Delhi's International Kite-Flying Festival by Delhi Tourism @ India Gate, Delhi (INDIA) || Kite-Flying experts from UK, Indonesia, France, Mumbai, Manglore, Chennai, Chandigarh and different parts of the world (8th & 9th December 2012)

Every year Delhi Tourism Department organizes this wonderful festival for Kite Flying lovers and especially for kids of the country. Delhi has a long history of flying kites and all of us have some fond memories related to flying kites in our childhood. As time passes and one becomes busy with the mundane activities of everyday life, these memories are pushed behind to the back of our minds. The Kite Festival organized by Delhi Tourism brings back some of those memories. Let's check out this PHOTO JOURNEY to know more about Delhi Kite Festival.Here is how Delhi Chief Minister of Delhi expresses her viewpoint about Delhi International Kite Flying Festival -'Kite Flying has been an integral part of the culture of India and the rave response to the first Kite Flying Festival held in Delhi organized by Delhi Tourism is a proof that even in this age of Internet Technology and Social Media, kites have the ability of drag us out of our homes and go back to our childhoods for a bit. Owing to the obvious enthusiasm Delhi harbors for kites, we’ll make this an annual event and celebrate the revival of this erstwhile fading tradition year after year. I congratulate Delhi Tourism for organizing the Kite Flying Festival in Delhi and for bringing out this vibrant souvenir, which is the perfect way to commemorate the event. And I would also like to thank the people of Delhi for making it a huge success.A photograph of 3D Kite flying in the sky around India Gate in DelhiFor the first time in November 2011, the skies over India Gate in Delhi were painted in rainbow colours and decorated with myriad shapes. Kites in all shapes and sizes took over the sky and brought the city to life. The first ever Kite-Flying Festival in Delhi had opened to an overwhelming response by participants and spectators.A passionate Kite flyer from Great Britain who seemed one of the most energetic Kite-flyer on the ground. Most of the kite flyers had some assisting people with them, but he was handling multiple kites on his own. People of all ages, families, couples, and children gathered around in the lush grounds near India Gate and witnessed the unfolding of this event with awe.  It was as if Delhi had been waiting for such an event for ages.  None of the events lacked participation. From kite flying to kite fighting to other cultural events, all were teeming with participants and spectators.  The atmosphere was charged up and spirits as high as a kite can go, encouraging us to consider the possibility of holding this festival every yearThere were various types of kites flying in the sky. Here is one of the colorful kite with unique shape and the man handling this kite is a member of Chennai Kite Club.Ever since the beginning of human existence, the obsession with the sky has led to inventions after inventions to help us in our bid to conquer the sky. And it was because of this fascination that our ancestors flew the first kites.   Each movement of a kite while it’s on a flight inspires poetry. Our hearts dive when it plunges and when it soars through the sky and achieves heights we can never hope to achieve owing to our human limitations, our spirit flies with it. A kite embodies human desires and it is no wonder then that it symbolizes freedom, joy, prosperity, fortune, and all things good to us.Kite flying has been an age-old tradition in India but now with the intrusion of technology and social media, sports like kite-flying has started retreating into the shadows. Kite Festivals, held from time to time, in different parts of the country are amongst some of the initiatives to celebrate and revive this fading sport. Kites have been a part of our tradition since ancient times and even today they are flown to celebrate various festivals and sentiments. Culturally, for Indians, Kites represent everything that is good – happiness, prosperity, freedom, and peace.Makar Sankranti, the festival that celebrates the movement of the sun into the Northern Hemisphere, is all about flying kites. On this day, especially in Gujarat and Rajasthan, families flock on terraces and indulge in kite flying and fighting from sunrise to sunset and even beyond that. Basant Panchami is another festival on which kite-flying is common.  In Delhi, kites are flown on the Independence Day to celebrate freedom. Tricolors are the most popular kites to be flown on this day. According to Bhai Mian, the man who can rightfully be termed as one of the Godfathers’ of the art of Kite making and flying in Delhi, kites are still flown daily in Old Delhi. He also rubbishes all claims that the tradition is fading. According to him, children are as enthusiastic about kites as they used to be during his youth.Kite Flying is a popular sport in the whole of Asia. In Afghanistan , kite flying suffered till some years back when it was banned. However, now the sport is slowly reviving. In Pakistan, it often transforms into Kite Fighting and is especially popular during the spring. China, often thought to be the birthplace of kite flying, also houses Weifang, the kite flying capital of the world. China also boasts of the largest kite museum in the world.  The photograph above shows one of the kite flying expert from Indonesia.In Europe, Kite Flying is a part of the culture in Greek and Cyprus. Kites of the British Overseas Territory of Bermuda hold world records for altitude and duration. In some countries of South America, the traditions are surprisingly close to those in India. Kites are flown on Independence Day in Chile.  In Guyana, they’re flown around EasterAll over the world, kite festivals welcome international participation. Several of these festivals have been around for some years while new ones are cropping up every year. It seems the entire world is awakening to the charm of kites now.Common belief is that kites were introduced in India by a couple of Chinese Travellers. However, that is where the similarity between Indian and Chinese kites ends. Modern Indian fighter kites are completely different from elaborate Chinese versions. And lately, Chinese kites and strings have started making their appearance in Indian Markets though Bhai Mian maintains that Indian kites are better than their Chinese counterparts in maneuverability and agilitMany believe that kite flying dates back to the time of Mahabharat when they were used to pass messages from one kingdom to another.  However, the earliest evidence of Kite Flying in India is in form of miniature paintings from the Mughal Period dating back to the 1500s. There are many references of lovers delivering romantic messages to each other using kites.   Gradually kite-flying and kite-fighting evolved into full-fledged sports and kites started being flown to celebrate various occasions such as the onset of spring, the Independence Day, and Uttarayan.  And now, history is again being rewritten by dedicated festivals being organized to celebrate kites and all that they stand for. Kite festivals are celebrated all across India with great enthusiasm. The festival in Rajasthan is called the Desert Kite Festival. And along with the main festival in Jodhpur, several parallel celebrations are organized in other cities of the state. Kites also unleashed their magic towards the south. This year, in Hyderabad, the Great Hyderabad Adventure Club organized a Kite Flying festival on the 15th of January. And in Kerala, the second Kerala Kite Festival was organized on January 22nd and 23rd. All of these festivals were received with palpable excitement by the flyers. However, the biggest Kite Festival in India is perhaps the one that is organized on Makar Sankranti in Ahmedabad, Gujarat. This festival has been held every year with increasing fanfare since 1989. The numbers, sizes, shapes, and varieties of kites flown during this festival are outrageous and kite flyers from across the globe attend this festival and showcase their kites and their kite flying skills for the benefit of the others. With so many kites in the sky, it is a wonder how these kites, especially the huge, intricate ones manage to survive. Some facts about Kite Flying :)1.    The Chinese believe that when we look up at a kite in the sky, our mouth opens a bit. This helps in getting rid of the excess heat in the body and, thus, maintaining a healthy Yin-Yang Balance.2.    Japan banned kite-flying in 1760 because it was distracting too many people from their work.3.    East Germany banned large kites because it was thought that they could potentially be used to lift someone across the Berlin Wall4.    In 1855, the Russians towed torpedoes with great accuracy using kites.5.    Kite-flying is growing faster than most other sports in the world6.    Kites have been used for various purposes throughout the world. The uses include fishing, war propaganda, lifting material to workmen working on structures of great heights, lifting observers in wars, and so on.Overall it was great experience to see lot of colorful kites in the sky and looking for next year's Kite Festival in Delhi !!!

Every year Delhi Tourism Department organizes this wonderful festival for Kite Flying lovers and especially for kids of the country. Delhi has a long history of flying kites and all of us have some fond memories related to flying kites in our childhood. As time passes and one becomes busy with the mundane activities of everyday life, these memories are pushed behind to the back of our minds. The Kite Festival organized by Delhi Tourism brings back some of those memories. Let's check out this PHOTO JOURNEY to know more about Delhi Kite Festival.


Every year Delhi Tourism Department organizes this wonderful festival for Kite Flying lovers and especially for kids of the country. Delhi has a long history of flying kites and all of us have some fond memories related to flying kites in our childhood. As time passes and one becomes busy with the mundane activities of everyday life, these memories are pushed behind to the back of our minds. The Kite Festival organized by Delhi Tourism brings back some of those memories. Let's check out this PHOTO JOURNEY to know more about Delhi Kite Festival.Here is how Delhi Chief Minister of Delhi expresses her viewpoint about Delhi International Kite Flying Festival -'Kite Flying has been an integral part of the culture of India and the rave response to the first Kite Flying Festival held in Delhi organized by Delhi Tourism is a proof that even in this age of Internet Technology and Social Media, kites have the ability of drag us out of our homes and go back to our childhoods for a bit. Owing to the obvious enthusiasm Delhi harbors for kites, we’ll make this an annual event and celebrate the revival of this erstwhile fading tradition year after year. I congratulate Delhi Tourism for organizing the Kite Flying Festival in Delhi and for bringing out this vibrant souvenir, which is the perfect way to commemorate the event. And I would also like to thank the people of Delhi for making it a huge success.A photograph of 3D Kite flying in the sky around India Gate in DelhiFor the first time in November 2011, the skies over India Gate in Delhi were painted in rainbow colours and decorated with myriad shapes. Kites in all shapes and sizes took over the sky and brought the city to life. The first ever Kite-Flying Festival in Delhi had opened to an overwhelming response by participants and spectators.A passionate Kite flyer from Great Britain who seemed one of the most energetic Kite-flyer on the ground. Most of the kite flyers had some assisting people with them, but he was handling multiple kites on his own. People of all ages, families, couples, and children gathered around in the lush grounds near India Gate and witnessed the unfolding of this event with awe.  It was as if Delhi had been waiting for such an event for ages.  None of the events lacked participation. From kite flying to kite fighting to other cultural events, all were teeming with participants and spectators.  The atmosphere was charged up and spirits as high as a kite can go, encouraging us to consider the possibility of holding this festival every yearThere were various types of kites flying in the sky. Here is one of the colorful kite with unique shape and the man handling this kite is a member of Chennai Kite Club.Ever since the beginning of human existence, the obsession with the sky has led to inventions after inventions to help us in our bid to conquer the sky. And it was because of this fascination that our ancestors flew the first kites.   Each movement of a kite while it’s on a flight inspires poetry. Our hearts dive when it plunges and when it soars through the sky and achieves heights we can never hope to achieve owing to our human limitations, our spirit flies with it. A kite embodies human desires and it is no wonder then that it symbolizes freedom, joy, prosperity, fortune, and all things good to us.Kite flying has been an age-old tradition in India but now with the intrusion of technology and social media, sports like kite-flying has started retreating into the shadows. Kite Festivals, held from time to time, in different parts of the country are amongst some of the initiatives to celebrate and revive this fading sport. Kites have been a part of our tradition since ancient times and even today they are flown to celebrate various festivals and sentiments. Culturally, for Indians, Kites represent everything that is good – happiness, prosperity, freedom, and peace.Makar Sankranti, the festival that celebrates the movement of the sun into the Northern Hemisphere, is all about flying kites. On this day, especially in Gujarat and Rajasthan, families flock on terraces and indulge in kite flying and fighting from sunrise to sunset and even beyond that. Basant Panchami is another festival on which kite-flying is common.  In Delhi, kites are flown on the Independence Day to celebrate freedom. Tricolors are the most popular kites to be flown on this day. According to Bhai Mian, the man who can rightfully be termed as one of the Godfathers’ of the art of Kite making and flying in Delhi, kites are still flown daily in Old Delhi. He also rubbishes all claims that the tradition is fading. According to him, children are as enthusiastic about kites as they used to be during his youth.Kite Flying is a popular sport in the whole of Asia. In Afghanistan , kite flying suffered till some years back when it was banned. However, now the sport is slowly reviving. In Pakistan, it often transforms into Kite Fighting and is especially popular during the spring. China, often thought to be the birthplace of kite flying, also houses Weifang, the kite flying capital of the world. China also boasts of the largest kite museum in the world.  The photograph above shows one of the kite flying expert from Indonesia.In Europe, Kite Flying is a part of the culture in Greek and Cyprus. Kites of the British Overseas Territory of Bermuda hold world records for altitude and duration. In some countries of South America, the traditions are surprisingly close to those in India. Kites are flown on Independence Day in Chile.  In Guyana, they’re flown around EasterAll over the world, kite festivals welcome international participation. Several of these festivals have been around for some years while new ones are cropping up every year. It seems the entire world is awakening to the charm of kites now.Common belief is that kites were introduced in India by a couple of Chinese Travellers. However, that is where the similarity between Indian and Chinese kites ends. Modern Indian fighter kites are completely different from elaborate Chinese versions. And lately, Chinese kites and strings have started making their appearance in Indian Markets though Bhai Mian maintains that Indian kites are better than their Chinese counterparts in maneuverability and agilitMany believe that kite flying dates back to the time of Mahabharat when they were used to pass messages from one kingdom to another.  However, the earliest evidence of Kite Flying in India is in form of miniature paintings from the Mughal Period dating back to the 1500s. There are many references of lovers delivering romantic messages to each other using kites.   Gradually kite-flying and kite-fighting evolved into full-fledged sports and kites started being flown to celebrate various occasions such as the onset of spring, the Independence Day, and Uttarayan.  And now, history is again being rewritten by dedicated festivals being organized to celebrate kites and all that they stand for. Kite festivals are celebrated all across India with great enthusiasm. The festival in Rajasthan is called the Desert Kite Festival. And along with the main festival in Jodhpur, several parallel celebrations are organized in other cities of the state. Kites also unleashed their magic towards the south. This year, in Hyderabad, the Great Hyderabad Adventure Club organized a Kite Flying festival on the 15th of January. And in Kerala, the second Kerala Kite Festival was organized on January 22nd and 23rd. All of these festivals were received with palpable excitement by the flyers. However, the biggest Kite Festival in India is perhaps the one that is organized on Makar Sankranti in Ahmedabad, Gujarat. This festival has been held every year with increasing fanfare since 1989. The numbers, sizes, shapes, and varieties of kites flown during this festival are outrageous and kite flyers from across the globe attend this festival and showcase their kites and their kite flying skills for the benefit of the others. With so many kites in the sky, it is a wonder how these kites, especially the huge, intricate ones manage to survive. Some facts about Kite Flying :)1.    The Chinese believe that when we look up at a kite in the sky, our mouth opens a bit. This helps in getting rid of the excess heat in the body and, thus, maintaining a healthy Yin-Yang Balance.2.    Japan banned kite-flying in 1760 because it was distracting too many people from their work.3.    East Germany banned large kites because it was thought that they could potentially be used to lift someone across the Berlin Wall4.    In 1855, the Russians towed torpedoes with great accuracy using kites.5.    Kite-flying is growing faster than most other sports in the world6.    Kites have been used for various purposes throughout the world. The uses include fishing, war propaganda, lifting material to workmen working on structures of great heights, lifting observers in wars, and so on.Overall it was great experience to see lot of colorful kites in the sky and looking for next year's Kite Festival in Delhi !!!

Here is how Delhi Chief Minister of Delhi expresses her viewpoint about Delhi International Kite Flying Festival - 

'Kite Flying has been an integral part of the culture of India and the rave response to the first Kite Flying Festival held in Delhi organized by Delhi Tourism is a proof that even in this age of Internet Technology and Social Media, kites have the ability of drag us out of our homes and go back to our childhoods for a bit. Owing to the obvious enthusiasm Delhi harbors for kites, we’ll make this an annual event and celebrate the revival of this erstwhile fading tradition year after year.  
I congratulate Delhi Tourism for organizing the Kite Flying Festival in Delhi and for bringing out this vibrant souvenir, which is the perfect way to commemorate the event. And I would also like to thank the people of Delhi for making it a huge success.'

