kamara gave us some background about Pabuji Ki Phad - From where it started, who tell this story, what all instruments they use and various other things as the evening progressed.'Pabuji Ki Phad' is a basically a religious painting, which is mainly used for telling a musical story of Pabuji. Pabuji is considered as the Rathod Rajput chief. Bhopas of Pabusar are considered as traditional narrators of this art form. This art of telling story of Pabuji is very popular in Indian state of Rajasthan and it seems that there are very few folks in the world who know about this story. and there are only handful of folks, who know the complete story of Pabuji. Pabuji is also known as 'the Ascetic Deity of Sand Desert'. More about 'Pabuji Ki Phad' can be checked at - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pabuji_Ki_PhadThis family came dressed in red with all their musical instruments including a Ravan-hattha; which is made up of goat skin and camel teeth, a dhol and a metallic instrument. The man in left photograph was the leader, who was singing with Ravan-hattha and his wife was singing along at relevant places. One of his cousins was on dhol and son was dancing of the songs.Many times the lead musician stood up to accompany his son in dancing on beautiful rajasthani folk songs. It was awesome to see him dancing along with singing and playing ravan hattha.It is believed that Ravanhatha is originated among the Hela civilisation of Sri Lanka in the time of King Ravana. The bowl is made of cut coconut shell, the mouth of which is covered with goat hide. The stick is made up of bamboo, which is attached to this shell. There are two main strings - one is made up of steel and the other is made up of a set of horse hair. To know more about Ravanhatha, check out - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ravanahatha .Not sure, how many of us could really appreciate the epic of Pabuji but for sure, everyone of us enjoyed a lot on the music showcased by this family. Almost everyone of us danced with them on floor and few of the girls made best use of this opportunity to try out all the steps used by the Rajasthani  folks at Malji Ka Kamara. Overall experience was great and thanks for Mr. Lalji who corrected many of the facts which were being presented to us during the story telling part. Usually it's difficult to complete this story in an evening and it's not even recommended. But it's a good way for making people aware about these folk arts which are there for so many years and it's good to see that some of these folks are keeping it alive. The Churu ended very well with this performance by folks of Rajasthan, India.We shall go to Churu to experience this better !

This art of telling story of Pabuji is very popular in Indian state of Rajasthan and it seems that there are very few folks in the world who know about this story. and there are only handful of folks, who know the complete story of Pabuji. Pabuji is also known as 'the Ascetic Deity of Sand Desert'. More about 'Pabuji Ki Phad' can be checked at - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pabuji_Ki_Phad

One of the exciting activity during our Churu trip was the beautiful evening when a bhopa family narrated the story of Pabuji, the Rathor Rajput Chief through their local musical instruments and songs describing the story. It was our last evening at Churu and next day we had to drive back to Delhi. The evening was full of fun with some of the awesome folk songs along with the popular lyrics like - 'Kesariya'. This Photo Journey shares some of the moments spent listening to 'Pabuji ki Phad' and dance moments with the family, who were telling this story.Deepak the owner of Malji Ka Kamara gave us some background about Pabuji Ki Phad - From where it started, who tell this story, what all instruments they use and various other things as the evening progressed.'Pabuji Ki Phad' is a basically a religious painting, which is mainly used for telling a musical story of Pabuji. Pabuji is considered as the Rathod Rajput chief. Bhopas of Pabusar are considered as traditional narrators of this art form. This art of telling story of Pabuji is very popular in Indian state of Rajasthan and it seems that there are very few folks in the world who know about this story. and there are only handful of folks, who know the complete story of Pabuji. Pabuji is also known as 'the Ascetic Deity of Sand Desert'. More about 'Pabuji Ki Phad' can be checked at - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pabuji_Ki_PhadThis family came dressed in red with all their musical instruments including a Ravan-hattha; which is made up of goat skin and camel teeth, a dhol and a metallic instrument. The man in left photograph was the leader, who was singing with Ravan-hattha and his wife was singing along at relevant places. One of his cousins was on dhol and son was dancing of the songs.Many times the lead musician stood up to accompany his son in dancing on beautiful rajasthani folk songs. It was awesome to see him dancing along with singing and playing ravan hattha.It is believed that Ravanhatha is originated among the Hela civilisation of Sri Lanka in the time of King Ravana. The bowl is made of cut coconut shell, the mouth of which is covered with goat hide. The stick is made up of bamboo, which is attached to this shell. There are two main strings - one is made up of steel and the other is made up of a set of horse hair. To know more about Ravanhatha, check out - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ravanahatha .Not sure, how many of us could really appreciate the epic of Pabuji but for sure, everyone of us enjoyed a lot on the music showcased by this family. Almost everyone of us danced with them on floor and few of the girls made best use of this opportunity to try out all the steps used by the Rajasthani  folks at Malji Ka Kamara. Overall experience was great and thanks for Mr. Lalji who corrected many of the facts which were being presented to us during the story telling part. Usually it's difficult to complete this story in an evening and it's not even recommended. But it's a good way for making people aware about these folk arts which are there for so many years and it's good to see that some of these folks are keeping it alive. The Churu ended very well with this performance by folks of Rajasthan, India.We shall go to Churu to experience this better !
