Quick Shikara Ride in Kashmir's famous Lake 'Dal Jheel' during Mughal Rally 2012

Dal Lake is one of the most popular lakes of India, which is located in Srinagar, the summer capital of Jammu and Kashmir. The urban lake, which is the second largest in the state, is integral to tourism and recreation in Kashmir and is nicknamed the 'Jewel in the crown of Kashmir' or 'Srinagar's Jewel'. The lake is also an important source for commercial operations in fishing and water plant harvesting.The shore line of the lake is encompassed by a boulevard lined with Mughal era gardens, parks, houseboats and hotels. Scenic views of the lake can be witnessed from the shore line Mughal gardens, such as Shalimar Bagh and Nishat Bagh built during the reign of Mughal Emperor Jahangir) and from houseboats cruising along the lake in the colourful shikaras. Dal Lake has some Floating gardens as well. The floating gardens, known as 'Rad' in Kashmiri, blossom with lotus flowers during July and August. The wetland is divided by causeways into four basins - Gagribal, Lokut Dal, Bod Dal and Nagin (although Nagin is also considered as an independent lake). During our trip to Shrinagar, we stayed in a hotel around Nagin lake only. Oldest Five star of the city is located on the bank of Nagin Lake. Lokut-dal and Bod-dal each have an island in the centre, known as Rup Lank (or Char Chinari) and Sona Lank respectively.  There are some personal houses around Dal Lake and people have their own boats to travel from one place to another for getting stuff from Lake-Market, which is again located inside Dal Lake only. Houseboats and the Dal Lake are widely associated with Srinigar and are nicknamed 'floating palaces', built according to British customs.The houseboats are generally made from local cedar-wood and are graded in a similar fashion to hotels according to level of comfort.Many of them have lavishly furnished rooms, with verandas and a terrace to serve as a sun-deck or to serve evening cocktails.They are mainly moored along the western periphery of the lake, close to the lakeside boulevard in the vicinity of the Dal gate and on small islands in the lake. They are anchored individually, with interconnecting bridges providing access from one boat to the other.The kitchen-boat is annexed to the main houseboat, which also serves as residence of the boatkeeper and his family.Many boats on Dal Lake are used for selling stuff to tourists. Anything like Artificial Jewellery, Corns, Fruits, Cloths, Wooden Articles, Flowers etc. Some of the vendors can be seen selling digital-cards for still/video cameras.        Each houseboat has an exclusive shikara for ferrying guests to the shore. A shikara is small paddled taxi boat, often about 15 feet and made of wood with a canopy and a spade shaped bottom.It is the cultural symbol of Kashmir and is used not only for ferrying visitors but is also used for the vending of fruits, vegetables and flowers and for the fishing and harvesting of aquatic vegetation.All gardens in the lake periphery and houseboats anchored in the lake are approachable through shikaras.The boats are often navigated by two boatmen dressed in 'Phiron' (traditional dress) and carry 'Kangris' or portable heaters on the boat.A shikara can seat about six people and have heavily cushioned seats and backrests to provide comfort in Mughul style.All houseboat owners provide shikara transport to their house guests free of charge. The shikara is also used to provide for other sightseeing locations in the valley, notably a cruise along the Jhelum River, offering scenic views of the Pir Panjal mountains and passing through the famous seven bridges and the backwaters enroute.

Last month I was in Shrinagar for covering 3rd Mughal Rally which was organized by Himalayan Motrosports along with J&K Bank and J&K Tourism department. In 2012, it was 3rd Mughal Rally which is a two days event for Motorsport Enthusiasts. We were there at Shrinagar for three days, so managed to find time during one of the days to go for Shikara Ride in Dal Lake. This Photo Journey shares some of the phoptographs from this Shikara Ride in Dal Lake.