Every year Delhi Tourism Department organizes this wonderful festival for Kite Flying lovers and especially for kids of the country. Delhi has a long history of flying kites and all of us have some fond memories related to flying kites in our childhood. As time passes and one becomes busy with the mundane activities of everyday life, these memories are pushed behind to the back of our minds. The Kite Festival organized by Delhi Tourism brings back some of those memories. Let's check out this PHOTO JOURNEY to know more about Delhi Kite Festival.Here is how Delhi Chief Minister of Delhi expresses her viewpoint about Delhi International Kite Flying Festival -'Kite Flying has been an integral part of the culture of India and the rave response to the first Kite Flying Festival held in Delhi organized by Delhi Tourism is a proof that even in this age of Internet Technology and Social Media, kites have the ability of drag us out of our homes and go back to our childhoods for a bit. Owing to the obvious enthusiasm Delhi harbors for kites, we’ll make this an annual event and celebrate the revival of this erstwhile fading tradition year after year. I congratulate Delhi Tourism for organizing the Kite Flying Festival in Delhi and for bringing out this vibrant souvenir, which is the perfect way to commemorate the event. And I would also like to thank the people of Delhi for making it a huge success.A photograph of 3D Kite flying in the sky around India Gate in DelhiFor the first time in November 2011, the skies over India Gate in Delhi were painted in rainbow colours and decorated with myriad shapes. Kites in all shapes and sizes took over the sky and brought the city to life. The first ever Kite-Flying Festival in Delhi had opened to an overwhelming response by participants and spectators.A passionate Kite flyer from Great Britain who seemed one of the most energetic Kite-flyer on the ground. Most of the kite flyers had some assisting people with them, but he was handling multiple kites on his own. People of all ages, families, couples, and children gathered around in the lush grounds near India Gate and witnessed the unfolding of this event with awe.  It was as if Delhi had been waiting for such an event for ages.  None of the events lacked participation. From kite flying to kite fighting to other cultural events, all were teeming with participants and spectators.  The atmosphere was charged up and spirits as high as a kite can go, encouraging us to consider the possibility of holding this festival every yearThere were various types of kites flying in the sky. Here is one of the colorful kite with unique shape and the man handling this kite is a member of Chennai Kite Club.Ever since the beginning of human existence, the obsession with the sky has led to inventions after inventions to help us in our bid to conquer the sky. And it was because of this fascination that our ancestors flew the first kites.   Each movement of a kite while it’s on a flight inspires poetry. Our hearts dive when it plunges and when it soars through the sky and achieves heights we can never hope to achieve owing to our human limitations, our spirit flies with it. A kite embodies human desires and it is no wonder then that it symbolizes freedom, joy, prosperity, fortune, and all things good to us.Kite flying has been an age-old tradition in India but now with the intrusion of technology and social media, sports like kite-flying has started retreating into the shadows. Kite Festivals, held from time to time, in different parts of the country are amongst some of the initiatives to celebrate and revive this fading sport. Kites have been a part of our tradition since ancient times and even today they are flown to celebrate various festivals and sentiments. Culturally, for Indians, Kites represent everything that is good – happiness, prosperity, freedom, and peace.Makar Sankranti, the festival that celebrates the movement of the sun into the Northern Hemisphere, is all about flying kites. On this day, especially in Gujarat and Rajasthan, families flock on terraces and indulge in kite flying and fighting from sunrise to sunset and even beyond that. Basant Panchami is another festival on which kite-flying is common.  In Delhi, kites are flown on the Independence Day to celebrate freedom. Tricolors are the most popular kites to be flown on this day. According to Bhai Mian, the man who can rightfully be termed as one of the Godfathers’ of the art of Kite making and flying in Delhi, kites are still flown daily in Old Delhi. He also rubbishes all claims that the tradition is fading. According to him, children are as enthusiastic about kites as they used to be during his youth.Kite Flying is a popular sport in the whole of Asia. In Afghanistan , kite flying suffered till some years back when it was banned. However, now the sport is slowly reviving. In Pakistan, it often transforms into Kite Fighting and is especially popular during the spring. China, often thought to be the birthplace of kite flying, also houses Weifang, the kite flying capital of the world. China also boasts of the largest kite museum in the world.  The photograph above shows one of the kite flying expert from Indonesia.In Europe, Kite Flying is a part of the culture in Greek and Cyprus. Kites of the British Overseas Territory of Bermuda hold world records for altitude and duration. In some countries of South America, the traditions are surprisingly close to those in India. Kites are flown on Independence Day in Chile.  In Guyana, they’re flown around EasterAll over the world, kite festivals welcome international participation. Several of these festivals have been around for some years while new ones are cropping up every year. It seems the entire world is awakening to the charm of kites now.Common belief is that kites were introduced in India by a couple of Chinese Travellers. However, that is where the similarity between Indian and Chinese kites ends. Modern Indian fighter kites are completely different from elaborate Chinese versions. And lately, Chinese kites and strings have started making their appearance in Indian Markets though Bhai Mian maintains that Indian kites are better than their Chinese counterparts in maneuverability and agilitMany believe that kite flying dates back to the time of Mahabharat when they were used to pass messages from one kingdom to another.  However, the earliest evidence of Kite Flying in India is in form of miniature paintings from the Mughal Period dating back to the 1500s. There are many references of lovers delivering romantic messages to each other using kites.   Gradually kite-flying and kite-fighting evolved into full-fledged sports and kites started being flown to celebrate various occasions such as the onset of spring, the Independence Day, and Uttarayan.  And now, history is again being rewritten by dedicated festivals being organized to celebrate kites and all that they stand for. Kite festivals are celebrated all across India with great enthusiasm. The festival in Rajasthan is called the Desert Kite Festival. And along with the main festival in Jodhpur, several parallel celebrations are organized in other cities of the state. Kites also unleashed their magic towards the south. This year, in Hyderabad, the Great Hyderabad Adventure Club organized a Kite Flying festival on the 15th of January. And in Kerala, the second Kerala Kite Festival was organized on January 22nd and 23rd. All of these festivals were received with palpable excitement by the flyers. However, the biggest Kite Festival in India is perhaps the one that is organized on Makar Sankranti in Ahmedabad, Gujarat. This festival has been held every year with increasing fanfare since 1989. The numbers, sizes, shapes, and varieties of kites flown during this festival are outrageous and kite flyers from across the globe attend this festival and showcase their kites and their kite flying skills for the benefit of the others. With so many kites in the sky, it is a wonder how these kites, especially the huge, intricate ones manage to survive. Some facts about Kite Flying :)1.    The Chinese believe that when we look up at a kite in the sky, our mouth opens a bit. This helps in getting rid of the excess heat in the body and, thus, maintaining a healthy Yin-Yang Balance.2.    Japan banned kite-flying in 1760 because it was distracting too many people from their work.3.    East Germany banned large kites because it was thought that they could potentially be used to lift someone across the Berlin Wall4.    In 1855, the Russians towed torpedoes with great accuracy using kites.5.    Kite-flying is growing faster than most other sports in the world6.    Kites have been used for various purposes throughout the world. The uses include fishing, war propaganda, lifting material to workmen working on structures of great heights, lifting observers in wars, and so on.Overall it was great experience to see lot of colorful kites in the sky and looking for next year's Kite Festival in Delhi !!!

A photograph of 3D Kite flying in the sky around India Gate in Delhi !

For the first time in November 2011, the skies over India Gate in Delhi were painted in rainbow colours and decorated with myriad shapes. Kites in all shapes and sizes took over the sky and brought the city to life. The first ever Kite-Flying Festival in Delhi had opened to an overwhelming response by participants and spectators.


Every year Delhi Tourism Department organizes this wonderful festival for Kite Flying lovers and especially for kids of the country. Delhi has a long history of flying kites and all of us have some fond memories related to flying kites in our childhood. As time passes and one becomes busy with the mundane activities of everyday life, these memories are pushed behind to the back of our minds. The Kite Festival organized by Delhi Tourism brings back some of those memories. Let's check out this PHOTO JOURNEY to know more about Delhi Kite Festival.Here is how Delhi Chief Minister of Delhi expresses her viewpoint about Delhi International Kite Flying Festival -'Kite Flying has been an integral part of the culture of India and the rave response to the first Kite Flying Festival held in Delhi organized by Delhi Tourism is a proof that even in this age of Internet Technology and Social Media, kites have the ability of drag us out of our homes and go back to our childhoods for a bit. Owing to the obvious enthusiasm Delhi harbors for kites, we’ll make this an annual event and celebrate the revival of this erstwhile fading tradition year after year. I congratulate Delhi Tourism for organizing the Kite Flying Festival in Delhi and for bringing out this vibrant souvenir, which is the perfect way to commemorate the event. And I would also like to thank the people of Delhi for making it a huge success.A photograph of 3D Kite flying in the sky around India Gate in DelhiFor the first time in November 2011, the skies over India Gate in Delhi were painted in rainbow colours and decorated with myriad shapes. Kites in all shapes and sizes took over the sky and brought the city to life. The first ever Kite-Flying Festival in Delhi had opened to an overwhelming response by participants and spectators.A passionate Kite flyer from Great Britain who seemed one of the most energetic Kite-flyer on the ground. Most of the kite flyers had some assisting people with them, but he was handling multiple kites on his own. People of all ages, families, couples, and children gathered around in the lush grounds near India Gate and witnessed the unfolding of this event with awe.  It was as if Delhi had been waiting for such an event for ages.  None of the events lacked participation. From kite flying to kite fighting to other cultural events, all were teeming with participants and spectators.  The atmosphere was charged up and spirits as high as a kite can go, encouraging us to consider the possibility of holding this festival every yearThere were various types of kites flying in the sky. Here is one of the colorful kite with unique shape and the man handling this kite is a member of Chennai Kite Club.Ever since the beginning of human existence, the obsession with the sky has led to inventions after inventions to help us in our bid to conquer the sky. And it was because of this fascination that our ancestors flew the first kites.   Each movement of a kite while it’s on a flight inspires poetry. Our hearts dive when it plunges and when it soars through the sky and achieves heights we can never hope to achieve owing to our human limitations, our spirit flies with it. A kite embodies human desires and it is no wonder then that it symbolizes freedom, joy, prosperity, fortune, and all things good to us.Kite flying has been an age-old tradition in India but now with the intrusion of technology and social media, sports like kite-flying has started retreating into the shadows. Kite Festivals, held from time to time, in different parts of the country are amongst some of the initiatives to celebrate and revive this fading sport. Kites have been a part of our tradition since ancient times and even today they are flown to celebrate various festivals and sentiments. Culturally, for Indians, Kites represent everything that is good – happiness, prosperity, freedom, and peace.Makar Sankranti, the festival that celebrates the movement of the sun into the Northern Hemisphere, is all about flying kites. On this day, especially in Gujarat and Rajasthan, families flock on terraces and indulge in kite flying and fighting from sunrise to sunset and even beyond that. Basant Panchami is another festival on which kite-flying is common.  In Delhi, kites are flown on the Independence Day to celebrate freedom. Tricolors are the most popular kites to be flown on this day. According to Bhai Mian, the man who can rightfully be termed as one of the Godfathers’ of the art of Kite making and flying in Delhi, kites are still flown daily in Old Delhi. He also rubbishes all claims that the tradition is fading. According to him, children are as enthusiastic about kites as they used to be during his youth.Kite Flying is a popular sport in the whole of Asia. In Afghanistan , kite flying suffered till some years back when it was banned. However, now the sport is slowly reviving. In Pakistan, it often transforms into Kite Fighting and is especially popular during the spring. China, often thought to be the birthplace of kite flying, also houses Weifang, the kite flying capital of the world. China also boasts of the largest kite museum in the world.  The photograph above shows one of the kite flying expert from Indonesia.In Europe, Kite Flying is a part of the culture in Greek and Cyprus. Kites of the British Overseas Territory of Bermuda hold world records for altitude and duration. In some countries of South America, the traditions are surprisingly close to those in India. Kites are flown on Independence Day in Chile.  In Guyana, they’re flown around EasterAll over the world, kite festivals welcome international participation. Several of these festivals have been around for some years while new ones are cropping up every year. It seems the entire world is awakening to the charm of kites now.Common belief is that kites were introduced in India by a couple of Chinese Travellers. However, that is where the similarity between Indian and Chinese kites ends. Modern Indian fighter kites are completely different from elaborate Chinese versions. And lately, Chinese kites and strings have started making their appearance in Indian Markets though Bhai Mian maintains that Indian kites are better than their Chinese counterparts in maneuverability and agilitMany believe that kite flying dates back to the time of Mahabharat when they were used to pass messages from one kingdom to another.  However, the earliest evidence of Kite Flying in India is in form of miniature paintings from the Mughal Period dating back to the 1500s. There are many references of lovers delivering romantic messages to each other using kites.   Gradually kite-flying and kite-fighting evolved into full-fledged sports and kites started being flown to celebrate various occasions such as the onset of spring, the Independence Day, and Uttarayan.  And now, history is again being rewritten by dedicated festivals being organized to celebrate kites and all that they stand for. Kite festivals are celebrated all across India with great enthusiasm. The festival in Rajasthan is called the Desert Kite Festival. And along with the main festival in Jodhpur, several parallel celebrations are organized in other cities of the state. Kites also unleashed their magic towards the south. This year, in Hyderabad, the Great Hyderabad Adventure Club organized a Kite Flying festival on the 15th of January. And in Kerala, the second Kerala Kite Festival was organized on January 22nd and 23rd. All of these festivals were received with palpable excitement by the flyers. However, the biggest Kite Festival in India is perhaps the one that is organized on Makar Sankranti in Ahmedabad, Gujarat. This festival has been held every year with increasing fanfare since 1989. The numbers, sizes, shapes, and varieties of kites flown during this festival are outrageous and kite flyers from across the globe attend this festival and showcase their kites and their kite flying skills for the benefit of the others. With so many kites in the sky, it is a wonder how these kites, especially the huge, intricate ones manage to survive. Some facts about Kite Flying :)1.    The Chinese believe that when we look up at a kite in the sky, our mouth opens a bit. This helps in getting rid of the excess heat in the body and, thus, maintaining a healthy Yin-Yang Balance.2.    Japan banned kite-flying in 1760 because it was distracting too many people from their work.3.    East Germany banned large kites because it was thought that they could potentially be used to lift someone across the Berlin Wall4.    In 1855, the Russians towed torpedoes with great accuracy using kites.5.    Kite-flying is growing faster than most other sports in the world6.    Kites have been used for various purposes throughout the world. The uses include fishing, war propaganda, lifting material to workmen working on structures of great heights, lifting observers in wars, and so on.Overall it was great experience to see lot of colorful kites in the sky and looking for next year's Kite Festival in Delhi !!!

A passionate Kite flyer from Great Britain who seemed one of the most energetic Kite-flyer on the ground. Most of the kite flyers had some assisting people with them, but he was handling multiple kites on his own.

 People of all ages, families, couples, and children gathered around in the lush grounds near India Gate and witnessed the unfolding of this event with awe.  It was as if Delhi had been waiting for such an event for ages.   

None of the events lacked participation. From kite flying to kite fighting to other cultural events, all were teeming with participants and spectators.  The atmosphere was charged up and spirits as high as a kite can go, encouraging us to consider the possibility of holding this festival every year.
 
Every year Delhi Tourism Department organizes this wonderful festival for Kite Flying lovers and especially for kids of the country. Delhi has a long history of flying kites and all of us have some fond memories related to flying kites in our childhood. As time passes and one becomes busy with the mundane activities of everyday life, these memories are pushed behind to the back of our minds. The Kite Festival organized by Delhi Tourism brings back some of those memories. Let's check out this PHOTO JOURNEY to know more about Delhi Kite Festival.Here is how Delhi Chief Minister of Delhi expresses her viewpoint about Delhi International Kite Flying Festival -'Kite Flying has been an integral part of the culture of India and the rave response to the first Kite Flying Festival held in Delhi organized by Delhi Tourism is a proof that even in this age of Internet Technology and Social Media, kites have the ability of drag us out of our homes and go back to our childhoods for a bit. Owing to the obvious enthusiasm Delhi harbors for kites, we’ll make this an annual event and celebrate the revival of this erstwhile fading tradition year after year. I congratulate Delhi Tourism for organizing the Kite Flying Festival in Delhi and for bringing out this vibrant souvenir, which is the perfect way to commemorate the event. And I would also like to thank the people of Delhi for making it a huge success.A photograph of 3D Kite flying in the sky around India Gate in DelhiFor the first time in November 2011, the skies over India Gate in Delhi were painted in rainbow colours and decorated with myriad shapes. Kites in all shapes and sizes took over the sky and brought the city to life. The first ever Kite-Flying Festival in Delhi had opened to an overwhelming response by participants and spectators.A passionate Kite flyer from Great Britain who seemed one of the most energetic Kite-flyer on the ground. Most of the kite flyers had some assisting people with them, but he was handling multiple kites on his own. People of all ages, families, couples, and children gathered around in the lush grounds near India Gate and witnessed the unfolding of this event with awe.  It was as if Delhi had been waiting for such an event for ages.  None of the events lacked participation. From kite flying to kite fighting to other cultural events, all were teeming with participants and spectators.  The atmosphere was charged up and spirits as high as a kite can go, encouraging us to consider the possibility of holding this festival every yearThere were various types of kites flying in the sky. Here is one of the colorful kite with unique shape and the man handling this kite is a member of Chennai Kite Club.Ever since the beginning of human existence, the obsession with the sky has led to inventions after inventions to help us in our bid to conquer the sky. And it was because of this fascination that our ancestors flew the first kites.   Each movement of a kite while it’s on a flight inspires poetry. Our hearts dive when it plunges and when it soars through the sky and achieves heights we can never hope to achieve owing to our human limitations, our spirit flies with it. A kite embodies human desires and it is no wonder then that it symbolizes freedom, joy, prosperity, fortune, and all things good to us.Kite flying has been an age-old tradition in India but now with the intrusion of technology and social media, sports like kite-flying has started retreating into the shadows. Kite Festivals, held from time to time, in different parts of the country are amongst some of the initiatives to celebrate and revive this fading sport. Kites have been a part of our tradition since ancient times and even today they are flown to celebrate various festivals and sentiments. Culturally, for Indians, Kites represent everything that is good – happiness, prosperity, freedom, and peace.Makar Sankranti, the festival that celebrates the movement of the sun into the Northern Hemisphere, is all about flying kites. On this day, especially in Gujarat and Rajasthan, families flock on terraces and indulge in kite flying and fighting from sunrise to sunset and even beyond that. Basant Panchami is another festival on which kite-flying is common.  In Delhi, kites are flown on the Independence Day to celebrate freedom. Tricolors are the most popular kites to be flown on this day. According to Bhai Mian, the man who can rightfully be termed as one of the Godfathers’ of the art of Kite making and flying in Delhi, kites are still flown daily in Old Delhi. He also rubbishes all claims that the tradition is fading. According to him, children are as enthusiastic about kites as they used to be during his youth.Kite Flying is a popular sport in the whole of Asia. In Afghanistan , kite flying suffered till some years back when it was banned. However, now the sport is slowly reviving. In Pakistan, it often transforms into Kite Fighting and is especially popular during the spring. China, often thought to be the birthplace of kite flying, also houses Weifang, the kite flying capital of the world. China also boasts of the largest kite museum in the world.  The photograph above shows one of the kite flying expert from Indonesia.In Europe, Kite Flying is a part of the culture in Greek and Cyprus. Kites of the British Overseas Territory of Bermuda hold world records for altitude and duration. In some countries of South America, the traditions are surprisingly close to those in India. Kites are flown on Independence Day in Chile.  In Guyana, they’re flown around EasterAll over the world, kite festivals welcome international participation. Several of these festivals have been around for some years while new ones are cropping up every year. It seems the entire world is awakening to the charm of kites now.Common belief is that kites were introduced in India by a couple of Chinese Travellers. However, that is where the similarity between Indian and Chinese kites ends. Modern Indian fighter kites are completely different from elaborate Chinese versions. And lately, Chinese kites and strings have started making their appearance in Indian Markets though Bhai Mian maintains that Indian kites are better than their Chinese counterparts in maneuverability and agilitMany believe that kite flying dates back to the time of Mahabharat when they were used to pass messages from one kingdom to another.  However, the earliest evidence of Kite Flying in India is in form of miniature paintings from the Mughal Period dating back to the 1500s. There are many references of lovers delivering romantic messages to each other using kites.   Gradually kite-flying and kite-fighting evolved into full-fledged sports and kites started being flown to celebrate various occasions such as the onset of spring, the Independence Day, and Uttarayan.  And now, history is again being rewritten by dedicated festivals being organized to celebrate kites and all that they stand for. Kite festivals are celebrated all across India with great enthusiasm. The festival in Rajasthan is called the Desert Kite Festival. And along with the main festival in Jodhpur, several parallel celebrations are organized in other cities of the state. Kites also unleashed their magic towards the south. This year, in Hyderabad, the Great Hyderabad Adventure Club organized a Kite Flying festival on the 15th of January. And in Kerala, the second Kerala Kite Festival was organized on January 22nd and 23rd. All of these festivals were received with palpable excitement by the flyers. However, the biggest Kite Festival in India is perhaps the one that is organized on Makar Sankranti in Ahmedabad, Gujarat. This festival has been held every year with increasing fanfare since 1989. The numbers, sizes, shapes, and varieties of kites flown during this festival are outrageous and kite flyers from across the globe attend this festival and showcase their kites and their kite flying skills for the benefit of the others. With so many kites in the sky, it is a wonder how these kites, especially the huge, intricate ones manage to survive. Some facts about Kite Flying :)1.    The Chinese believe that when we look up at a kite in the sky, our mouth opens a bit. This helps in getting rid of the excess heat in the body and, thus, maintaining a healthy Yin-Yang Balance.2.    Japan banned kite-flying in 1760 because it was distracting too many people from their work.3.    East Germany banned large kites because it was thought that they could potentially be used to lift someone across the Berlin Wall4.    In 1855, the Russians towed torpedoes with great accuracy using kites.5.    Kite-flying is growing faster than most other sports in the world6.    Kites have been used for various purposes throughout the world. The uses include fishing, war propaganda, lifting material to workmen working on structures of great heights, lifting observers in wars, and so on.Overall it was great experience to see lot of colorful kites in the sky and looking for next year's Kite Festival in Delhi !!!