This family came dressed in red with all theirOne of the exciting activity during our Churu trip was the beautiful evening when a bhopa family narrated the story of Pabuji, the Rathor Rajput Chief through their local musical instruments and songs describing the story. It was our last evening at Churu and next day we had to drive back to Delhi. The evening was full of fun with some of the awesome folk songs along with the popular lyrics like - 'Kesariya'. This Photo Journey shares some of the moments spent listening to 'Pabuji ki Phad' and dance moments with the family, who were telling this story.Deepak the owner of Malji Ka Kamara gave us some background about Pabuji Ki Phad - From where it started, who tell this story, what all instruments they use and various other things as the evening progressed.'Pabuji Ki Phad' is a basically a religious painting, which is mainly used for telling a musical story of Pabuji. Pabuji is considered as the Rathod Rajput chief. Bhopas of Pabusar are considered as traditional narrators of this art form. This art of telling story of Pabuji is very popular in Indian state of Rajasthan and it seems that there are very few folks in the world who know about this story. and there are only handful of folks, who know the complete story of Pabuji. Pabuji is also known as 'the Ascetic Deity of Sand Desert'. More about 'Pabuji Ki Phad' can be checked at - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pabuji_Ki_PhadThis family came dressed in red with all their musical instruments including a Ravan-hattha; which is made up of goat skin and camel teeth, a dhol and a metallic instrument. The man in left photograph was the leader, who was singing with Ravan-hattha and his wife was singing along at relevant places. One of his cousins was on dhol and son was dancing of the songs.Many times the lead musician stood up to accompany his son in dancing on beautiful rajasthani folk songs. It was awesome to see him dancing along with singing and playing ravan hattha.It is believed that Ravanhatha is originated among the Hela civilisation of Sri Lanka in the time of King Ravana. The bowl is made of cut coconut shell, the mouth of which is covered with goat hide. The stick is made up of bamboo, which is attached to this shell. There are two main strings - one is made up of steel and the other is made up of a set of horse hair. To know more about Ravanhatha, check out - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ravanahatha .Not sure, how many of us could really appreciate the epic of Pabuji but for sure, everyone of us enjoyed a lot on the music showcased by this family. Almost everyone of us danced with them on floor and few of the girls made best use of this opportunity to try out all the steps used by the Rajasthani  folks at Malji Ka Kamara. Overall experience was great and thanks for Mr. Lalji who corrected many of the facts which were being presented to us during the story telling part. Usually it's difficult to complete this story in an evening and it's not even recommended. But it's a good way for making people aware about these folk arts which are there for so many years and it's good to see that some of these folks are keeping it alive. The Churu ended very well with this performance by folks of Rajasthan, India.We shall go to Churu to experience this better ! musical instruments including a Ravan-hattha; which is made up of goat skin and camel teeth, a dhol and a metallic instrument. The man in left photograph was the leader, who was singing with Ravan-hattha and his wife was singing along at relevant places. One of his cousins was on dhol and son was dancing of the songs.