Dal Lake is one of the most popular lakes of India, which is located in Srinagar, the summer capital of Jammu and Kashmir. The urban lake, which is the second largest in the state, is integral to tourism and recreation in Kashmir and is nicknamed the 'Jewel in the crown of Kashmir' or 'Srinagar's Jewel'. The lake is also an important source for commercial operations in fishing and water plant harvesting.The shore line of the lake is encompassed by a boulevard lined with Mughal era gardens, parks, houseboats and hotels. Scenic views of the lake can be witnessed from the shore line Mughal gardens, such as Shalimar Bagh and Nishat Bagh built during the reign of Mughal Emperor Jahangir) and from houseboats cruising along the lake in the colourful shikaras. Dal Lake has some Floating gardens as well. The floating gardens, known as 'Rad' in Kashmiri, blossom with lotus flowers during July and August. The wetland is divided by causeways into four basins - Gagribal, Lokut Dal, Bod Dal and Nagin (although Nagin is also considered as an independent lake). During our trip to Shrinagar, we stayed in a hotel around Nagin lake only. Oldest Five star of the city is located on the bank of Nagin Lake. Lokut-dal and Bod-dal each have an island in the centre, known as Rup Lank (or Char Chinari) and Sona Lank respectively.  There are some personal houses around Dal Lake and people have their own boats to travel from one place to another for getting stuff from Lake-Market, which is again located inside Dal Lake only. Houseboats and the Dal Lake are widely associated with Srinigar and are nicknamed 'floating palaces', built according to British customs.The houseboats are generally made from local cedar-wood and are graded in a similar fashion to hotels according to level of comfort.Many of them have lavishly furnished rooms, with verandas and a terrace to serve as a sun-deck or to serve evening cocktails.They are mainly moored along the western periphery of the lake, close to the lakeside boulevard in the vicinity of the Dal gate and on small islands in the lake. They are anchored individually, with interconnecting bridges providing access from one boat to the other.The kitchen-boat is annexed to the main houseboat, which also serves as residence of the boatkeeper and his family.Many boats on Dal Lake are used for selling stuff to tourists. Anything like Artificial Jewellery, Corns, Fruits, Cloths, Wooden Articles, Flowers etc. Some of the vendors can be seen selling digital-cards for still/video cameras.        Each houseboat has an exclusive shikara for ferrying guests to the shore. A shikara is small paddled taxi boat, often about 15 feet and made of wood with a canopy and a spade shaped bottom.It is the cultural symbol of Kashmir and is used not only for ferrying visitors but is also used for the vending of fruits, vegetables and flowers and for the fishing and harvesting of aquatic vegetation.All gardens in the lake periphery and houseboats anchored in the lake are approachable through shikaras.The boats are often navigated by two boatmen dressed in 'Phiron' (traditional dress) and carry 'Kangris' or portable heaters on the boat.A shikara can seat about six people and have heavily cushioned seats and backrests to provide comfort in Mughul style.All houseboat owners provide shikara transport to their house guests free of charge. The shikara is also used to provide for other sightseeing locations in the valley, notably a cruise along the Jhelum River, offering scenic views of the Pir Panjal mountains and passing through the famous seven bridges and the backwaters enroute.

Above photograph shows Market inside the Dal Lake. It was wonderful moment to ride in a boat through Market built inside the Lake. There were many houses around the lake and almost every house owns a boat to commute from one place to another within Lake. FOlks were coming to this market in their own boats. Imagine a personal boat instead of personal car with a thought of commuting in that boat to all importantb places like Markets. Schools, Offices etc.