There were various types of kites flying in the sky. Here is one of the colorful kite with unique shape and the man handling this kite is a member of Chennai Kite Club.

Ever since the beginning of human existence, the obsession with the sky has led to inventions after inventions to help us in our bid to conquer the sky. And it was because of this fascination that our ancestors flew the first kites.  

Every year Delhi Tourism Department organizes this wonderful festival for Kite Flying lovers and especially for kids of the country. Delhi has a long history of flying kites and all of us have some fond memories related to flying kites in our childhood. As time passes and one becomes busy with the mundane activities of everyday life, these memories are pushed behind to the back of our minds. The Kite Festival organized by Delhi Tourism brings back some of those memories. Let's check out this PHOTO JOURNEY to know more about Delhi Kite Festival.Here is how Delhi Chief Minister of Delhi expresses her viewpoint about Delhi International Kite Flying Festival -'Kite Flying has been an integral part of the culture of India and the rave response to the first Kite Flying Festival held in Delhi organized by Delhi Tourism is a proof that even in this age of Internet Technology and Social Media, kites have the ability of drag us out of our homes and go back to our childhoods for a bit. Owing to the obvious enthusiasm Delhi harbors for kites, we’ll make this an annual event and celebrate the revival of this erstwhile fading tradition year after year. I congratulate Delhi Tourism for organizing the Kite Flying Festival in Delhi and for bringing out this vibrant souvenir, which is the perfect way to commemorate the event. And I would also like to thank the people of Delhi for making it a huge success.A photograph of 3D Kite flying in the sky around India Gate in DelhiFor the first time in November 2011, the skies over India Gate in Delhi were painted in rainbow colours and decorated with myriad shapes. Kites in all shapes and sizes took over the sky and brought the city to life. The first ever Kite-Flying Festival in Delhi had opened to an overwhelming response by participants and spectators.A passionate Kite flyer from Great Britain who seemed one of the most energetic Kite-flyer on the ground. Most of the kite flyers had some assisting people with them, but he was handling multiple kites on his own. People of all ages, families, couples, and children gathered around in the lush grounds near India Gate and witnessed the unfolding of this event with awe.  It was as if Delhi had been waiting for such an event for ages.  None of the events lacked participation. From kite flying to kite fighting to other cultural events, all were teeming with participants and spectators.  The atmosphere was charged up and spirits as high as a kite can go, encouraging us to consider the possibility of holding this festival every yearThere were various types of kites flying in the sky. Here is one of the colorful kite with unique shape and the man handling this kite is a member of Chennai Kite Club.Ever since the beginning of human existence, the obsession with the sky has led to inventions after inventions to help us in our bid to conquer the sky. And it was because of this fascination that our ancestors flew the first kites.   Each movement of a kite while it’s on a flight inspires poetry. Our hearts dive when it plunges and when it soars through the sky and achieves heights we can never hope to achieve owing to our human limitations, our spirit flies with it. A kite embodies human desires and it is no wonder then that it symbolizes freedom, joy, prosperity, fortune, and all things good to us.Kite flying has been an age-old tradition in India but now with the intrusion of technology and social media, sports like kite-flying has started retreating into the shadows. Kite Festivals, held from time to time, in different parts of the country are amongst some of the initiatives to celebrate and revive this fading sport. Kites have been a part of our tradition since ancient times and even today they are flown to celebrate various festivals and sentiments. Culturally, for Indians, Kites represent everything that is good – happiness, prosperity, freedom, and peace.Makar Sankranti, the festival that celebrates the movement of the sun into the Northern Hemisphere, is all about flying kites. On this day, especially in Gujarat and Rajasthan, families flock on terraces and indulge in kite flying and fighting from sunrise to sunset and even beyond that. Basant Panchami is another festival on which kite-flying is common.  In Delhi, kites are flown on the Independence Day to celebrate freedom. Tricolors are the most popular kites to be flown on this day. According to Bhai Mian, the man who can rightfully be termed as one of the Godfathers’ of the art of Kite making and flying in Delhi, kites are still flown daily in Old Delhi. He also rubbishes all claims that the tradition is fading. According to him, children are as enthusiastic about kites as they used to be during his youth.Kite Flying is a popular sport in the whole of Asia. In Afghanistan , kite flying suffered till some years back when it was banned. However, now the sport is slowly reviving. In Pakistan, it often transforms into Kite Fighting and is especially popular during the spring. China, often thought to be the birthplace of kite flying, also houses Weifang, the kite flying capital of the world. China also boasts of the largest kite museum in the world.  The photograph above shows one of the kite flying expert from Indonesia.In Europe, Kite Flying is a part of the culture in Greek and Cyprus. Kites of the British Overseas Territory of Bermuda hold world records for altitude and duration. In some countries of South America, the traditions are surprisingly close to those in India. Kites are flown on Independence Day in Chile.  In Guyana, they’re flown around EasterAll over the world, kite festivals welcome international participation. Several of these festivals have been around for some years while new ones are cropping up every year. It seems the entire world is awakening to the charm of kites now.Common belief is that kites were introduced in India by a couple of Chinese Travellers. However, that is where the similarity between Indian and Chinese kites ends. Modern Indian fighter kites are completely different from elaborate Chinese versions. And lately, Chinese kites and strings have started making their appearance in Indian Markets though Bhai Mian maintains that Indian kites are better than their Chinese counterparts in maneuverability and agilitMany believe that kite flying dates back to the time of Mahabharat when they were used to pass messages from one kingdom to another.  However, the earliest evidence of Kite Flying in India is in form of miniature paintings from the Mughal Period dating back to the 1500s. There are many references of lovers delivering romantic messages to each other using kites.   Gradually kite-flying and kite-fighting evolved into full-fledged sports and kites started being flown to celebrate various occasions such as the onset of spring, the Independence Day, and Uttarayan.  And now, history is again being rewritten by dedicated festivals being organized to celebrate kites and all that they stand for. Kite festivals are celebrated all across India with great enthusiasm. The festival in Rajasthan is called the Desert Kite Festival. And along with the main festival in Jodhpur, several parallel celebrations are organized in other cities of the state. Kites also unleashed their magic towards the south. This year, in Hyderabad, the Great Hyderabad Adventure Club organized a Kite Flying festival on the 15th of January. And in Kerala, the second Kerala Kite Festival was organized on January 22nd and 23rd. All of these festivals were received with palpable excitement by the flyers. However, the biggest Kite Festival in India is perhaps the one that is organized on Makar Sankranti in Ahmedabad, Gujarat. This festival has been held every year with increasing fanfare since 1989. The numbers, sizes, shapes, and varieties of kites flown during this festival are outrageous and kite flyers from across the globe attend this festival and showcase their kites and their kite flying skills for the benefit of the others. With so many kites in the sky, it is a wonder how these kites, especially the huge, intricate ones manage to survive. Some facts about Kite Flying :)1.    The Chinese believe that when we look up at a kite in the sky, our mouth opens a bit. This helps in getting rid of the excess heat in the body and, thus, maintaining a healthy Yin-Yang Balance.2.    Japan banned kite-flying in 1760 because it was distracting too many people from their work.3.    East Germany banned large kites because it was thought that they could potentially be used to lift someone across the Berlin Wall4.    In 1855, the Russians towed torpedoes with great accuracy using kites.5.    Kite-flying is growing faster than most other sports in the world6.    Kites have been used for various purposes throughout the world. The uses include fishing, war propaganda, lifting material to workmen working on structures of great heights, lifting observers in wars, and so on.Overall it was great experience to see lot of colorful kites in the sky and looking for next year's Kite Festival in Delhi !!!

 Each movement of a kite while it’s on a flight inspires poetry. Our hearts dive when it plunges and when it soars through the sky and achieves heights we can never hope to achieve owing to our human limitations, our spirit flies with it. A kite embodies human desires and it is no wonder then that it symbolizes freedom, joy, prosperity, fortune, and all things good to us.

Every year Delhi Tourism Department organizes this wonderful festival for Kite Flying lovers and especially for kids of the country. Delhi has a long history of flying kites and all of us have some fond memories related to flying kites in our childhood. As time passes and one becomes busy with the mundane activities of everyday life, these memories are pushed behind to the back of our minds. The Kite Festival organized by Delhi Tourism brings back some of those memories. Let's check out this PHOTO JOURNEY to know more about Delhi Kite Festival.Here is how Delhi Chief Minister of Delhi expresses her viewpoint about Delhi International Kite Flying Festival -'Kite Flying has been an integral part of the culture of India and the rave response to the first Kite Flying Festival held in Delhi organized by Delhi Tourism is a proof that even in this age of Internet Technology and Social Media, kites have the ability of drag us out of our homes and go back to our childhoods for a bit. Owing to the obvious enthusiasm Delhi harbors for kites, we’ll make this an annual event and celebrate the revival of this erstwhile fading tradition year after year. I congratulate Delhi Tourism for organizing the Kite Flying Festival in Delhi and for bringing out this vibrant souvenir, which is the perfect way to commemorate the event. And I would also like to thank the people of Delhi for making it a huge success.A photograph of 3D Kite flying in the sky around India Gate in DelhiFor the first time in November 2011, the skies over India Gate in Delhi were painted in rainbow colours and decorated with myriad shapes. Kites in all shapes and sizes took over the sky and brought the city to life. The first ever Kite-Flying Festival in Delhi had opened to an overwhelming response by participants and spectators.A passionate Kite flyer from Great Britain who seemed one of the most energetic Kite-flyer on the ground. Most of the kite flyers had some assisting people with them, but he was handling multiple kites on his own. People of all ages, families, couples, and children gathered around in the lush grounds near India Gate and witnessed the unfolding of this event with awe.  It was as if Delhi had been waiting for such an event for ages.  None of the events lacked participation. From kite flying to kite fighting to other cultural events, all were teeming with participants and spectators.  The atmosphere was charged up and spirits as high as a kite can go, encouraging us to consider the possibility of holding this festival every yearThere were various types of kites flying in the sky. Here is one of the colorful kite with unique shape and the man handling this kite is a member of Chennai Kite Club.Ever since the beginning of human existence, the obsession with the sky has led to inventions after inventions to help us in our bid to conquer the sky. And it was because of this fascination that our ancestors flew the first kites.   Each movement of a kite while it’s on a flight inspires poetry. Our hearts dive when it plunges and when it soars through the sky and achieves heights we can never hope to achieve owing to our human limitations, our spirit flies with it. A kite embodies human desires and it is no wonder then that it symbolizes freedom, joy, prosperity, fortune, and all things good to us.Kite flying has been an age-old tradition in India but now with the intrusion of technology and social media, sports like kite-flying has started retreating into the shadows. Kite Festivals, held from time to time, in different parts of the country are amongst some of the initiatives to celebrate and revive this fading sport. Kites have been a part of our tradition since ancient times and even today they are flown to celebrate various festivals and sentiments. Culturally, for Indians, Kites represent everything that is good – happiness, prosperity, freedom, and peace.Makar Sankranti, the festival that celebrates the movement of the sun into the Northern Hemisphere, is all about flying kites. On this day, especially in Gujarat and Rajasthan, families flock on terraces and indulge in kite flying and fighting from sunrise to sunset and even beyond that. Basant Panchami is another festival on which kite-flying is common.  In Delhi, kites are flown on the Independence Day to celebrate freedom. Tricolors are the most popular kites to be flown on this day. According to Bhai Mian, the man who can rightfully be termed as one of the Godfathers’ of the art of Kite making and flying in Delhi, kites are still flown daily in Old Delhi. He also rubbishes all claims that the tradition is fading. According to him, children are as enthusiastic about kites as they used to be during his youth.Kite Flying is a popular sport in the whole of Asia. In Afghanistan , kite flying suffered till some years back when it was banned. However, now the sport is slowly reviving. In Pakistan, it often transforms into Kite Fighting and is especially popular during the spring. China, often thought to be the birthplace of kite flying, also houses Weifang, the kite flying capital of the world. China also boasts of the largest kite museum in the world.  The photograph above shows one of the kite flying expert from Indonesia.In Europe, Kite Flying is a part of the culture in Greek and Cyprus. Kites of the British Overseas Territory of Bermuda hold world records for altitude and duration. In some countries of South America, the traditions are surprisingly close to those in India. Kites are flown on Independence Day in Chile.  In Guyana, they’re flown around EasterAll over the world, kite festivals welcome international participation. Several of these festivals have been around for some years while new ones are cropping up every year. It seems the entire world is awakening to the charm of kites now.Common belief is that kites were introduced in India by a couple of Chinese Travellers. However, that is where the similarity between Indian and Chinese kites ends. Modern Indian fighter kites are completely different from elaborate Chinese versions. And lately, Chinese kites and strings have started making their appearance in Indian Markets though Bhai Mian maintains that Indian kites are better than their Chinese counterparts in maneuverability and agilitMany believe that kite flying dates back to the time of Mahabharat when they were used to pass messages from one kingdom to another.  However, the earliest evidence of Kite Flying in India is in form of miniature paintings from the Mughal Period dating back to the 1500s. There are many references of lovers delivering romantic messages to each other using kites.   Gradually kite-flying and kite-fighting evolved into full-fledged sports and kites started being flown to celebrate various occasions such as the onset of spring, the Independence Day, and Uttarayan.  And now, history is again being rewritten by dedicated festivals being organized to celebrate kites and all that they stand for. Kite festivals are celebrated all across India with great enthusiasm. The festival in Rajasthan is called the Desert Kite Festival. And along with the main festival in Jodhpur, several parallel celebrations are organized in other cities of the state. Kites also unleashed their magic towards the south. This year, in Hyderabad, the Great Hyderabad Adventure Club organized a Kite Flying festival on the 15th of January. And in Kerala, the second Kerala Kite Festival was organized on January 22nd and 23rd. All of these festivals were received with palpable excitement by the flyers. However, the biggest Kite Festival in India is perhaps the one that is organized on Makar Sankranti in Ahmedabad, Gujarat. This festival has been held every year with increasing fanfare since 1989. The numbers, sizes, shapes, and varieties of kites flown during this festival are outrageous and kite flyers from across the globe attend this festival and showcase their kites and their kite flying skills for the benefit of the others. With so many kites in the sky, it is a wonder how these kites, especially the huge, intricate ones manage to survive. Some facts about Kite Flying :)1.    The Chinese believe that when we look up at a kite in the sky, our mouth opens a bit. This helps in getting rid of the excess heat in the body and, thus, maintaining a healthy Yin-Yang Balance.2.    Japan banned kite-flying in 1760 because it was distracting too many people from their work.3.    East Germany banned large kites because it was thought that they could potentially be used to lift someone across the Berlin Wall4.    In 1855, the Russians towed torpedoes with great accuracy using kites.5.    Kite-flying is growing faster than most other sports in the world6.    Kites have been used for various purposes throughout the world. The uses include fishing, war propaganda, lifting material to workmen working on structures of great heights, lifting observers in wars, and so on.Overall it was great experience to see lot of colorful kites in the sky and looking for next year's Kite Festival in Delhi !!!

Kite flying has been an age-old tradition in India but now with the intrusion of technology and social media, sports like kite-flying has started retreating into the shadows. Kite Festivals, held from time to time, in different parts of the country are amongst some of the initiatives to celebrate and revive this fading sport. 