One of the exciting activity during our Churu trip was the beautiful evening when a bhopa family narrated the story of Pabuji, the Rathor Rajput Chief through their local musical instruments and songs describing the story. It was our last evening at Churu and next day we had to drive back to Delhi. The evening was full of fun with some of the awesome folk songs along with the popular lyrics like - 'Kesariya'. This Photo Journey shares some of the moments spent listening to 'Pabuji ki Phad' and dance moments with the family, who were telling this story.Deepak the owner of Malji Ka Kamara gave us some background about Pabuji Ki Phad - From where it started, who tell this story, what all instruments they use and various other things as the evening progressed.'Pabuji Ki Phad' is a basically a religious painting, which is mainly used for telling a musical story of Pabuji. Pabuji is considered as the Rathod Rajput chief. Bhopas of Pabusar are considered as traditional narrators of this art form. This art of telling story of Pabuji is very popular in Indian state of Rajasthan and it seems that there are very few folks in the world who know about this story. and there are only handful of folks, who know the complete story of Pabuji. Pabuji is also known as 'the Ascetic Deity of Sand Desert'. More about 'Pabuji Ki Phad' can be checked at - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pabuji_Ki_PhadThis family came dressed in red with all their musical instruments including a Ravan-hattha; which is made up of goat skin and camel teeth, a dhol and a metallic instrument. The man in left photograph was the leader, who was singing with Ravan-hattha and his wife was singing along at relevant places. One of his cousins was on dhol and son was dancing of the songs.Many times the lead musician stood up to accompany his son in dancing on beautiful rajasthani folk songs. It was awesome to see him dancing along with singing and playing ravan hattha.It is believed that Ravanhatha is originated among the Hela civilisation of Sri Lanka in the time of King Ravana. The bowl is made of cut coconut shell, the mouth of which is covered with goat hide. The stick is made up of bamboo, which is attached to this shell. There are two main strings - one is made up of steel and the other is made up of a set of horse hair. To know more about Ravanhatha, check out - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ravanahatha .Not sure, how many of us could really appreciate the epic of Pabuji but for sure, everyone of us enjoyed a lot on the music showcased by this family. Almost everyone of us danced with them on floor and few of the girls made best use of this opportunity to try out all the steps used by the Rajasthani  folks at Malji Ka Kamara. Overall experience was great and thanks for Mr. Lalji who corrected many of the facts which were being presented to us during the story telling part. Usually it's difficult to complete this story in an evening and it's not even recommended. But it's a good way for making people aware about these folk arts which are there for so many years and it's good to see that some of these folks are keeping it alive. The Churu ended very well with this performance by folks of Rajasthan, India.We shall go to Churu to experience this better !
Many times the lead musician stood up to accompany his son in dancing on beautiful rajasthani folk songs. It was awesome to see him dancing along with singing and playing ravan hattha.

One of the exciting activity during our Churu trip was the beautiful evening when a bhopa family narrated the story of Pabuji, the Rathor Rajput Chief through their local musical instruments and songs describing the story. It was our last evening at Churu and next day we had to drive back to Delhi. The evening was full of fun with some of the awesome folk songs along with the popular lyrics like - 'Kesariya'. This Photo Journey shares some of the moments spent listening to 'Pabuji ki Phad' and dance moments with the family, who were telling this story.Deepak the owner of Malji Ka Kamara gave us some background about Pabuji Ki Phad - From where it started, who tell this story, what all instruments they use and various other things as the evening progressed.'Pabuji Ki Phad' is a basically a religious painting, which is mainly used for telling a musical story of Pabuji. Pabuji is considered as the Rathod Rajput chief. Bhopas of Pabusar are considered as traditional narrators of this art form. This art of telling story of Pabuji is very popular in Indian state of Rajasthan and it seems that there are very few folks in the world who know about this story. and there are only handful of folks, who know the complete story of Pabuji. Pabuji is also known as 'the Ascetic Deity of Sand Desert'. More about 'Pabuji Ki Phad' can be checked at - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pabuji_Ki_PhadThis family came dressed in red with all their musical instruments including a Ravan-hattha; which is made up of goat skin and camel teeth, a dhol and a metallic instrument. The man in left photograph was the leader, who was singing with Ravan-hattha and his wife was singing along at relevant places. One of his cousins was on dhol and son was dancing of the songs.Many times the lead musician stood up to accompany his son in dancing on beautiful rajasthani folk songs. It was awesome to see him dancing along with singing and playing ravan hattha.It is believed that Ravanhatha is originated among the Hela civilisation of Sri Lanka in the time of King Ravana. The bowl is made of cut coconut shell, the mouth of which is covered with goat hide. The stick is made up of bamboo, which is attached to this shell. There are two main strings - one is made up of steel and the other is made up of a set of horse hair. To know more about Ravanhatha, check out - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ravanahatha .Not sure, how many of us could really appreciate the epic of Pabuji but for sure, everyone of us enjoyed a lot on the music showcased by this family. Almost everyone of us danced with them on floor and few of the girls made best use of this opportunity to try out all the steps used by the Rajasthani  folks at Malji Ka Kamara. Overall experience was great and thanks for Mr. Lalji who corrected many of the facts which were being presented to us during the story telling part. Usually it's difficult to complete this story in an evening and it's not even recommended. But it's a good way for making people aware about these folk arts which are there for so many years and it's good to see that some of these folks are keeping it alive. The Churu ended very well with this performance by folks of Rajasthan, India.We shall go to Churu to experience this better !