Dal Lake is one of the most popular lakes of India, which is located in Srinagar, the summer capital of Jammu and Kashmir. The urban lake, which is the second largest in the state, is integral to tourism and recreation in Kashmir and is nicknamed the 'Jewel in the crown of Kashmir' or 'Srinagar's Jewel'. The lake is also an important source for commercial operations in fishing and water plant harvesting.The shore line of the lake is encompassed by a boulevard lined with Mughal era gardens, parks, houseboats and hotels. Scenic views of the lake can be witnessed from the shore line Mughal gardens, such as Shalimar Bagh and Nishat Bagh built during the reign of Mughal Emperor Jahangir) and from houseboats cruising along the lake in the colourful shikaras. Dal Lake has some Floating gardens as well. The floating gardens, known as 'Rad' in Kashmiri, blossom with lotus flowers during July and August. The wetland is divided by causeways into four basins - Gagribal, Lokut Dal, Bod Dal and Nagin (although Nagin is also considered as an independent lake). During our trip to Shrinagar, we stayed in a hotel around Nagin lake only. Oldest Five star of the city is located on the bank of Nagin Lake. Lokut-dal and Bod-dal each have an island in the centre, known as Rup Lank (or Char Chinari) and Sona Lank respectively.  There are some personal houses around Dal Lake and people have their own boats to travel from one place to another for getting stuff from Lake-Market, which is again located inside Dal Lake only. Houseboats and the Dal Lake are widely associated with Srinigar and are nicknamed 'floating palaces', built according to British customs.The houseboats are generally made from local cedar-wood and are graded in a similar fashion to hotels according to level of comfort.Many of them have lavishly furnished rooms, with verandas and a terrace to serve as a sun-deck or to serve evening cocktails.They are mainly moored along the western periphery of the lake, close to the lakeside boulevard in the vicinity of the Dal gate and on small islands in the lake. They are anchored individually, with interconnecting bridges providing access from one boat to the other.The kitchen-boat is annexed to the main houseboat, which also serves as residence of the boatkeeper and his family.Many boats on Dal Lake are used for selling stuff to tourists. Anything like Artificial Jewellery, Corns, Fruits, Cloths, Wooden Articles, Flowers etc. Some of the vendors can be seen selling digital-cards for still/video cameras.        Each houseboat has an exclusive shikara for ferrying guests to the shore. A shikara is small paddled taxi boat, often about 15 feet and made of wood with a canopy and a spade shaped bottom.It is the cultural symbol of Kashmir and is used not only for ferrying visitors but is also used for the vending of fruits, vegetables and flowers and for the fishing and harvesting of aquatic vegetation.All gardens in the lake periphery and houseboats anchored in the lake are approachable through shikaras.The boats are often navigated by two boatmen dressed in 'Phiron' (traditional dress) and carry 'Kangris' or portable heaters on the boat.A shikara can seat about six people and have heavily cushioned seats and backrests to provide comfort in Mughul style.All houseboat owners provide shikara transport to their house guests free of charge. The shikara is also used to provide for other sightseeing locations in the valley, notably a cruise along the Jhelum River, offering scenic views of the Pir Panjal mountains and passing through the famous seven bridges and the backwaters enroute.

It was morning time around 9:30 am when we started from our Hotel (Centaur). Varun, Sandeep and Sukant were accopnying for the ride and two of them were also looking forward to get good shots from this ride. Light was extremely harsh and we were extremely disappointed with our laziness due to which we could not come early in the morning. I was very frustrated but Sandeep and Varun kept motivating me to click and take this as a new challenge. So we tried to capture some of the elements from Dal Lake in Shrinagar. Dal Lake is a wonderful place to shoot but timing to go there is extremely important, although this fact is quite important while shooting in hills.