Every year Delhi Tourism Department organizes this wonderful festival for Kite Flying lovers and especially for kids of the country. Delhi has a long history of flying kites and all of us have some fond memories related to flying kites in our childhood. As time passes and one becomes busy with the mundane activities of everyday life, these memories are pushed behind to the back of our minds. The Kite Festival organized by Delhi Tourism brings back some of those memories. Let's check out this PHOTO JOURNEY to know more about Delhi Kite Festival.Here is how Delhi Chief Minister of Delhi expresses her viewpoint about Delhi International Kite Flying Festival -'Kite Flying has been an integral part of the culture of India and the rave response to the first Kite Flying Festival held in Delhi organized by Delhi Tourism is a proof that even in this age of Internet Technology and Social Media, kites have the ability of drag us out of our homes and go back to our childhoods for a bit. Owing to the obvious enthusiasm Delhi harbors for kites, we’ll make this an annual event and celebrate the revival of this erstwhile fading tradition year after year. I congratulate Delhi Tourism for organizing the Kite Flying Festival in Delhi and for bringing out this vibrant souvenir, which is the perfect way to commemorate the event. And I would also like to thank the people of Delhi for making it a huge success.A photograph of 3D Kite flying in the sky around India Gate in DelhiFor the first time in November 2011, the skies over India Gate in Delhi were painted in rainbow colours and decorated with myriad shapes. Kites in all shapes and sizes took over the sky and brought the city to life. The first ever Kite-Flying Festival in Delhi had opened to an overwhelming response by participants and spectators.A passionate Kite flyer from Great Britain who seemed one of the most energetic Kite-flyer on the ground. Most of the kite flyers had some assisting people with them, but he was handling multiple kites on his own. People of all ages, families, couples, and children gathered around in the lush grounds near India Gate and witnessed the unfolding of this event with awe.  It was as if Delhi had been waiting for such an event for ages.  None of the events lacked participation. From kite flying to kite fighting to other cultural events, all were teeming with participants and spectators.  The atmosphere was charged up and spirits as high as a kite can go, encouraging us to consider the possibility of holding this festival every yearThere were various types of kites flying in the sky. Here is one of the colorful kite with unique shape and the man handling this kite is a member of Chennai Kite Club.Ever since the beginning of human existence, the obsession with the sky has led to inventions after inventions to help us in our bid to conquer the sky. And it was because of this fascination that our ancestors flew the first kites.   Each movement of a kite while it’s on a flight inspires poetry. Our hearts dive when it plunges and when it soars through the sky and achieves heights we can never hope to achieve owing to our human limitations, our spirit flies with it. A kite embodies human desires and it is no wonder then that it symbolizes freedom, joy, prosperity, fortune, and all things good to us.Kite flying has been an age-old tradition in India but now with the intrusion of technology and social media, sports like kite-flying has started retreating into the shadows. Kite Festivals, held from time to time, in different parts of the country are amongst some of the initiatives to celebrate and revive this fading sport. Kites have been a part of our tradition since ancient times and even today they are flown to celebrate various festivals and sentiments. Culturally, for Indians, Kites represent everything that is good – happiness, prosperity, freedom, and peace.Makar Sankranti, the festival that celebrates the movement of the sun into the Northern Hemisphere, is all about flying kites. On this day, especially in Gujarat and Rajasthan, families flock on terraces and indulge in kite flying and fighting from sunrise to sunset and even beyond that. Basant Panchami is another festival on which kite-flying is common.  In Delhi, kites are flown on the Independence Day to celebrate freedom. Tricolors are the most popular kites to be flown on this day. According to Bhai Mian, the man who can rightfully be termed as one of the Godfathers’ of the art of Kite making and flying in Delhi, kites are still flown daily in Old Delhi. He also rubbishes all claims that the tradition is fading. According to him, children are as enthusiastic about kites as they used to be during his youth.Kite Flying is a popular sport in the whole of Asia. In Afghanistan , kite flying suffered till some years back when it was banned. However, now the sport is slowly reviving. In Pakistan, it often transforms into Kite Fighting and is especially popular during the spring. China, often thought to be the birthplace of kite flying, also houses Weifang, the kite flying capital of the world. China also boasts of the largest kite museum in the world.  The photograph above shows one of the kite flying expert from Indonesia.In Europe, Kite Flying is a part of the culture in Greek and Cyprus. Kites of the British Overseas Territory of Bermuda hold world records for altitude and duration. In some countries of South America, the traditions are surprisingly close to those in India. Kites are flown on Independence Day in Chile.  In Guyana, they’re flown around EasterAll over the world, kite festivals welcome international participation. Several of these festivals have been around for some years while new ones are cropping up every year. It seems the entire world is awakening to the charm of kites now.Common belief is that kites were introduced in India by a couple of Chinese Travellers. However, that is where the similarity between Indian and Chinese kites ends. Modern Indian fighter kites are completely different from elaborate Chinese versions. And lately, Chinese kites and strings have started making their appearance in Indian Markets though Bhai Mian maintains that Indian kites are better than their Chinese counterparts in maneuverability and agilitMany believe that kite flying dates back to the time of Mahabharat when they were used to pass messages from one kingdom to another.  However, the earliest evidence of Kite Flying in India is in form of miniature paintings from the Mughal Period dating back to the 1500s. There are many references of lovers delivering romantic messages to each other using kites.   Gradually kite-flying and kite-fighting evolved into full-fledged sports and kites started being flown to celebrate various occasions such as the onset of spring, the Independence Day, and Uttarayan.  And now, history is again being rewritten by dedicated festivals being organized to celebrate kites and all that they stand for. Kite festivals are celebrated all across India with great enthusiasm. The festival in Rajasthan is called the Desert Kite Festival. And along with the main festival in Jodhpur, several parallel celebrations are organized in other cities of the state. Kites also unleashed their magic towards the south. This year, in Hyderabad, the Great Hyderabad Adventure Club organized a Kite Flying festival on the 15th of January. And in Kerala, the second Kerala Kite Festival was organized on January 22nd and 23rd. All of these festivals were received with palpable excitement by the flyers. However, the biggest Kite Festival in India is perhaps the one that is organized on Makar Sankranti in Ahmedabad, Gujarat. This festival has been held every year with increasing fanfare since 1989. The numbers, sizes, shapes, and varieties of kites flown during this festival are outrageous and kite flyers from across the globe attend this festival and showcase their kites and their kite flying skills for the benefit of the others. With so many kites in the sky, it is a wonder how these kites, especially the huge, intricate ones manage to survive. Some facts about Kite Flying :)1.    The Chinese believe that when we look up at a kite in the sky, our mouth opens a bit. This helps in getting rid of the excess heat in the body and, thus, maintaining a healthy Yin-Yang Balance.2.    Japan banned kite-flying in 1760 because it was distracting too many people from their work.3.    East Germany banned large kites because it was thought that they could potentially be used to lift someone across the Berlin Wall4.    In 1855, the Russians towed torpedoes with great accuracy using kites.5.    Kite-flying is growing faster than most other sports in the world6.    Kites have been used for various purposes throughout the world. The uses include fishing, war propaganda, lifting material to workmen working on structures of great heights, lifting observers in wars, and so on.Overall it was great experience to see lot of colorful kites in the sky and looking for next year's Kite Festival in Delhi !!!

Kites have been a part of our tradition since ancient times and even today they are flown to celebrate various festivals and sentiments. Culturally, for Indians, Kites represent everything that is good – happiness, prosperity, freedom, and peace. 

Makar Sankranti, the festival that celebrates the movement of the sun into the Northern Hemisphere, is all about flying kites. On this day, especially in Gujarat and Rajasthan, families flock on terraces and indulge in kite flying and fighting from sunrise to sunset and even beyond that. Basant Panchami is another festival on which kite-flying is common. 
 
Every year Delhi Tourism Department organizes this wonderful festival for Kite Flying lovers and especially for kids of the country. Delhi has a long history of flying kites and all of us have some fond memories related to flying kites in our childhood. As time passes and one becomes busy with the mundane activities of everyday life, these memories are pushed behind to the back of our minds. The Kite Festival organized by Delhi Tourism brings back some of those memories. Let's check out this PHOTO JOURNEY to know more about Delhi Kite Festival.Here is how Delhi Chief Minister of Delhi expresses her viewpoint about Delhi International Kite Flying Festival -'Kite Flying has been an integral part of the culture of India and the rave response to the first Kite Flying Festival held in Delhi organized by Delhi Tourism is a proof that even in this age of Internet Technology and Social Media, kites have the ability of drag us out of our homes and go back to our childhoods for a bit. Owing to the obvious enthusiasm Delhi harbors for kites, we’ll make this an annual event and celebrate the revival of this erstwhile fading tradition year after year. I congratulate Delhi Tourism for organizing the Kite Flying Festival in Delhi and for bringing out this vibrant souvenir, which is the perfect way to commemorate the event. And I would also like to thank the people of Delhi for making it a huge success.A photograph of 3D Kite flying in the sky around India Gate in DelhiFor the first time in November 2011, the skies over India Gate in Delhi were painted in rainbow colours and decorated with myriad shapes. Kites in all shapes and sizes took over the sky and brought the city to life. The first ever Kite-Flying Festival in Delhi had opened to an overwhelming response by participants and spectators.A passionate Kite flyer from Great Britain who seemed one of the most energetic Kite-flyer on the ground. Most of the kite flyers had some assisting people with them, but he was handling multiple kites on his own. People of all ages, families, couples, and children gathered around in the lush grounds near India Gate and witnessed the unfolding of this event with awe.  It was as if Delhi had been waiting for such an event for ages.  None of the events lacked participation. From kite flying to kite fighting to other cultural events, all were teeming with participants and spectators.  The atmosphere was charged up and spirits as high as a kite can go, encouraging us to consider the possibility of holding this festival every yearThere were various types of kites flying in the sky. Here is one of the colorful kite with unique shape and the man handling this kite is a member of Chennai Kite Club.Ever since the beginning of human existence, the obsession with the sky has led to inventions after inventions to help us in our bid to conquer the sky. And it was because of this fascination that our ancestors flew the first kites.   Each movement of a kite while it’s on a flight inspires poetry. Our hearts dive when it plunges and when it soars through the sky and achieves heights we can never hope to achieve owing to our human limitations, our spirit flies with it. A kite embodies human desires and it is no wonder then that it symbolizes freedom, joy, prosperity, fortune, and all things good to us.Kite flying has been an age-old tradition in India but now with the intrusion of technology and social media, sports like kite-flying has started retreating into the shadows. Kite Festivals, held from time to time, in different parts of the country are amongst some of the initiatives to celebrate and revive this fading sport. Kites have been a part of our tradition since ancient times and even today they are flown to celebrate various festivals and sentiments. Culturally, for Indians, Kites represent everything that is good – happiness, prosperity, freedom, and peace.Makar Sankranti, the festival that celebrates the movement of the sun into the Northern Hemisphere, is all about flying kites. On this day, especially in Gujarat and Rajasthan, families flock on terraces and indulge in kite flying and fighting from sunrise to sunset and even beyond that. Basant Panchami is another festival on which kite-flying is common.  In Delhi, kites are flown on the Independence Day to celebrate freedom. Tricolors are the most popular kites to be flown on this day. According to Bhai Mian, the man who can rightfully be termed as one of the Godfathers’ of the art of Kite making and flying in Delhi, kites are still flown daily in Old Delhi. He also rubbishes all claims that the tradition is fading. According to him, children are as enthusiastic about kites as they used to be during his youth.Kite Flying is a popular sport in the whole of Asia. In Afghanistan , kite flying suffered till some years back when it was banned. However, now the sport is slowly reviving. In Pakistan, it often transforms into Kite Fighting and is especially popular during the spring. China, often thought to be the birthplace of kite flying, also houses Weifang, the kite flying capital of the world. China also boasts of the largest kite museum in the world.  The photograph above shows one of the kite flying expert from Indonesia.In Europe, Kite Flying is a part of the culture in Greek and Cyprus. Kites of the British Overseas Territory of Bermuda hold world records for altitude and duration. In some countries of South America, the traditions are surprisingly close to those in India. Kites are flown on Independence Day in Chile.  In Guyana, they’re flown around EasterAll over the world, kite festivals welcome international participation. Several of these festivals have been around for some years while new ones are cropping up every year. It seems the entire world is awakening to the charm of kites now.Common belief is that kites were introduced in India by a couple of Chinese Travellers. However, that is where the similarity between Indian and Chinese kites ends. Modern Indian fighter kites are completely different from elaborate Chinese versions. And lately, Chinese kites and strings have started making their appearance in Indian Markets though Bhai Mian maintains that Indian kites are better than their Chinese counterparts in maneuverability and agilitMany believe that kite flying dates back to the time of Mahabharat when they were used to pass messages from one kingdom to another.  However, the earliest evidence of Kite Flying in India is in form of miniature paintings from the Mughal Period dating back to the 1500s. There are many references of lovers delivering romantic messages to each other using kites.   Gradually kite-flying and kite-fighting evolved into full-fledged sports and kites started being flown to celebrate various occasions such as the onset of spring, the Independence Day, and Uttarayan.  And now, history is again being rewritten by dedicated festivals being organized to celebrate kites and all that they stand for. Kite festivals are celebrated all across India with great enthusiasm. The festival in Rajasthan is called the Desert Kite Festival. And along with the main festival in Jodhpur, several parallel celebrations are organized in other cities of the state. Kites also unleashed their magic towards the south. This year, in Hyderabad, the Great Hyderabad Adventure Club organized a Kite Flying festival on the 15th of January. And in Kerala, the second Kerala Kite Festival was organized on January 22nd and 23rd. All of these festivals were received with palpable excitement by the flyers. However, the biggest Kite Festival in India is perhaps the one that is organized on Makar Sankranti in Ahmedabad, Gujarat. This festival has been held every year with increasing fanfare since 1989. The numbers, sizes, shapes, and varieties of kites flown during this festival are outrageous and kite flyers from across the globe attend this festival and showcase their kites and their kite flying skills for the benefit of the others. With so many kites in the sky, it is a wonder how these kites, especially the huge, intricate ones manage to survive. Some facts about Kite Flying :)1.    The Chinese believe that when we look up at a kite in the sky, our mouth opens a bit. This helps in getting rid of the excess heat in the body and, thus, maintaining a healthy Yin-Yang Balance.2.    Japan banned kite-flying in 1760 because it was distracting too many people from their work.3.    East Germany banned large kites because it was thought that they could potentially be used to lift someone across the Berlin Wall4.    In 1855, the Russians towed torpedoes with great accuracy using kites.5.    Kite-flying is growing faster than most other sports in the world6.    Kites have been used for various purposes throughout the world. The uses include fishing, war propaganda, lifting material to workmen working on structures of great heights, lifting observers in wars, and so on.Overall it was great experience to see lot of colorful kites in the sky and looking for next year's Kite Festival in Delhi !!!
 In Delhi, kites are flown on the Independence Day to celebrate freedom. Tricolors are the most popular kites to be flown on this day. According to Bhai Mian, the man who can rightfully be termed as one of the Godfathers’ of the art of Kite making and flying in Delhi, kites are still flown daily in Old Delhi. He also rubbishes all claims that the tradition is fading. According to him, children are as enthusiastic about kites as they used to be during his youth.
Every year Delhi Tourism Department organizes this wonderful festival for Kite Flying lovers and especially for kids of the country. Delhi has a long history of flying kites and all of us have some fond memories related to flying kites in our childhood. As time passes and one becomes busy with the mundane activities of everyday life, these memories are pushed behind to the back of our minds. The Kite Festival organized by Delhi Tourism brings back some of those memories. Let's check out this PHOTO JOURNEY to know more about Delhi Kite Festival.Here is how Delhi Chief Minister of Delhi expresses her viewpoint about Delhi International Kite Flying Festival -'Kite Flying has been an integral part of the culture of India and the rave response to the first Kite Flying Festival held in Delhi organized by Delhi Tourism is a proof that even in this age of Internet Technology and Social Media, kites have the ability of drag us out of our homes and go back to our childhoods for a bit. Owing to the obvious enthusiasm Delhi harbors for kites, we’ll make this an annual event and celebrate the revival of this erstwhile fading tradition year after year. I congratulate Delhi Tourism for organizing the Kite Flying Festival in Delhi and for bringing out this vibrant souvenir, which is the perfect way to commemorate the event. And I would also like to thank the people of Delhi for making it a huge success.A photograph of 3D Kite flying in the sky around India Gate in DelhiFor the first time in November 2011, the skies over India Gate in Delhi were painted in rainbow colours and decorated with myriad shapes. Kites in all shapes and sizes took over the sky and brought the city to life. The first ever Kite-Flying Festival in Delhi had opened to an overwhelming response by participants and spectators.A passionate Kite flyer from Great Britain who seemed one of the most energetic Kite-flyer on the ground. Most of the kite flyers had some assisting people with them, but he was handling multiple kites on his own. People of all ages, families, couples, and children gathered around in the lush grounds near India Gate and witnessed the unfolding of this event with awe.  It was as if Delhi had been waiting for such an event for ages.  None of the events lacked participation. From kite flying to kite fighting to other cultural events, all were teeming with participants and spectators.  The atmosphere was charged up and spirits as high as a kite can go, encouraging us to consider the possibility of holding this festival every yearThere were various types of kites flying in the sky. Here is one of the colorful kite with unique shape and the man handling this kite is a member of Chennai Kite Club.Ever since the beginning of human existence, the obsession with the sky has led to inventions after inventions to help us in our bid to conquer the sky. And it was because of this fascination that our ancestors flew the first kites.   Each movement of a kite while it’s on a flight inspires poetry. Our hearts dive when it plunges and when it soars through the sky and achieves heights we can never hope to achieve owing to our human limitations, our spirit flies with it. A kite embodies human desires and it is no wonder then that it symbolizes freedom, joy, prosperity, fortune, and all things good to us.Kite flying has been an age-old tradition in India but now with the intrusion of technology and social media, sports like kite-flying has started retreating into the shadows. Kite Festivals, held from time to time, in different parts of the country are amongst some of the initiatives to celebrate and revive this fading sport. Kites have been a part of our tradition since ancient times and even today they are flown to celebrate various festivals and sentiments. Culturally, for Indians, Kites represent everything that is good – happiness, prosperity, freedom, and peace.Makar Sankranti, the festival that celebrates the movement of the sun into the Northern Hemisphere, is all about flying kites. On this day, especially in Gujarat and Rajasthan, families flock on terraces and indulge in kite flying and fighting from sunrise to sunset and even beyond that. Basant Panchami is another festival on which kite-flying is common.  In Delhi, kites are flown on the Independence Day to celebrate freedom. Tricolors are the most popular kites to be flown on this day. According to Bhai Mian, the man who can rightfully be termed as one of the Godfathers’ of the art of Kite making and flying in Delhi, kites are still flown daily in Old Delhi. He also rubbishes all claims that the tradition is fading. According to him, children are as enthusiastic about kites as they used to be during his youth.Kite Flying is a popular sport in the whole of Asia. In Afghanistan , kite flying suffered till some years back when it was banned. However, now the sport is slowly reviving. In Pakistan, it often transforms into Kite Fighting and is especially popular during the spring. China, often thought to be the birthplace of kite flying, also houses Weifang, the kite flying capital of the world. China also boasts of the largest kite museum in the world.  The photograph above shows one of the kite flying expert from Indonesia.In Europe, Kite Flying is a part of the culture in Greek and Cyprus. Kites of the British Overseas Territory of Bermuda hold world records for altitude and duration. In some countries of South America, the traditions are surprisingly close to those in India. Kites are flown on Independence Day in Chile.  In Guyana, they’re flown around EasterAll over the world, kite festivals welcome international participation. Several of these festivals have been around for some years while new ones are cropping up every year. It seems the entire world is awakening to the charm of kites now.Common belief is that kites were introduced in India by a couple of Chinese Travellers. However, that is where the similarity between Indian and Chinese kites ends. Modern Indian fighter kites are completely different from elaborate Chinese versions. And lately, Chinese kites and strings have started making their appearance in Indian Markets though Bhai Mian maintains that Indian kites are better than their Chinese counterparts in maneuverability and agilitMany believe that kite flying dates back to the time of Mahabharat when they were used to pass messages from one kingdom to another.  However, the earliest evidence of Kite Flying in India is in form of miniature paintings from the Mughal Period dating back to the 1500s. There are many references of lovers delivering romantic messages to each other using kites.   Gradually kite-flying and kite-fighting evolved into full-fledged sports and kites started being flown to celebrate various occasions such as the onset of spring, the Independence Day, and Uttarayan.  And now, history is again being rewritten by dedicated festivals being organized to celebrate kites and all that they stand for. Kite festivals are celebrated all across India with great enthusiasm. The festival in Rajasthan is called the Desert Kite Festival. And along with the main festival in Jodhpur, several parallel celebrations are organized in other cities of the state. Kites also unleashed their magic towards the south. This year, in Hyderabad, the Great Hyderabad Adventure Club organized a Kite Flying festival on the 15th of January. And in Kerala, the second Kerala Kite Festival was organized on January 22nd and 23rd. All of these festivals were received with palpable excitement by the flyers. However, the biggest Kite Festival in India is perhaps the one that is organized on Makar Sankranti in Ahmedabad, Gujarat. This festival has been held every year with increasing fanfare since 1989. The numbers, sizes, shapes, and varieties of kites flown during this festival are outrageous and kite flyers from across the globe attend this festival and showcase their kites and their kite flying skills for the benefit of the others. With so many kites in the sky, it is a wonder how these kites, especially the huge, intricate ones manage to survive. Some facts about Kite Flying :)1.    The Chinese believe that when we look up at a kite in the sky, our mouth opens a bit. This helps in getting rid of the excess heat in the body and, thus, maintaining a healthy Yin-Yang Balance.2.    Japan banned kite-flying in 1760 because it was distracting too many people from their work.3.    East Germany banned large kites because it was thought that they could potentially be used to lift someone across the Berlin Wall4.    In 1855, the Russians towed torpedoes with great accuracy using kites.5.    Kite-flying is growing faster than most other sports in the world6.    Kites have been used for various purposes throughout the world. The uses include fishing, war propaganda, lifting material to workmen working on structures of great heights, lifting observers in wars, and so on.Overall it was great experience to see lot of colorful kites in the sky and looking for next year's Kite Festival in Delhi !!!