It is believed that Ravanhatha is originated One of the exciting activity during our Churu trip was the beautiful evening when a bhopa family narrated the story of Pabuji, the Rathor Rajput Chief through their local musical instruments and songs describing the story. It was our last evening at Churu and next day we had to drive back to Delhi. The evening was full of fun with some of the awesome folk songs along with the popular lyrics like - 'Kesariya'. This Photo Journey shares some of the moments spent listening to 'Pabuji ki Phad' and dance moments with the family, who were telling this story.Deepak the owner of Malji Ka Kamara gave us some background about Pabuji Ki Phad - From where it started, who tell this story, what all instruments they use and various other things as the evening progressed.'Pabuji Ki Phad' is a basically a religious painting, which is mainly used for telling a musical story of Pabuji. Pabuji is considered as the Rathod Rajput chief. Bhopas of Pabusar are considered as traditional narrators of this art form. This art of telling story of Pabuji is very popular in Indian state of Rajasthan and it seems that there are very few folks in the world who know about this story. and there are only handful of folks, who know the complete story of Pabuji. Pabuji is also known as 'the Ascetic Deity of Sand Desert'. More about 'Pabuji Ki Phad' can be checked at - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pabuji_Ki_PhadThis family came dressed in red with all their musical instruments including a Ravan-hattha; which is made up of goat skin and camel teeth, a dhol and a metallic instrument. The man in left photograph was the leader, who was singing with Ravan-hattha and his wife was singing along at relevant places. One of his cousins was on dhol and son was dancing of the songs.Many times the lead musician stood up to accompany his son in dancing on beautiful rajasthani folk songs. It was awesome to see him dancing along with singing and playing ravan hattha.It is believed that Ravanhatha is originated among the Hela civilisation of Sri Lanka in the time of King Ravana. The bowl is made of cut coconut shell, the mouth of which is covered with goat hide. The stick is made up of bamboo, which is attached to this shell. There are two main strings - one is made up of steel and the other is made up of a set of horse hair. To know more about Ravanhatha, check out - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ravanahatha .Not sure, how many of us could really appreciate the epic of Pabuji but for sure, everyone of us enjoyed a lot on the music showcased by this family. Almost everyone of us danced with them on floor and few of the girls made best use of this opportunity to try out all the steps used by the Rajasthani  folks at Malji Ka Kamara. Overall experience was great and thanks for Mr. Lalji who corrected many of the facts which were being presented to us during the story telling part. Usually it's difficult to complete this story in an evening and it's not even recommended. But it's a good way for making people aware about these folk arts which are there for so many years and it's good to see that some of these folks are keeping it alive. The Churu ended very well with this performance by folks of Rajasthan, India.We shall go to Churu to experience this better !among the Hela civilisation of Sri Lanka in the time of King Ravana. The bowl is made of cut coconut shell, the mouth of which is covered with goat hide. The stick is made up of bamboo, which is attached to this shell. There are two main strings - one is made up of steel and the other is made up of a set of horse hair. To know more about Ravanhatha, check out - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ravanahatha .

One of the exciting activity during our Churu trip was the beautiful evening when a bhopa family narrated the story of Pabuji, the Rathor Rajput Chief through their local musical instruments and songs describing the story. It was our last evening at Churu and next day we had to drive back to Delhi. The evening was full of fun with some of the awesome folk songs along with the popular lyrics like - 'Kesariya'. This Photo Journey shares some of the moments spent listening to 'Pabuji ki Phad' and dance moments with the family, who were telling this story.Deepak the owner of Malji Ka Kamara gave us some background about Pabuji Ki Phad - From where it started, who tell this story, what all instruments they use and various other things as the evening progressed.'Pabuji Ki Phad' is a basically a religious painting, which is mainly used for telling a musical story of Pabuji. Pabuji is considered as the Rathod Rajput chief. Bhopas of Pabusar are considered as traditional narrators of this art form. This art of telling story of Pabuji is very popular in Indian state of Rajasthan and it seems that there are very few folks in the world who know about this story. and there are only handful of folks, who know the complete story of Pabuji. Pabuji is also known as 'the Ascetic Deity of Sand Desert'. More about 'Pabuji Ki Phad' can be checked at - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pabuji_Ki_PhadThis family came dressed in red with all their musical instruments including a Ravan-hattha; which is made up of goat skin and camel teeth, a dhol and a metallic instrument. The man in left photograph was the leader, who was singing with Ravan-hattha and his wife was singing along at relevant places. One of his cousins was on dhol and son was dancing of the songs.Many times the lead musician stood up to accompany his son in dancing on beautiful rajasthani folk songs. It was awesome to see him dancing along with singing and playing ravan hattha.It is believed that Ravanhatha is originated among the Hela civilisation of Sri Lanka in the time of King Ravana. The bowl is made of cut coconut shell, the mouth of which is covered with goat hide. The stick is made up of bamboo, which is attached to this shell. There are two main strings - one is made up of steel and the other is made up of a set of horse hair. To know more about Ravanhatha, check out - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ravanahatha .Not sure, how many of us could really appreciate the epic of Pabuji but for sure, everyone of us enjoyed a lot on the music showcased by this family. Almost everyone of us danced with them on floor and few of the girls made best use of this opportunity to try out all the steps used by the Rajasthani  folks at Malji Ka Kamara. Overall experience was great and thanks for Mr. Lalji who corrected many of the facts which were being presented to us during the story telling part. Usually it's difficult to complete this story in an evening and it's not even recommended. But it's a good way for making people aware about these folk arts which are there for so many years and it's good to see that some of these folks are keeping it alive. The Churu ended very well with this performance by folks of Rajasthan, India.We shall go to Churu to experience this better !