Kite Flying is a popular sport in the whole of Asia. In Afghanistan , kite flying suffered till some years back when it was banned. However, now the sport is slowly reviving. In Pakistan, it often transforms into Kite Fighting and is especially popular during the spring. China, often thought to be the birthplace of kite flying, also houses Weifang, the kite flying capital of the world. China also boasts of the largest kite museum in the world.  

The photograph above shows one of the kite flying expert from Indonesia.

Every year Delhi Tourism Department organizes this wonderful festival for Kite Flying lovers and especially for kids of the country. Delhi has a long history of flying kites and all of us have some fond memories related to flying kites in our childhood. As time passes and one becomes busy with the mundane activities of everyday life, these memories are pushed behind to the back of our minds. The Kite Festival organized by Delhi Tourism brings back some of those memories. Let's check out this PHOTO JOURNEY to know more about Delhi Kite Festival.Here is how Delhi Chief Minister of Delhi expresses her viewpoint about Delhi International Kite Flying Festival -'Kite Flying has been an integral part of the culture of India and the rave response to the first Kite Flying Festival held in Delhi organized by Delhi Tourism is a proof that even in this age of Internet Technology and Social Media, kites have the ability of drag us out of our homes and go back to our childhoods for a bit. Owing to the obvious enthusiasm Delhi harbors for kites, we’ll make this an annual event and celebrate the revival of this erstwhile fading tradition year after year. I congratulate Delhi Tourism for organizing the Kite Flying Festival in Delhi and for bringing out this vibrant souvenir, which is the perfect way to commemorate the event. And I would also like to thank the people of Delhi for making it a huge success.A photograph of 3D Kite flying in the sky around India Gate in DelhiFor the first time in November 2011, the skies over India Gate in Delhi were painted in rainbow colours and decorated with myriad shapes. Kites in all shapes and sizes took over the sky and brought the city to life. The first ever Kite-Flying Festival in Delhi had opened to an overwhelming response by participants and spectators.A passionate Kite flyer from Great Britain who seemed one of the most energetic Kite-flyer on the ground. Most of the kite flyers had some assisting people with them, but he was handling multiple kites on his own. People of all ages, families, couples, and children gathered around in the lush grounds near India Gate and witnessed the unfolding of this event with awe.  It was as if Delhi had been waiting for such an event for ages.  None of the events lacked participation. From kite flying to kite fighting to other cultural events, all were teeming with participants and spectators.  The atmosphere was charged up and spirits as high as a kite can go, encouraging us to consider the possibility of holding this festival every yearThere were various types of kites flying in the sky. Here is one of the colorful kite with unique shape and the man handling this kite is a member of Chennai Kite Club.Ever since the beginning of human existence, the obsession with the sky has led to inventions after inventions to help us in our bid to conquer the sky. And it was because of this fascination that our ancestors flew the first kites.   Each movement of a kite while it’s on a flight inspires poetry. Our hearts dive when it plunges and when it soars through the sky and achieves heights we can never hope to achieve owing to our human limitations, our spirit flies with it. A kite embodies human desires and it is no wonder then that it symbolizes freedom, joy, prosperity, fortune, and all things good to us.Kite flying has been an age-old tradition in India but now with the intrusion of technology and social media, sports like kite-flying has started retreating into the shadows. Kite Festivals, held from time to time, in different parts of the country are amongst some of the initiatives to celebrate and revive this fading sport. Kites have been a part of our tradition since ancient times and even today they are flown to celebrate various festivals and sentiments. Culturally, for Indians, Kites represent everything that is good – happiness, prosperity, freedom, and peace.Makar Sankranti, the festival that celebrates the movement of the sun into the Northern Hemisphere, is all about flying kites. On this day, especially in Gujarat and Rajasthan, families flock on terraces and indulge in kite flying and fighting from sunrise to sunset and even beyond that. Basant Panchami is another festival on which kite-flying is common.  In Delhi, kites are flown on the Independence Day to celebrate freedom. Tricolors are the most popular kites to be flown on this day. According to Bhai Mian, the man who can rightfully be termed as one of the Godfathers’ of the art of Kite making and flying in Delhi, kites are still flown daily in Old Delhi. He also rubbishes all claims that the tradition is fading. According to him, children are as enthusiastic about kites as they used to be during his youth.Kite Flying is a popular sport in the whole of Asia. In Afghanistan , kite flying suffered till some years back when it was banned. However, now the sport is slowly reviving. In Pakistan, it often transforms into Kite Fighting and is especially popular during the spring. China, often thought to be the birthplace of kite flying, also houses Weifang, the kite flying capital of the world. China also boasts of the largest kite museum in the world.  The photograph above shows one of the kite flying expert from Indonesia.In Europe, Kite Flying is a part of the culture in Greek and Cyprus. Kites of the British Overseas Territory of Bermuda hold world records for altitude and duration. In some countries of South America, the traditions are surprisingly close to those in India. Kites are flown on Independence Day in Chile.  In Guyana, they’re flown around EasterAll over the world, kite festivals welcome international participation. Several of these festivals have been around for some years while new ones are cropping up every year. It seems the entire world is awakening to the charm of kites now.Common belief is that kites were introduced in India by a couple of Chinese Travellers. However, that is where the similarity between Indian and Chinese kites ends. Modern Indian fighter kites are completely different from elaborate Chinese versions. And lately, Chinese kites and strings have started making their appearance in Indian Markets though Bhai Mian maintains that Indian kites are better than their Chinese counterparts in maneuverability and agilitMany believe that kite flying dates back to the time of Mahabharat when they were used to pass messages from one kingdom to another.  However, the earliest evidence of Kite Flying in India is in form of miniature paintings from the Mughal Period dating back to the 1500s. There are many references of lovers delivering romantic messages to each other using kites.   Gradually kite-flying and kite-fighting evolved into full-fledged sports and kites started being flown to celebrate various occasions such as the onset of spring, the Independence Day, and Uttarayan.  And now, history is again being rewritten by dedicated festivals being organized to celebrate kites and all that they stand for. Kite festivals are celebrated all across India with great enthusiasm. The festival in Rajasthan is called the Desert Kite Festival. And along with the main festival in Jodhpur, several parallel celebrations are organized in other cities of the state. Kites also unleashed their magic towards the south. This year, in Hyderabad, the Great Hyderabad Adventure Club organized a Kite Flying festival on the 15th of January. And in Kerala, the second Kerala Kite Festival was organized on January 22nd and 23rd. All of these festivals were received with palpable excitement by the flyers. However, the biggest Kite Festival in India is perhaps the one that is organized on Makar Sankranti in Ahmedabad, Gujarat. This festival has been held every year with increasing fanfare since 1989. The numbers, sizes, shapes, and varieties of kites flown during this festival are outrageous and kite flyers from across the globe attend this festival and showcase their kites and their kite flying skills for the benefit of the others. With so many kites in the sky, it is a wonder how these kites, especially the huge, intricate ones manage to survive. Some facts about Kite Flying :)1.    The Chinese believe that when we look up at a kite in the sky, our mouth opens a bit. This helps in getting rid of the excess heat in the body and, thus, maintaining a healthy Yin-Yang Balance.2.    Japan banned kite-flying in 1760 because it was distracting too many people from their work.3.    East Germany banned large kites because it was thought that they could potentially be used to lift someone across the Berlin Wall4.    In 1855, the Russians towed torpedoes with great accuracy using kites.5.    Kite-flying is growing faster than most other sports in the world6.    Kites have been used for various purposes throughout the world. The uses include fishing, war propaganda, lifting material to workmen working on structures of great heights, lifting observers in wars, and so on.Overall it was great experience to see lot of colorful kites in the sky and looking for next year's Kite Festival in Delhi !!!

In Europe, Kite Flying is a part of the culture in Greek and Cyprus. Kites of the British Overseas Territory of Bermuda hold world records for altitude and duration. In some countries of South America, the traditions are surprisingly close to those in India. Kites are flown on Independence Day in Chile.  In Guyana, they’re flown around Easter.
All over the world, kite festivals welcome international participation. Several of these festivals have been around for some years while new ones are cropping up every year. It seems the entire world is awakening to the charm of kites now.

Every year Delhi Tourism Department organizes this wonderful festival for Kite Flying lovers and especially for kids of the country. Delhi has a long history of flying kites and all of us have some fond memories related to flying kites in our childhood. As time passes and one becomes busy with the mundane activities of everyday life, these memories are pushed behind to the back of our minds. The Kite Festival organized by Delhi Tourism brings back some of those memories. Let's check out this PHOTO JOURNEY to know more about Delhi Kite Festival.Here is how Delhi Chief Minister of Delhi expresses her viewpoint about Delhi International Kite Flying Festival -'Kite Flying has been an integral part of the culture of India and the rave response to the first Kite Flying Festival held in Delhi organized by Delhi Tourism is a proof that even in this age of Internet Technology and Social Media, kites have the ability of drag us out of our homes and go back to our childhoods for a bit. Owing to the obvious enthusiasm Delhi harbors for kites, we’ll make this an annual event and celebrate the revival of this erstwhile fading tradition year after year. I congratulate Delhi Tourism for organizing the Kite Flying Festival in Delhi and for bringing out this vibrant souvenir, which is the perfect way to commemorate the event. And I would also like to thank the people of Delhi for making it a huge success.A photograph of 3D Kite flying in the sky around India Gate in DelhiFor the first time in November 2011, the skies over India Gate in Delhi were painted in rainbow colours and decorated with myriad shapes. Kites in all shapes and sizes took over the sky and brought the city to life. The first ever Kite-Flying Festival in Delhi had opened to an overwhelming response by participants and spectators.A passionate Kite flyer from Great Britain who seemed one of the most energetic Kite-flyer on the ground. Most of the kite flyers had some assisting people with them, but he was handling multiple kites on his own. People of all ages, families, couples, and children gathered around in the lush grounds near India Gate and witnessed the unfolding of this event with awe.  It was as if Delhi had been waiting for such an event for ages.  None of the events lacked participation. From kite flying to kite fighting to other cultural events, all were teeming with participants and spectators.  The atmosphere was charged up and spirits as high as a kite can go, encouraging us to consider the possibility of holding this festival every yearThere were various types of kites flying in the sky. Here is one of the colorful kite with unique shape and the man handling this kite is a member of Chennai Kite Club.Ever since the beginning of human existence, the obsession with the sky has led to inventions after inventions to help us in our bid to conquer the sky. And it was because of this fascination that our ancestors flew the first kites.   Each movement of a kite while it’s on a flight inspires poetry. Our hearts dive when it plunges and when it soars through the sky and achieves heights we can never hope to achieve owing to our human limitations, our spirit flies with it. A kite embodies human desires and it is no wonder then that it symbolizes freedom, joy, prosperity, fortune, and all things good to us.Kite flying has been an age-old tradition in India but now with the intrusion of technology and social media, sports like kite-flying has started retreating into the shadows. Kite Festivals, held from time to time, in different parts of the country are amongst some of the initiatives to celebrate and revive this fading sport. Kites have been a part of our tradition since ancient times and even today they are flown to celebrate various festivals and sentiments. Culturally, for Indians, Kites represent everything that is good – happiness, prosperity, freedom, and peace.Makar Sankranti, the festival that celebrates the movement of the sun into the Northern Hemisphere, is all about flying kites. On this day, especially in Gujarat and Rajasthan, families flock on terraces and indulge in kite flying and fighting from sunrise to sunset and even beyond that. Basant Panchami is another festival on which kite-flying is common.  In Delhi, kites are flown on the Independence Day to celebrate freedom. Tricolors are the most popular kites to be flown on this day. According to Bhai Mian, the man who can rightfully be termed as one of the Godfathers’ of the art of Kite making and flying in Delhi, kites are still flown daily in Old Delhi. He also rubbishes all claims that the tradition is fading. According to him, children are as enthusiastic about kites as they used to be during his youth.Kite Flying is a popular sport in the whole of Asia. In Afghanistan , kite flying suffered till some years back when it was banned. However, now the sport is slowly reviving. In Pakistan, it often transforms into Kite Fighting and is especially popular during the spring. China, often thought to be the birthplace of kite flying, also houses Weifang, the kite flying capital of the world. China also boasts of the largest kite museum in the world.  The photograph above shows one of the kite flying expert from Indonesia.In Europe, Kite Flying is a part of the culture in Greek and Cyprus. Kites of the British Overseas Territory of Bermuda hold world records for altitude and duration. In some countries of South America, the traditions are surprisingly close to those in India. Kites are flown on Independence Day in Chile.  In Guyana, they’re flown around EasterAll over the world, kite festivals welcome international participation. Several of these festivals have been around for some years while new ones are cropping up every year. It seems the entire world is awakening to the charm of kites now.Common belief is that kites were introduced in India by a couple of Chinese Travellers. However, that is where the similarity between Indian and Chinese kites ends. Modern Indian fighter kites are completely different from elaborate Chinese versions. And lately, Chinese kites and strings have started making their appearance in Indian Markets though Bhai Mian maintains that Indian kites are better than their Chinese counterparts in maneuverability and agilitMany believe that kite flying dates back to the time of Mahabharat when they were used to pass messages from one kingdom to another.  However, the earliest evidence of Kite Flying in India is in form of miniature paintings from the Mughal Period dating back to the 1500s. There are many references of lovers delivering romantic messages to each other using kites.   Gradually kite-flying and kite-fighting evolved into full-fledged sports and kites started being flown to celebrate various occasions such as the onset of spring, the Independence Day, and Uttarayan.  And now, history is again being rewritten by dedicated festivals being organized to celebrate kites and all that they stand for. Kite festivals are celebrated all across India with great enthusiasm. The festival in Rajasthan is called the Desert Kite Festival. And along with the main festival in Jodhpur, several parallel celebrations are organized in other cities of the state. Kites also unleashed their magic towards the south. This year, in Hyderabad, the Great Hyderabad Adventure Club organized a Kite Flying festival on the 15th of January. And in Kerala, the second Kerala Kite Festival was organized on January 22nd and 23rd. All of these festivals were received with palpable excitement by the flyers. However, the biggest Kite Festival in India is perhaps the one that is organized on Makar Sankranti in Ahmedabad, Gujarat. This festival has been held every year with increasing fanfare since 1989. The numbers, sizes, shapes, and varieties of kites flown during this festival are outrageous and kite flyers from across the globe attend this festival and showcase their kites and their kite flying skills for the benefit of the others. With so many kites in the sky, it is a wonder how these kites, especially the huge, intricate ones manage to survive. Some facts about Kite Flying :)1.    The Chinese believe that when we look up at a kite in the sky, our mouth opens a bit. This helps in getting rid of the excess heat in the body and, thus, maintaining a healthy Yin-Yang Balance.2.    Japan banned kite-flying in 1760 because it was distracting too many people from their work.3.    East Germany banned large kites because it was thought that they could potentially be used to lift someone across the Berlin Wall4.    In 1855, the Russians towed torpedoes with great accuracy using kites.5.    Kite-flying is growing faster than most other sports in the world6.    Kites have been used for various purposes throughout the world. The uses include fishing, war propaganda, lifting material to workmen working on structures of great heights, lifting observers in wars, and so on.Overall it was great experience to see lot of colorful kites in the sky and looking for next year's Kite Festival in Delhi !!!

Common belief is that kites were introduced in India by a couple of Chinese Travellers. However, that is where the similarity between Indian and Chinese kites ends. Modern Indian fighter kites are completely different from elaborate Chinese versions. And lately, Chinese kites and strings have started making their appearance in Indian Markets though Bhai Mian maintains that Indian kites are better than their Chinese counterparts in maneuverability and agility

Every year Delhi Tourism Department organizes this wonderful festival for Kite Flying lovers and especially for kids of the country. Delhi has a long history of flying kites and all of us have some fond memories related to flying kites in our childhood. As time passes and one becomes busy with the mundane activities of everyday life, these memories are pushed behind to the back of our minds. The Kite Festival organized by Delhi Tourism brings back some of those memories. Let's check out this PHOTO JOURNEY to know more about Delhi Kite Festival.Here is how Delhi Chief Minister of Delhi expresses her viewpoint about Delhi International Kite Flying Festival -'Kite Flying has been an integral part of the culture of India and the rave response to the first Kite Flying Festival held in Delhi organized by Delhi Tourism is a proof that even in this age of Internet Technology and Social Media, kites have the ability of drag us out of our homes and go back to our childhoods for a bit. Owing to the obvious enthusiasm Delhi harbors for kites, we’ll make this an annual event and celebrate the revival of this erstwhile fading tradition year after year. I congratulate Delhi Tourism for organizing the Kite Flying Festival in Delhi and for bringing out this vibrant souvenir, which is the perfect way to commemorate the event. And I would also like to thank the people of Delhi for making it a huge success.A photograph of 3D Kite flying in the sky around India Gate in DelhiFor the first time in November 2011, the skies over India Gate in Delhi were painted in rainbow colours and decorated with myriad shapes. Kites in all shapes and sizes took over the sky and brought the city to life. The first ever Kite-Flying Festival in Delhi had opened to an overwhelming response by participants and spectators.A passionate Kite flyer from Great Britain who seemed one of the most energetic Kite-flyer on the ground. Most of the kite flyers had some assisting people with them, but he was handling multiple kites on his own. People of all ages, families, couples, and children gathered around in the lush grounds near India Gate and witnessed the unfolding of this event with awe.  It was as if Delhi had been waiting for such an event for ages.  None of the events lacked participation. From kite flying to kite fighting to other cultural events, all were teeming with participants and spectators.  The atmosphere was charged up and spirits as high as a kite can go, encouraging us to consider the possibility of holding this festival every yearThere were various types of kites flying in the sky. Here is one of the colorful kite with unique shape and the man handling this kite is a member of Chennai Kite Club.Ever since the beginning of human existence, the obsession with the sky has led to inventions after inventions to help us in our bid to conquer the sky. And it was because of this fascination that our ancestors flew the first kites.   Each movement of a kite while it’s on a flight inspires poetry. Our hearts dive when it plunges and when it soars through the sky and achieves heights we can never hope to achieve owing to our human limitations, our spirit flies with it. A kite embodies human desires and it is no wonder then that it symbolizes freedom, joy, prosperity, fortune, and all things good to us.Kite flying has been an age-old tradition in India but now with the intrusion of technology and social media, sports like kite-flying has started retreating into the shadows. Kite Festivals, held from time to time, in different parts of the country are amongst some of the initiatives to celebrate and revive this fading sport. Kites have been a part of our tradition since ancient times and even today they are flown to celebrate various festivals and sentiments. Culturally, for Indians, Kites represent everything that is good – happiness, prosperity, freedom, and peace.Makar Sankranti, the festival that celebrates the movement of the sun into the Northern Hemisphere, is all about flying kites. On this day, especially in Gujarat and Rajasthan, families flock on terraces and indulge in kite flying and fighting from sunrise to sunset and even beyond that. Basant Panchami is another festival on which kite-flying is common.  In Delhi, kites are flown on the Independence Day to celebrate freedom. Tricolors are the most popular kites to be flown on this day. According to Bhai Mian, the man who can rightfully be termed as one of the Godfathers’ of the art of Kite making and flying in Delhi, kites are still flown daily in Old Delhi. He also rubbishes all claims that the tradition is fading. According to him, children are as enthusiastic about kites as they used to be during his youth.Kite Flying is a popular sport in the whole of Asia. In Afghanistan , kite flying suffered till some years back when it was banned. However, now the sport is slowly reviving. In Pakistan, it often transforms into Kite Fighting and is especially popular during the spring. China, often thought to be the birthplace of kite flying, also houses Weifang, the kite flying capital of the world. China also boasts of the largest kite museum in the world.  The photograph above shows one of the kite flying expert from Indonesia.In Europe, Kite Flying is a part of the culture in Greek and Cyprus. Kites of the British Overseas Territory of Bermuda hold world records for altitude and duration. In some countries of South America, the traditions are surprisingly close to those in India. Kites are flown on Independence Day in Chile.  In Guyana, they’re flown around EasterAll over the world, kite festivals welcome international participation. Several of these festivals have been around for some years while new ones are cropping up every year. It seems the entire world is awakening to the charm of kites now.Common belief is that kites were introduced in India by a couple of Chinese Travellers. However, that is where the similarity between Indian and Chinese kites ends. Modern Indian fighter kites are completely different from elaborate Chinese versions. And lately, Chinese kites and strings have started making their appearance in Indian Markets though Bhai Mian maintains that Indian kites are better than their Chinese counterparts in maneuverability and agilitMany believe that kite flying dates back to the time of Mahabharat when they were used to pass messages from one kingdom to another.  However, the earliest evidence of Kite Flying in India is in form of miniature paintings from the Mughal Period dating back to the 1500s. There are many references of lovers delivering romantic messages to each other using kites.   Gradually kite-flying and kite-fighting evolved into full-fledged sports and kites started being flown to celebrate various occasions such as the onset of spring, the Independence Day, and Uttarayan.  And now, history is again being rewritten by dedicated festivals being organized to celebrate kites and all that they stand for. Kite festivals are celebrated all across India with great enthusiasm. The festival in Rajasthan is called the Desert Kite Festival. And along with the main festival in Jodhpur, several parallel celebrations are organized in other cities of the state. Kites also unleashed their magic towards the south. This year, in Hyderabad, the Great Hyderabad Adventure Club organized a Kite Flying festival on the 15th of January. And in Kerala, the second Kerala Kite Festival was organized on January 22nd and 23rd. All of these festivals were received with palpable excitement by the flyers. However, the biggest Kite Festival in India is perhaps the one that is organized on Makar Sankranti in Ahmedabad, Gujarat. This festival has been held every year with increasing fanfare since 1989. The numbers, sizes, shapes, and varieties of kites flown during this festival are outrageous and kite flyers from across the globe attend this festival and showcase their kites and their kite flying skills for the benefit of the others. With so many kites in the sky, it is a wonder how these kites, especially the huge, intricate ones manage to survive. Some facts about Kite Flying :)1.    The Chinese believe that when we look up at a kite in the sky, our mouth opens a bit. This helps in getting rid of the excess heat in the body and, thus, maintaining a healthy Yin-Yang Balance.2.    Japan banned kite-flying in 1760 because it was distracting too many people from their work.3.    East Germany banned large kites because it was thought that they could potentially be used to lift someone across the Berlin Wall4.    In 1855, the Russians towed torpedoes with great accuracy using kites.5.    Kite-flying is growing faster than most other sports in the world6.    Kites have been used for various purposes throughout the world. The uses include fishing, war propaganda, lifting material to workmen working on structures of great heights, lifting observers in wars, and so on.Overall it was great experience to see lot of colorful kites in the sky and looking for next year's Kite Festival in Delhi !!!

Many believe that kite flying dates back to the time of Mahabharat when they were used to pass messages from one kingdom to another.  However, the earliest evidence of Kite Flying in India is in form of miniature paintings from the Mughal Period dating back to the 1500s. There are many references of lovers delivering romantic messages to each other using kites.   

Every year Delhi Tourism Department organizes this wonderful festival for Kite Flying lovers and especially for kids of the country. Delhi has a long history of flying kites and all of us have some fond memories related to flying kites in our childhood. As time passes and one becomes busy with the mundane activities of everyday life, these memories are pushed behind to the back of our minds. The Kite Festival organized by Delhi Tourism brings back some of those memories. Let's check out this PHOTO JOURNEY to know more about Delhi Kite Festival.Here is how Delhi Chief Minister of Delhi expresses her viewpoint about Delhi International Kite Flying Festival -'Kite Flying has been an integral part of the culture of India and the rave response to the first Kite Flying Festival held in Delhi organized by Delhi Tourism is a proof that even in this age of Internet Technology and Social Media, kites have the ability of drag us out of our homes and go back to our childhoods for a bit. Owing to the obvious enthusiasm Delhi harbors for kites, we’ll make this an annual event and celebrate the revival of this erstwhile fading tradition year after year. I congratulate Delhi Tourism for organizing the Kite Flying Festival in Delhi and for bringing out this vibrant souvenir, which is the perfect way to commemorate the event. And I would also like to thank the people of Delhi for making it a huge success.A photograph of 3D Kite flying in the sky around India Gate in DelhiFor the first time in November 2011, the skies over India Gate in Delhi were painted in rainbow colours and decorated with myriad shapes. Kites in all shapes and sizes took over the sky and brought the city to life. The first ever Kite-Flying Festival in Delhi had opened to an overwhelming response by participants and spectators.A passionate Kite flyer from Great Britain who seemed one of the most energetic Kite-flyer on the ground. Most of the kite flyers had some assisting people with them, but he was handling multiple kites on his own. People of all ages, families, couples, and children gathered around in the lush grounds near India Gate and witnessed the unfolding of this event with awe.  It was as if Delhi had been waiting for such an event for ages.  None of the events lacked participation. From kite flying to kite fighting to other cultural events, all were teeming with participants and spectators.  The atmosphere was charged up and spirits as high as a kite can go, encouraging us to consider the possibility of holding this festival every yearThere were various types of kites flying in the sky. Here is one of the colorful kite with unique shape and the man handling this kite is a member of Chennai Kite Club.Ever since the beginning of human existence, the obsession with the sky has led to inventions after inventions to help us in our bid to conquer the sky. And it was because of this fascination that our ancestors flew the first kites.   Each movement of a kite while it’s on a flight inspires poetry. Our hearts dive when it plunges and when it soars through the sky and achieves heights we can never hope to achieve owing to our human limitations, our spirit flies with it. A kite embodies human desires and it is no wonder then that it symbolizes freedom, joy, prosperity, fortune, and all things good to us.Kite flying has been an age-old tradition in India but now with the intrusion of technology and social media, sports like kite-flying has started retreating into the shadows. Kite Festivals, held from time to time, in different parts of the country are amongst some of the initiatives to celebrate and revive this fading sport. Kites have been a part of our tradition since ancient times and even today they are flown to celebrate various festivals and sentiments. Culturally, for Indians, Kites represent everything that is good – happiness, prosperity, freedom, and peace.Makar Sankranti, the festival that celebrates the movement of the sun into the Northern Hemisphere, is all about flying kites. On this day, especially in Gujarat and Rajasthan, families flock on terraces and indulge in kite flying and fighting from sunrise to sunset and even beyond that. Basant Panchami is another festival on which kite-flying is common.  In Delhi, kites are flown on the Independence Day to celebrate freedom. Tricolors are the most popular kites to be flown on this day. According to Bhai Mian, the man who can rightfully be termed as one of the Godfathers’ of the art of Kite making and flying in Delhi, kites are still flown daily in Old Delhi. He also rubbishes all claims that the tradition is fading. According to him, children are as enthusiastic about kites as they used to be during his youth.Kite Flying is a popular sport in the whole of Asia. In Afghanistan , kite flying suffered till some years back when it was banned. However, now the sport is slowly reviving. In Pakistan, it often transforms into Kite Fighting and is especially popular during the spring. China, often thought to be the birthplace of kite flying, also houses Weifang, the kite flying capital of the world. China also boasts of the largest kite museum in the world.  The photograph above shows one of the kite flying expert from Indonesia.In Europe, Kite Flying is a part of the culture in Greek and Cyprus. Kites of the British Overseas Territory of Bermuda hold world records for altitude and duration. In some countries of South America, the traditions are surprisingly close to those in India. Kites are flown on Independence Day in Chile.  In Guyana, they’re flown around EasterAll over the world, kite festivals welcome international participation. Several of these festivals have been around for some years while new ones are cropping up every year. It seems the entire world is awakening to the charm of kites now.Common belief is that kites were introduced in India by a couple of Chinese Travellers. However, that is where the similarity between Indian and Chinese kites ends. Modern Indian fighter kites are completely different from elaborate Chinese versions. And lately, Chinese kites and strings have started making their appearance in Indian Markets though Bhai Mian maintains that Indian kites are better than their Chinese counterparts in maneuverability and agilitMany believe that kite flying dates back to the time of Mahabharat when they were used to pass messages from one kingdom to another.  However, the earliest evidence of Kite Flying in India is in form of miniature paintings from the Mughal Period dating back to the 1500s. There are many references of lovers delivering romantic messages to each other using kites.   Gradually kite-flying and kite-fighting evolved into full-fledged sports and kites started being flown to celebrate various occasions such as the onset of spring, the Independence Day, and Uttarayan.  And now, history is again being rewritten by dedicated festivals being organized to celebrate kites and all that they stand for. Kite festivals are celebrated all across India with great enthusiasm. The festival in Rajasthan is called the Desert Kite Festival. And along with the main festival in Jodhpur, several parallel celebrations are organized in other cities of the state. Kites also unleashed their magic towards the south. This year, in Hyderabad, the Great Hyderabad Adventure Club organized a Kite Flying festival on the 15th of January. And in Kerala, the second Kerala Kite Festival was organized on January 22nd and 23rd. All of these festivals were received with palpable excitement by the flyers. However, the biggest Kite Festival in India is perhaps the one that is organized on Makar Sankranti in Ahmedabad, Gujarat. This festival has been held every year with increasing fanfare since 1989. The numbers, sizes, shapes, and varieties of kites flown during this festival are outrageous and kite flyers from across the globe attend this festival and showcase their kites and their kite flying skills for the benefit of the others. With so many kites in the sky, it is a wonder how these kites, especially the huge, intricate ones manage to survive. Some facts about Kite Flying :)1.    The Chinese believe that when we look up at a kite in the sky, our mouth opens a bit. This helps in getting rid of the excess heat in the body and, thus, maintaining a healthy Yin-Yang Balance.2.    Japan banned kite-flying in 1760 because it was distracting too many people from their work.3.    East Germany banned large kites because it was thought that they could potentially be used to lift someone across the Berlin Wall4.    In 1855, the Russians towed torpedoes with great accuracy using kites.5.    Kite-flying is growing faster than most other sports in the world6.    Kites have been used for various purposes throughout the world. The uses include fishing, war propaganda, lifting material to workmen working on structures of great heights, lifting observers in wars, and so on.Overall it was great experience to see lot of colorful kites in the sky and looking for next year's Kite Festival in Delhi !!!

Gradually kite-flying and kite-fighting evolved into full-fledged sports and kites started being flown to celebrate various occasions such as the onset of spring, the Independence Day, and Uttarayan.  And now, history is again being rewritten by dedicated festivals being organized to celebrate kites and all that they stand for. 