Not sure, how many of us could really appreciate the epic of Pabuji but for sure, everyone of us enjoyed a lot on the music showcased by this family. Almost everyone One of the exciting activity during our Churu trip was the beautiful evening when a bhopa family narrated the story of Pabuji, the Rathor Rajput Chief through their local musical instruments and songs describing the story. It was our last evening at Churu and next day we had to drive back to Delhi. The evening was full of fun with some of the awesome folk songs along with the popular lyrics like - 'Kesariya'. This Photo Journey shares some of the moments spent listening to 'Pabuji ki Phad' and dance moments with the family, who were telling this story.Deepak the owner of Malji Ka Kamara gave us some background about Pabuji Ki Phad - From where it started, who tell this story, what all instruments they use and various other things as the evening progressed.'Pabuji Ki Phad' is a basically a religious painting, which is mainly used for telling a musical story of Pabuji. Pabuji is considered as the Rathod Rajput chief. Bhopas of Pabusar are considered as traditional narrators of this art form. This art of telling story of Pabuji is very popular in Indian state of Rajasthan and it seems that there are very few folks in the world who know about this story. and there are only handful of folks, who know the complete story of Pabuji. Pabuji is also known as 'the Ascetic Deity of Sand Desert'. More about 'Pabuji Ki Phad' can be checked at - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pabuji_Ki_PhadThis family came dressed in red with all their musical instruments including a Ravan-hattha; which is made up of goat skin and camel teeth, a dhol and a metallic instrument. The man in left photograph was the leader, who was singing with Ravan-hattha and his wife was singing along at relevant places. One of his cousins was on dhol and son was dancing of the songs.Many times the lead musician stood up to accompany his son in dancing on beautiful rajasthani folk songs. It was awesome to see him dancing along with singing and playing ravan hattha.It is believed that Ravanhatha is originated among the Hela civilisation of Sri Lanka in the time of King Ravana. The bowl is made of cut coconut shell, the mouth of which is covered with goat hide. The stick is made up of bamboo, which is attached to this shell. There are two main strings - one is made up of steel and the other is made up of a set of horse hair. To know more about Ravanhatha, check out - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ravanahatha .Not sure, how many of us could really appreciate the epic of Pabuji but for sure, everyone of us enjoyed a lot on the music showcased by this family. Almost everyone of us danced with them on floor and few of the girls made best use of this opportunity to try out all the steps used by the Rajasthani  folks at Malji Ka Kamara. Overall experience was great and thanks for Mr. Lalji who corrected many of the facts which were being presented to us during the story telling part. Usually it's difficult to complete this story in an evening and it's not even recommended. But it's a good way for making people aware about these folk arts which are there for so many years and it's good to see that some of these folks are keeping it alive. The Churu ended very well with this performance by folks of Rajasthan, India.We shall go to Churu to experience this better !of us danced with them on floor and few of the girls made best use of this opportunity to try out all the steps used by the Rajasthani  folks at Malji Ka Kamara. Overall experience was great and thanks for Mr. Lalji who corrected many of the facts which were being presented to us during the story telling part. Usually it's difficult to complete this story in an evening and it's not even recommended. But it's a good way for making people aware about these folk arts which are there for so many years and it's good to see that some of these folks are keeping it alive. The Churu ended very well with this performance by folks of Rajasthan, India.

We shall go to Churu to experience this better !


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