Every year Delhi Tourism Department organizes this wonderful festival for Kite Flying lovers and especially for kids of the country. Delhi has a long history of flying kites and all of us have some fond memories related to flying kites in our childhood. As time passes and one becomes busy with the mundane activities of everyday life, these memories are pushed behind to the back of our minds. The Kite Festival organized by Delhi Tourism brings back some of those memories. Let's check out this PHOTO JOURNEY to know more about Delhi Kite Festival.Here is how Delhi Chief Minister of Delhi expresses her viewpoint about Delhi International Kite Flying Festival -'Kite Flying has been an integral part of the culture of India and the rave response to the first Kite Flying Festival held in Delhi organized by Delhi Tourism is a proof that even in this age of Internet Technology and Social Media, kites have the ability of drag us out of our homes and go back to our childhoods for a bit. Owing to the obvious enthusiasm Delhi harbors for kites, we’ll make this an annual event and celebrate the revival of this erstwhile fading tradition year after year. I congratulate Delhi Tourism for organizing the Kite Flying Festival in Delhi and for bringing out this vibrant souvenir, which is the perfect way to commemorate the event. And I would also like to thank the people of Delhi for making it a huge success.A photograph of 3D Kite flying in the sky around India Gate in DelhiFor the first time in November 2011, the skies over India Gate in Delhi were painted in rainbow colours and decorated with myriad shapes. Kites in all shapes and sizes took over the sky and brought the city to life. The first ever Kite-Flying Festival in Delhi had opened to an overwhelming response by participants and spectators.A passionate Kite flyer from Great Britain who seemed one of the most energetic Kite-flyer on the ground. Most of the kite flyers had some assisting people with them, but he was handling multiple kites on his own. People of all ages, families, couples, and children gathered around in the lush grounds near India Gate and witnessed the unfolding of this event with awe.  It was as if Delhi had been waiting for such an event for ages.  None of the events lacked participation. From kite flying to kite fighting to other cultural events, all were teeming with participants and spectators.  The atmosphere was charged up and spirits as high as a kite can go, encouraging us to consider the possibility of holding this festival every yearThere were various types of kites flying in the sky. Here is one of the colorful kite with unique shape and the man handling this kite is a member of Chennai Kite Club.Ever since the beginning of human existence, the obsession with the sky has led to inventions after inventions to help us in our bid to conquer the sky. And it was because of this fascination that our ancestors flew the first kites.   Each movement of a kite while it’s on a flight inspires poetry. Our hearts dive when it plunges and when it soars through the sky and achieves heights we can never hope to achieve owing to our human limitations, our spirit flies with it. A kite embodies human desires and it is no wonder then that it symbolizes freedom, joy, prosperity, fortune, and all things good to us.Kite flying has been an age-old tradition in India but now with the intrusion of technology and social media, sports like kite-flying has started retreating into the shadows. Kite Festivals, held from time to time, in different parts of the country are amongst some of the initiatives to celebrate and revive this fading sport. Kites have been a part of our tradition since ancient times and even today they are flown to celebrate various festivals and sentiments. Culturally, for Indians, Kites represent everything that is good – happiness, prosperity, freedom, and peace.Makar Sankranti, the festival that celebrates the movement of the sun into the Northern Hemisphere, is all about flying kites. On this day, especially in Gujarat and Rajasthan, families flock on terraces and indulge in kite flying and fighting from sunrise to sunset and even beyond that. Basant Panchami is another festival on which kite-flying is common.  In Delhi, kites are flown on the Independence Day to celebrate freedom. Tricolors are the most popular kites to be flown on this day. According to Bhai Mian, the man who can rightfully be termed as one of the Godfathers’ of the art of Kite making and flying in Delhi, kites are still flown daily in Old Delhi. He also rubbishes all claims that the tradition is fading. According to him, children are as enthusiastic about kites as they used to be during his youth.Kite Flying is a popular sport in the whole of Asia. In Afghanistan , kite flying suffered till some years back when it was banned. However, now the sport is slowly reviving. In Pakistan, it often transforms into Kite Fighting and is especially popular during the spring. China, often thought to be the birthplace of kite flying, also houses Weifang, the kite flying capital of the world. China also boasts of the largest kite museum in the world.  The photograph above shows one of the kite flying expert from Indonesia.In Europe, Kite Flying is a part of the culture in Greek and Cyprus. Kites of the British Overseas Territory of Bermuda hold world records for altitude and duration. In some countries of South America, the traditions are surprisingly close to those in India. Kites are flown on Independence Day in Chile.  In Guyana, they’re flown around EasterAll over the world, kite festivals welcome international participation. Several of these festivals have been around for some years while new ones are cropping up every year. It seems the entire world is awakening to the charm of kites now.Common belief is that kites were introduced in India by a couple of Chinese Travellers. However, that is where the similarity between Indian and Chinese kites ends. Modern Indian fighter kites are completely different from elaborate Chinese versions. And lately, Chinese kites and strings have started making their appearance in Indian Markets though Bhai Mian maintains that Indian kites are better than their Chinese counterparts in maneuverability and agilitMany believe that kite flying dates back to the time of Mahabharat when they were used to pass messages from one kingdom to another.  However, the earliest evidence of Kite Flying in India is in form of miniature paintings from the Mughal Period dating back to the 1500s. There are many references of lovers delivering romantic messages to each other using kites.   Gradually kite-flying and kite-fighting evolved into full-fledged sports and kites started being flown to celebrate various occasions such as the onset of spring, the Independence Day, and Uttarayan.  And now, history is again being rewritten by dedicated festivals being organized to celebrate kites and all that they stand for. Kite festivals are celebrated all across India with great enthusiasm. The festival in Rajasthan is called the Desert Kite Festival. And along with the main festival in Jodhpur, several parallel celebrations are organized in other cities of the state. Kites also unleashed their magic towards the south. This year, in Hyderabad, the Great Hyderabad Adventure Club organized a Kite Flying festival on the 15th of January. And in Kerala, the second Kerala Kite Festival was organized on January 22nd and 23rd. All of these festivals were received with palpable excitement by the flyers. However, the biggest Kite Festival in India is perhaps the one that is organized on Makar Sankranti in Ahmedabad, Gujarat. This festival has been held every year with increasing fanfare since 1989. The numbers, sizes, shapes, and varieties of kites flown during this festival are outrageous and kite flyers from across the globe attend this festival and showcase their kites and their kite flying skills for the benefit of the others. With so many kites in the sky, it is a wonder how these kites, especially the huge, intricate ones manage to survive. Some facts about Kite Flying :)1.    The Chinese believe that when we look up at a kite in the sky, our mouth opens a bit. This helps in getting rid of the excess heat in the body and, thus, maintaining a healthy Yin-Yang Balance.2.    Japan banned kite-flying in 1760 because it was distracting too many people from their work.3.    East Germany banned large kites because it was thought that they could potentially be used to lift someone across the Berlin Wall4.    In 1855, the Russians towed torpedoes with great accuracy using kites.5.    Kite-flying is growing faster than most other sports in the world6.    Kites have been used for various purposes throughout the world. The uses include fishing, war propaganda, lifting material to workmen working on structures of great heights, lifting observers in wars, and so on.Overall it was great experience to see lot of colorful kites in the sky and looking for next year's Kite Festival in Delhi !!!

Kite festivals are celebrated all across India with great enthusiasm. The festival in Rajasthan is called the Desert Kite Festival. And along with the main festival in Jodhpur, several parallel celebrations are organized in other cities of the state. Kites also unleashed their magic towards the south. This year, in Hyderabad, the Great Hyderabad Adventure Club organized a Kite Flying festival on the 15th of January. And in Kerala, the second Kerala Kite Festival was organized on January 22nd and 23rd. All of these festivals were received with palpable excitement by the flyers. 

Every year Delhi Tourism Department organizes this wonderful festival for Kite Flying lovers and especially for kids of the country. Delhi has a long history of flying kites and all of us have some fond memories related to flying kites in our childhood. As time passes and one becomes busy with the mundane activities of everyday life, these memories are pushed behind to the back of our minds. The Kite Festival organized by Delhi Tourism brings back some of those memories. Let's check out this PHOTO JOURNEY to know more about Delhi Kite Festival.Here is how Delhi Chief Minister of Delhi expresses her viewpoint about Delhi International Kite Flying Festival -'Kite Flying has been an integral part of the culture of India and the rave response to the first Kite Flying Festival held in Delhi organized by Delhi Tourism is a proof that even in this age of Internet Technology and Social Media, kites have the ability of drag us out of our homes and go back to our childhoods for a bit. Owing to the obvious enthusiasm Delhi harbors for kites, we’ll make this an annual event and celebrate the revival of this erstwhile fading tradition year after year. I congratulate Delhi Tourism for organizing the Kite Flying Festival in Delhi and for bringing out this vibrant souvenir, which is the perfect way to commemorate the event. And I would also like to thank the people of Delhi for making it a huge success.A photograph of 3D Kite flying in the sky around India Gate in DelhiFor the first time in November 2011, the skies over India Gate in Delhi were painted in rainbow colours and decorated with myriad shapes. Kites in all shapes and sizes took over the sky and brought the city to life. The first ever Kite-Flying Festival in Delhi had opened to an overwhelming response by participants and spectators.A passionate Kite flyer from Great Britain who seemed one of the most energetic Kite-flyer on the ground. Most of the kite flyers had some assisting people with them, but he was handling multiple kites on his own. People of all ages, families, couples, and children gathered around in the lush grounds near India Gate and witnessed the unfolding of this event with awe.  It was as if Delhi had been waiting for such an event for ages.  None of the events lacked participation. From kite flying to kite fighting to other cultural events, all were teeming with participants and spectators.  The atmosphere was charged up and spirits as high as a kite can go, encouraging us to consider the possibility of holding this festival every yearThere were various types of kites flying in the sky. Here is one of the colorful kite with unique shape and the man handling this kite is a member of Chennai Kite Club.Ever since the beginning of human existence, the obsession with the sky has led to inventions after inventions to help us in our bid to conquer the sky. And it was because of this fascination that our ancestors flew the first kites.   Each movement of a kite while it’s on a flight inspires poetry. Our hearts dive when it plunges and when it soars through the sky and achieves heights we can never hope to achieve owing to our human limitations, our spirit flies with it. A kite embodies human desires and it is no wonder then that it symbolizes freedom, joy, prosperity, fortune, and all things good to us.Kite flying has been an age-old tradition in India but now with the intrusion of technology and social media, sports like kite-flying has started retreating into the shadows. Kite Festivals, held from time to time, in different parts of the country are amongst some of the initiatives to celebrate and revive this fading sport. Kites have been a part of our tradition since ancient times and even today they are flown to celebrate various festivals and sentiments. Culturally, for Indians, Kites represent everything that is good – happiness, prosperity, freedom, and peace.Makar Sankranti, the festival that celebrates the movement of the sun into the Northern Hemisphere, is all about flying kites. On this day, especially in Gujarat and Rajasthan, families flock on terraces and indulge in kite flying and fighting from sunrise to sunset and even beyond that. Basant Panchami is another festival on which kite-flying is common.  In Delhi, kites are flown on the Independence Day to celebrate freedom. Tricolors are the most popular kites to be flown on this day. According to Bhai Mian, the man who can rightfully be termed as one of the Godfathers’ of the art of Kite making and flying in Delhi, kites are still flown daily in Old Delhi. He also rubbishes all claims that the tradition is fading. According to him, children are as enthusiastic about kites as they used to be during his youth.Kite Flying is a popular sport in the whole of Asia. In Afghanistan , kite flying suffered till some years back when it was banned. However, now the sport is slowly reviving. In Pakistan, it often transforms into Kite Fighting and is especially popular during the spring. China, often thought to be the birthplace of kite flying, also houses Weifang, the kite flying capital of the world. China also boasts of the largest kite museum in the world.  The photograph above shows one of the kite flying expert from Indonesia.In Europe, Kite Flying is a part of the culture in Greek and Cyprus. Kites of the British Overseas Territory of Bermuda hold world records for altitude and duration. In some countries of South America, the traditions are surprisingly close to those in India. Kites are flown on Independence Day in Chile.  In Guyana, they’re flown around EasterAll over the world, kite festivals welcome international participation. Several of these festivals have been around for some years while new ones are cropping up every year. It seems the entire world is awakening to the charm of kites now.Common belief is that kites were introduced in India by a couple of Chinese Travellers. However, that is where the similarity between Indian and Chinese kites ends. Modern Indian fighter kites are completely different from elaborate Chinese versions. And lately, Chinese kites and strings have started making their appearance in Indian Markets though Bhai Mian maintains that Indian kites are better than their Chinese counterparts in maneuverability and agilitMany believe that kite flying dates back to the time of Mahabharat when they were used to pass messages from one kingdom to another.  However, the earliest evidence of Kite Flying in India is in form of miniature paintings from the Mughal Period dating back to the 1500s. There are many references of lovers delivering romantic messages to each other using kites.   Gradually kite-flying and kite-fighting evolved into full-fledged sports and kites started being flown to celebrate various occasions such as the onset of spring, the Independence Day, and Uttarayan.  And now, history is again being rewritten by dedicated festivals being organized to celebrate kites and all that they stand for. Kite festivals are celebrated all across India with great enthusiasm. The festival in Rajasthan is called the Desert Kite Festival. And along with the main festival in Jodhpur, several parallel celebrations are organized in other cities of the state. Kites also unleashed their magic towards the south. This year, in Hyderabad, the Great Hyderabad Adventure Club organized a Kite Flying festival on the 15th of January. And in Kerala, the second Kerala Kite Festival was organized on January 22nd and 23rd. All of these festivals were received with palpable excitement by the flyers. However, the biggest Kite Festival in India is perhaps the one that is organized on Makar Sankranti in Ahmedabad, Gujarat. This festival has been held every year with increasing fanfare since 1989. The numbers, sizes, shapes, and varieties of kites flown during this festival are outrageous and kite flyers from across the globe attend this festival and showcase their kites and their kite flying skills for the benefit of the others. With so many kites in the sky, it is a wonder how these kites, especially the huge, intricate ones manage to survive. Some facts about Kite Flying :)1.    The Chinese believe that when we look up at a kite in the sky, our mouth opens a bit. This helps in getting rid of the excess heat in the body and, thus, maintaining a healthy Yin-Yang Balance.2.    Japan banned kite-flying in 1760 because it was distracting too many people from their work.3.    East Germany banned large kites because it was thought that they could potentially be used to lift someone across the Berlin Wall4.    In 1855, the Russians towed torpedoes with great accuracy using kites.5.    Kite-flying is growing faster than most other sports in the world6.    Kites have been used for various purposes throughout the world. The uses include fishing, war propaganda, lifting material to workmen working on structures of great heights, lifting observers in wars, and so on.Overall it was great experience to see lot of colorful kites in the sky and looking for next year's Kite Festival in Delhi !!!

However, the biggest Kite Festival in India is perhaps the one that is organized on Makar Sankranti in Ahmedabad, Gujarat. This festival has been held every year with increasing fanfare since 1989. The numbers, sizes, shapes, and varieties of kites flown during this festival are outrageous and kite flyers from across the globe attend this festival and showcase their kites and their kite flying skills for the benefit of the others. With so many kites in the sky, it is a wonder how these kites, especially the huge, intricate ones manage to survive. 

Every year Delhi Tourism Department organizes this wonderful festival for Kite Flying lovers and especially for kids of the country. Delhi has a long history of flying kites and all of us have some fond memories related to flying kites in our childhood. As time passes and one becomes busy with the mundane activities of everyday life, these memories are pushed behind to the back of our minds. The Kite Festival organized by Delhi Tourism brings back some of those memories. Let's check out this PHOTO JOURNEY to know more about Delhi Kite Festival.Here is how Delhi Chief Minister of Delhi expresses her viewpoint about Delhi International Kite Flying Festival -'Kite Flying has been an integral part of the culture of India and the rave response to the first Kite Flying Festival held in Delhi organized by Delhi Tourism is a proof that even in this age of Internet Technology and Social Media, kites have the ability of drag us out of our homes and go back to our childhoods for a bit. Owing to the obvious enthusiasm Delhi harbors for kites, we’ll make this an annual event and celebrate the revival of this erstwhile fading tradition year after year. I congratulate Delhi Tourism for organizing the Kite Flying Festival in Delhi and for bringing out this vibrant souvenir, which is the perfect way to commemorate the event. And I would also like to thank the people of Delhi for making it a huge success.A photograph of 3D Kite flying in the sky around India Gate in DelhiFor the first time in November 2011, the skies over India Gate in Delhi were painted in rainbow colours and decorated with myriad shapes. Kites in all shapes and sizes took over the sky and brought the city to life. The first ever Kite-Flying Festival in Delhi had opened to an overwhelming response by participants and spectators.A passionate Kite flyer from Great Britain who seemed one of the most energetic Kite-flyer on the ground. Most of the kite flyers had some assisting people with them, but he was handling multiple kites on his own. People of all ages, families, couples, and children gathered around in the lush grounds near India Gate and witnessed the unfolding of this event with awe.  It was as if Delhi had been waiting for such an event for ages.  None of the events lacked participation. From kite flying to kite fighting to other cultural events, all were teeming with participants and spectators.  The atmosphere was charged up and spirits as high as a kite can go, encouraging us to consider the possibility of holding this festival every yearThere were various types of kites flying in the sky. Here is one of the colorful kite with unique shape and the man handling this kite is a member of Chennai Kite Club.Ever since the beginning of human existence, the obsession with the sky has led to inventions after inventions to help us in our bid to conquer the sky. And it was because of this fascination that our ancestors flew the first kites.   Each movement of a kite while it’s on a flight inspires poetry. Our hearts dive when it plunges and when it soars through the sky and achieves heights we can never hope to achieve owing to our human limitations, our spirit flies with it. A kite embodies human desires and it is no wonder then that it symbolizes freedom, joy, prosperity, fortune, and all things good to us.Kite flying has been an age-old tradition in India but now with the intrusion of technology and social media, sports like kite-flying has started retreating into the shadows. Kite Festivals, held from time to time, in different parts of the country are amongst some of the initiatives to celebrate and revive this fading sport. Kites have been a part of our tradition since ancient times and even today they are flown to celebrate various festivals and sentiments. Culturally, for Indians, Kites represent everything that is good – happiness, prosperity, freedom, and peace.Makar Sankranti, the festival that celebrates the movement of the sun into the Northern Hemisphere, is all about flying kites. On this day, especially in Gujarat and Rajasthan, families flock on terraces and indulge in kite flying and fighting from sunrise to sunset and even beyond that. Basant Panchami is another festival on which kite-flying is common.  In Delhi, kites are flown on the Independence Day to celebrate freedom. Tricolors are the most popular kites to be flown on this day. According to Bhai Mian, the man who can rightfully be termed as one of the Godfathers’ of the art of Kite making and flying in Delhi, kites are still flown daily in Old Delhi. He also rubbishes all claims that the tradition is fading. According to him, children are as enthusiastic about kites as they used to be during his youth.Kite Flying is a popular sport in the whole of Asia. In Afghanistan , kite flying suffered till some years back when it was banned. However, now the sport is slowly reviving. In Pakistan, it often transforms into Kite Fighting and is especially popular during the spring. China, often thought to be the birthplace of kite flying, also houses Weifang, the kite flying capital of the world. China also boasts of the largest kite museum in the world.  The photograph above shows one of the kite flying expert from Indonesia.In Europe, Kite Flying is a part of the culture in Greek and Cyprus. Kites of the British Overseas Territory of Bermuda hold world records for altitude and duration. In some countries of South America, the traditions are surprisingly close to those in India. Kites are flown on Independence Day in Chile.  In Guyana, they’re flown around EasterAll over the world, kite festivals welcome international participation. Several of these festivals have been around for some years while new ones are cropping up every year. It seems the entire world is awakening to the charm of kites now.Common belief is that kites were introduced in India by a couple of Chinese Travellers. However, that is where the similarity between Indian and Chinese kites ends. Modern Indian fighter kites are completely different from elaborate Chinese versions. And lately, Chinese kites and strings have started making their appearance in Indian Markets though Bhai Mian maintains that Indian kites are better than their Chinese counterparts in maneuverability and agilitMany believe that kite flying dates back to the time of Mahabharat when they were used to pass messages from one kingdom to another.  However, the earliest evidence of Kite Flying in India is in form of miniature paintings from the Mughal Period dating back to the 1500s. There are many references of lovers delivering romantic messages to each other using kites.   Gradually kite-flying and kite-fighting evolved into full-fledged sports and kites started being flown to celebrate various occasions such as the onset of spring, the Independence Day, and Uttarayan.  And now, history is again being rewritten by dedicated festivals being organized to celebrate kites and all that they stand for. Kite festivals are celebrated all across India with great enthusiasm. The festival in Rajasthan is called the Desert Kite Festival. And along with the main festival in Jodhpur, several parallel celebrations are organized in other cities of the state. Kites also unleashed their magic towards the south. This year, in Hyderabad, the Great Hyderabad Adventure Club organized a Kite Flying festival on the 15th of January. And in Kerala, the second Kerala Kite Festival was organized on January 22nd and 23rd. All of these festivals were received with palpable excitement by the flyers. However, the biggest Kite Festival in India is perhaps the one that is organized on Makar Sankranti in Ahmedabad, Gujarat. This festival has been held every year with increasing fanfare since 1989. The numbers, sizes, shapes, and varieties of kites flown during this festival are outrageous and kite flyers from across the globe attend this festival and showcase their kites and their kite flying skills for the benefit of the others. With so many kites in the sky, it is a wonder how these kites, especially the huge, intricate ones manage to survive. Some facts about Kite Flying :)1.    The Chinese believe that when we look up at a kite in the sky, our mouth opens a bit. This helps in getting rid of the excess heat in the body and, thus, maintaining a healthy Yin-Yang Balance.2.    Japan banned kite-flying in 1760 because it was distracting too many people from their work.3.    East Germany banned large kites because it was thought that they could potentially be used to lift someone across the Berlin Wall4.    In 1855, the Russians towed torpedoes with great accuracy using kites.5.    Kite-flying is growing faster than most other sports in the world6.    Kites have been used for various purposes throughout the world. The uses include fishing, war propaganda, lifting material to workmen working on structures of great heights, lifting observers in wars, and so on.Overall it was great experience to see lot of colorful kites in the sky and looking for next year's Kite Festival in Delhi !!!

Some facts about Kite Flying :)

1.    The Chinese believe that when we look up at a kite in the sky, our mouth opens a bit. This helps in getting rid of the excess heat in the body and, thus, maintaining a healthy Yin-Yang Balance.

2.    Japan banned kite-flying in 1760 because it was distracting too many people from their work.

3.    East Germany banned large kites because it was thought that they could potentially be used to lift someone across the Berlin Wall

4.    In 1855, the Russians towed torpedoes with great accuracy using kites.

5.    Kite-flying is growing faster than most other sports in the world.

6.    Kites have been used for various purposes throughout the world. The uses include fishing, war propaganda, lifting material to workmen working on structures of great heights, lifting observers in wars, and so on.
 
Every year Delhi Tourism Department organizes this wonderful festival for Kite Flying lovers and especially for kids of the country. Delhi has a long history of flying kites and all of us have some fond memories related to flying kites in our childhood. As time passes and one becomes busy with the mundane activities of everyday life, these memories are pushed behind to the back of our minds. The Kite Festival organized by Delhi Tourism brings back some of those memories. Let's check out this PHOTO JOURNEY to know more about Delhi Kite Festival.Here is how Delhi Chief Minister of Delhi expresses her viewpoint about Delhi International Kite Flying Festival -'Kite Flying has been an integral part of the culture of India and the rave response to the first Kite Flying Festival held in Delhi organized by Delhi Tourism is a proof that even in this age of Internet Technology and Social Media, kites have the ability of drag us out of our homes and go back to our childhoods for a bit. Owing to the obvious enthusiasm Delhi harbors for kites, we’ll make this an annual event and celebrate the revival of this erstwhile fading tradition year after year. I congratulate Delhi Tourism for organizing the Kite Flying Festival in Delhi and for bringing out this vibrant souvenir, which is the perfect way to commemorate the event. And I would also like to thank the people of Delhi for making it a huge success.A photograph of 3D Kite flying in the sky around India Gate in DelhiFor the first time in November 2011, the skies over India Gate in Delhi were painted in rainbow colours and decorated with myriad shapes. Kites in all shapes and sizes took over the sky and brought the city to life. The first ever Kite-Flying Festival in Delhi had opened to an overwhelming response by participants and spectators.A passionate Kite flyer from Great Britain who seemed one of the most energetic Kite-flyer on the ground. Most of the kite flyers had some assisting people with them, but he was handling multiple kites on his own. People of all ages, families, couples, and children gathered around in the lush grounds near India Gate and witnessed the unfolding of this event with awe.  It was as if Delhi had been waiting for such an event for ages.  None of the events lacked participation. From kite flying to kite fighting to other cultural events, all were teeming with participants and spectators.  The atmosphere was charged up and spirits as high as a kite can go, encouraging us to consider the possibility of holding this festival every yearThere were various types of kites flying in the sky. Here is one of the colorful kite with unique shape and the man handling this kite is a member of Chennai Kite Club.Ever since the beginning of human existence, the obsession with the sky has led to inventions after inventions to help us in our bid to conquer the sky. And it was because of this fascination that our ancestors flew the first kites.   Each movement of a kite while it’s on a flight inspires poetry. Our hearts dive when it plunges and when it soars through the sky and achieves heights we can never hope to achieve owing to our human limitations, our spirit flies with it. A kite embodies human desires and it is no wonder then that it symbolizes freedom, joy, prosperity, fortune, and all things good to us.Kite flying has been an age-old tradition in India but now with the intrusion of technology and social media, sports like kite-flying has started retreating into the shadows. Kite Festivals, held from time to time, in different parts of the country are amongst some of the initiatives to celebrate and revive this fading sport. Kites have been a part of our tradition since ancient times and even today they are flown to celebrate various festivals and sentiments. Culturally, for Indians, Kites represent everything that is good – happiness, prosperity, freedom, and peace.Makar Sankranti, the festival that celebrates the movement of the sun into the Northern Hemisphere, is all about flying kites. On this day, especially in Gujarat and Rajasthan, families flock on terraces and indulge in kite flying and fighting from sunrise to sunset and even beyond that. Basant Panchami is another festival on which kite-flying is common.  In Delhi, kites are flown on the Independence Day to celebrate freedom. Tricolors are the most popular kites to be flown on this day. According to Bhai Mian, the man who can rightfully be termed as one of the Godfathers’ of the art of Kite making and flying in Delhi, kites are still flown daily in Old Delhi. He also rubbishes all claims that the tradition is fading. According to him, children are as enthusiastic about kites as they used to be during his youth.Kite Flying is a popular sport in the whole of Asia. In Afghanistan , kite flying suffered till some years back when it was banned. However, now the sport is slowly reviving. In Pakistan, it often transforms into Kite Fighting and is especially popular during the spring. China, often thought to be the birthplace of kite flying, also houses Weifang, the kite flying capital of the world. China also boasts of the largest kite museum in the world.  The photograph above shows one of the kite flying expert from Indonesia.In Europe, Kite Flying is a part of the culture in Greek and Cyprus. Kites of the British Overseas Territory of Bermuda hold world records for altitude and duration. In some countries of South America, the traditions are surprisingly close to those in India. Kites are flown on Independence Day in Chile.  In Guyana, they’re flown around EasterAll over the world, kite festivals welcome international participation. Several of these festivals have been around for some years while new ones are cropping up every year. It seems the entire world is awakening to the charm of kites now.Common belief is that kites were introduced in India by a couple of Chinese Travellers. However, that is where the similarity between Indian and Chinese kites ends. Modern Indian fighter kites are completely different from elaborate Chinese versions. And lately, Chinese kites and strings have started making their appearance in Indian Markets though Bhai Mian maintains that Indian kites are better than their Chinese counterparts in maneuverability and agilitMany believe that kite flying dates back to the time of Mahabharat when they were used to pass messages from one kingdom to another.  However, the earliest evidence of Kite Flying in India is in form of miniature paintings from the Mughal Period dating back to the 1500s. There are many references of lovers delivering romantic messages to each other using kites.   Gradually kite-flying and kite-fighting evolved into full-fledged sports and kites started being flown to celebrate various occasions such as the onset of spring, the Independence Day, and Uttarayan.  And now, history is again being rewritten by dedicated festivals being organized to celebrate kites and all that they stand for. Kite festivals are celebrated all across India with great enthusiasm. The festival in Rajasthan is called the Desert Kite Festival. And along with the main festival in Jodhpur, several parallel celebrations are organized in other cities of the state. Kites also unleashed their magic towards the south. This year, in Hyderabad, the Great Hyderabad Adventure Club organized a Kite Flying festival on the 15th of January. And in Kerala, the second Kerala Kite Festival was organized on January 22nd and 23rd. All of these festivals were received with palpable excitement by the flyers. However, the biggest Kite Festival in India is perhaps the one that is organized on Makar Sankranti in Ahmedabad, Gujarat. This festival has been held every year with increasing fanfare since 1989. The numbers, sizes, shapes, and varieties of kites flown during this festival are outrageous and kite flyers from across the globe attend this festival and showcase their kites and their kite flying skills for the benefit of the others. With so many kites in the sky, it is a wonder how these kites, especially the huge, intricate ones manage to survive. Some facts about Kite Flying :)1.    The Chinese believe that when we look up at a kite in the sky, our mouth opens a bit. This helps in getting rid of the excess heat in the body and, thus, maintaining a healthy Yin-Yang Balance.2.    Japan banned kite-flying in 1760 because it was distracting too many people from their work.3.    East Germany banned large kites because it was thought that they could potentially be used to lift someone across the Berlin Wall4.    In 1855, the Russians towed torpedoes with great accuracy using kites.5.    Kite-flying is growing faster than most other sports in the world6.    Kites have been used for various purposes throughout the world. The uses include fishing, war propaganda, lifting material to workmen working on structures of great heights, lifting observers in wars, and so on.Overall it was great experience to see lot of colorful kites in the sky and looking for next year's Kite Festival in Delhi !!!

Overall it was great experience to see lot of colorful kites in the sky and looking for next year's Kite Festival in Delhi !!!

Every year Delhi Tourism Department organizes this wonderful festival for Kite Flying lovers and especially for kids of the country. Delhi has a long history of flying kites and all of us have some fond memories related to flying kites in our childhood. As time passes and one becomes busy with the mundane activities of everyday life, these memories are pushed behind to the back of our minds. The Kite Festival organized by Delhi Tourism brings back some of those memories. Let's check out this PHOTO JOURNEY to know more about Delhi Kite Festival.Here is how Delhi Chief Minister of Delhi expresses her viewpoint about Delhi International Kite Flying Festival -'Kite Flying has been an integral part of the culture of India and the rave response to the first Kite Flying Festival held in Delhi organized by Delhi Tourism is a proof that even in this age of Internet Technology and Social Media, kites have the ability of drag us out of our homes and go back to our childhoods for a bit. Owing to the obvious enthusiasm Delhi harbors for kites, we’ll make this an annual event and celebrate the revival of this erstwhile fading tradition year after year. I congratulate Delhi Tourism for organizing the Kite Flying Festival in Delhi and for bringing out this vibrant souvenir, which is the perfect way to commemorate the event. And I would also like to thank the people of Delhi for making it a huge success.A photograph of 3D Kite flying in the sky around India Gate in DelhiFor the first time in November 2011, the skies over India Gate in Delhi were painted in rainbow colours and decorated with myriad shapes. Kites in all shapes and sizes took over the sky and brought the city to life. The first ever Kite-Flying Festival in Delhi had opened to an overwhelming response by participants and spectators.A passionate Kite flyer from Great Britain who seemed one of the most energetic Kite-flyer on the ground. Most of the kite flyers had some assisting people with them, but he was handling multiple kites on his own. People of all ages, families, couples, and children gathered around in the lush grounds near India Gate and witnessed the unfolding of this event with awe.  It was as if Delhi had been waiting for such an event for ages.  None of the events lacked participation. From kite flying to kite fighting to other cultural events, all were teeming with participants and spectators.  The atmosphere was charged up and spirits as high as a kite can go, encouraging us to consider the possibility of holding this festival every yearThere were various types of kites flying in the sky. Here is one of the colorful kite with unique shape and the man handling this kite is a member of Chennai Kite Club.Ever since the beginning of human existence, the obsession with the sky has led to inventions after inventions to help us in our bid to conquer the sky. And it was because of this fascination that our ancestors flew the first kites.   Each movement of a kite while it’s on a flight inspires poetry. Our hearts dive when it plunges and when it soars through the sky and achieves heights we can never hope to achieve owing to our human limitations, our spirit flies with it. A kite embodies human desires and it is no wonder then that it symbolizes freedom, joy, prosperity, fortune, and all things good to us.Kite flying has been an age-old tradition in India but now with the intrusion of technology and social media, sports like kite-flying has started retreating into the shadows. Kite Festivals, held from time to time, in different parts of the country are amongst some of the initiatives to celebrate and revive this fading sport. Kites have been a part of our tradition since ancient times and even today they are flown to celebrate various festivals and sentiments. Culturally, for Indians, Kites represent everything that is good – happiness, prosperity, freedom, and peace.Makar Sankranti, the festival that celebrates the movement of the sun into the Northern Hemisphere, is all about flying kites. On this day, especially in Gujarat and Rajasthan, families flock on terraces and indulge in kite flying and fighting from sunrise to sunset and even beyond that. Basant Panchami is another festival on which kite-flying is common.  In Delhi, kites are flown on the Independence Day to celebrate freedom. Tricolors are the most popular kites to be flown on this day. According to Bhai Mian, the man who can rightfully be termed as one of the Godfathers’ of the art of Kite making and flying in Delhi, kites are still flown daily in Old Delhi. He also rubbishes all claims that the tradition is fading. According to him, children are as enthusiastic about kites as they used to be during his youth.Kite Flying is a popular sport in the whole of Asia. In Afghanistan , kite flying suffered till some years back when it was banned. However, now the sport is slowly reviving. In Pakistan, it often transforms into Kite Fighting and is especially popular during the spring. China, often thought to be the birthplace of kite flying, also houses Weifang, the kite flying capital of the world. China also boasts of the largest kite museum in the world.  The photograph above shows one of the kite flying expert from Indonesia.In Europe, Kite Flying is a part of the culture in Greek and Cyprus. Kites of the British Overseas Territory of Bermuda hold world records for altitude and duration. In some countries of South America, the traditions are surprisingly close to those in India. Kites are flown on Independence Day in Chile.  In Guyana, they’re flown around EasterAll over the world, kite festivals welcome international participation. Several of these festivals have been around for some years while new ones are cropping up every year. It seems the entire world is awakening to the charm of kites now.Common belief is that kites were introduced in India by a couple of Chinese Travellers. However, that is where the similarity between Indian and Chinese kites ends. Modern Indian fighter kites are completely different from elaborate Chinese versions. And lately, Chinese kites and strings have started making their appearance in Indian Markets though Bhai Mian maintains that Indian kites are better than their Chinese counterparts in maneuverability and agilitMany believe that kite flying dates back to the time of Mahabharat when they were used to pass messages from one kingdom to another.  However, the earliest evidence of Kite Flying in India is in form of miniature paintings from the Mughal Period dating back to the 1500s. There are many references of lovers delivering romantic messages to each other using kites.   Gradually kite-flying and kite-fighting evolved into full-fledged sports and kites started being flown to celebrate various occasions such as the onset of spring, the Independence Day, and Uttarayan.  And now, history is again being rewritten by dedicated festivals being organized to celebrate kites and all that they stand for. Kite festivals are celebrated all across India with great enthusiasm. The festival in Rajasthan is called the Desert Kite Festival. And along with the main festival in Jodhpur, several parallel celebrations are organized in other cities of the state. Kites also unleashed their magic towards the south. This year, in Hyderabad, the Great Hyderabad Adventure Club organized a Kite Flying festival on the 15th of January. And in Kerala, the second Kerala Kite Festival was organized on January 22nd and 23rd. All of these festivals were received with palpable excitement by the flyers. However, the biggest Kite Festival in India is perhaps the one that is organized on Makar Sankranti in Ahmedabad, Gujarat. This festival has been held every year with increasing fanfare since 1989. The numbers, sizes, shapes, and varieties of kites flown during this festival are outrageous and kite flyers from across the globe attend this festival and showcase their kites and their kite flying skills for the benefit of the others. With so many kites in the sky, it is a wonder how these kites, especially the huge, intricate ones manage to survive. Some facts about Kite Flying :)1.    The Chinese believe that when we look up at a kite in the sky, our mouth opens a bit. This helps in getting rid of the excess heat in the body and, thus, maintaining a healthy Yin-Yang Balance.2.    Japan banned kite-flying in 1760 because it was distracting too many people from their work.3.    East Germany banned large kites because it was thought that they could potentially be used to lift someone across the Berlin Wall4.    In 1855, the Russians towed torpedoes with great accuracy using kites.5.    Kite-flying is growing faster than most other sports in the world6.    Kites have been used for various purposes throughout the world. The uses include fishing, war propaganda, lifting material to workmen working on structures of great heights, lifting observers in wars, and so on.Overall it was great experience to see lot of colorful kites in the sky and looking for next year's Kite Festival in Delhi !!!

14 comments:

Defiant Princess said...

love the pictures! some really beautiful kites you clicked :)

http://khanvibes.blogspot.com/

sangeeta said...

Great post!!
Nice to know so much about kite flying.

VJ Sharma said...

Thanks Sangeeta !

Happy that you liked this. Long time back, I met the Indian King in Kite Flying - Bhai Mian. If intersted, you can more details about him and other stuff about Kite Flying in India - http://phototravelings.blogspot.com/2011/12/bhai-mian-kite-flying-superhero-from.html

Smita Dhall said...

Lovely pictures!!!!! Super duper top class post!

VJ Sharma said...

Thanks Smita :)

For me, it was worth to find time and go there... Also got a chance to meet Bhai Mian again, who is considered as Kite-Flying King of the country !

GvSparx said...

Amazing colorful pictures. I loved that huge vishnu kite in particular.

Sangita Passey said...

Thanks for sharing the pics... we could watch the festival through your amazing pics!!
(Were feeling somewhat sad as we could not have seen the festival due to some other family function)

VJ Sharma said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
VJ Sharma said...

Thanks Gv & Sangita Mam !

Gv - Vishnu or Ganesha? :)

sreedhar babu said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Nitin Gupta a.k.a. LP said...

VJ,This is so Aaesome, the 3d Kite looked FAB, thanks for capturing it so well and narrating it.

Nitin Gupta a.k.a. LP said...

VJ, The pictures are really awesome, enjoyed every bit of it.
I was not it Delhi, and missed it, Great narration of the event made me me feel that I was there.

Many Thanks

VJ Sharma said...

Thanks Nitin ! It was really awesome to see 3D kites flying in the sky with ease...

Anonymous said...

the garuda kite belongs to team mangalore and the man there in is the member of team mangalore ...and it is not a kite of chennai kite club

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