Dal Lake is one of the most popular lakes of India, which is located in Srinagar, the summer capital of Jammu and Kashmir. The urban lake, which is the second largest in the state, is integral to tourism and recreation in Kashmir and is nicknamed the 'Jewel in the crown of Kashmir' or 'Srinagar's Jewel'. The lake is also an important source for commercial operations in fishing and water plant harvesting.The shore line of the lake is encompassed by a boulevard lined with Mughal era gardens, parks, houseboats and hotels. Scenic views of the lake can be witnessed from the shore line Mughal gardens, such as Shalimar Bagh and Nishat Bagh built during the reign of Mughal Emperor Jahangir) and from houseboats cruising along the lake in the colourful shikaras. Dal Lake has some Floating gardens as well. The floating gardens, known as 'Rad' in Kashmiri, blossom with lotus flowers during July and August. The wetland is divided by causeways into four basins - Gagribal, Lokut Dal, Bod Dal and Nagin (although Nagin is also considered as an independent lake). During our trip to Shrinagar, we stayed in a hotel around Nagin lake only. Oldest Five star of the city is located on the bank of Nagin Lake. Lokut-dal and Bod-dal each have an island in the centre, known as Rup Lank (or Char Chinari) and Sona Lank respectively.  There are some personal houses around Dal Lake and people have their own boats to travel from one place to another for getting stuff from Lake-Market, which is again located inside Dal Lake only. Houseboats and the Dal Lake are widely associated with Srinigar and are nicknamed 'floating palaces', built according to British customs.The houseboats are generally made from local cedar-wood and are graded in a similar fashion to hotels according to level of comfort.Many of them have lavishly furnished rooms, with verandas and a terrace to serve as a sun-deck or to serve evening cocktails.They are mainly moored along the western periphery of the lake, close to the lakeside boulevard in the vicinity of the Dal gate and on small islands in the lake. They are anchored individually, with interconnecting bridges providing access from one boat to the other.The kitchen-boat is annexed to the main houseboat, which also serves as residence of the boatkeeper and his family.Many boats on Dal Lake are used for selling stuff to tourists. Anything like Artificial Jewellery, Corns, Fruits, Cloths, Wooden Articles, Flowers etc. Some of the vendors can be seen selling digital-cards for still/video cameras.        Each houseboat has an exclusive shikara for ferrying guests to the shore. A shikara is small paddled taxi boat, often about 15 feet and made of wood with a canopy and a spade shaped bottom.It is the cultural symbol of Kashmir and is used not only for ferrying visitors but is also used for the vending of fruits, vegetables and flowers and for the fishing and harvesting of aquatic vegetation.All gardens in the lake periphery and houseboats anchored in the lake are approachable through shikaras.The boats are often navigated by two boatmen dressed in 'Phiron' (traditional dress) and carry 'Kangris' or portable heaters on the boat.A shikara can seat about six people and have heavily cushioned seats and backrests to provide comfort in Mughul style.All houseboat owners provide shikara transport to their house guests free of charge. The shikara is also used to provide for other sightseeing locations in the valley, notably a cruise along the Jhelum River, offering scenic views of the Pir Panjal mountains and passing through the famous seven bridges and the backwaters enroute.

Our Shikara Ride started from Hotel Centaur which is located on the bank of Nagin Lake. Nagin Lake is connected to Dal Lake, so our Shikara moved towards Dal to show us Market of Old Kashmir. On the way from Nagin to Dal, there were lot of House-Boats on right side with wonderful facilities inside. Even from outside they were looking amrvelous. We could see seating place on terrace and few private baots/Shikaras standing in front of them. This is sort of different experience to stay in these houseboats with unique interiors and architecture. Above photograph shows one of the photographs of House-Boats in Dal Lake, Shrinagar, Jammu & Kashmir !!!

Dal Lake is one of the most popular lakes of India, which is located in Srinagar, the summer capital of Jammu and Kashmir. The urban lake, which is the second largest in the state, is integral to tourism and recreation in Kashmir and is nicknamed the 'Jewel in the crown of Kashmir' or 'Srinagar's Jewel'. The lake is also an important source for commercial operations in fishing and water plant harvesting.The shore line of the lake is encompassed by a boulevard lined with Mughal era gardens, parks, houseboats and hotels. Scenic views of the lake can be witnessed from the shore line Mughal gardens, such as Shalimar Bagh and Nishat Bagh built during the reign of Mughal Emperor Jahangir) and from houseboats cruising along the lake in the colourful shikaras. Dal Lake has some Floating gardens as well. The floating gardens, known as 'Rad' in Kashmiri, blossom with lotus flowers during July and August. The wetland is divided by causeways into four basins - Gagribal, Lokut Dal, Bod Dal and Nagin (although Nagin is also considered as an independent lake). During our trip to Shrinagar, we stayed in a hotel around Nagin lake only. Oldest Five star of the city is located on the bank of Nagin Lake. Lokut-dal and Bod-dal each have an island in the centre, known as Rup Lank (or Char Chinari) and Sona Lank respectively.  There are some personal houses around Dal Lake and people have their own boats to travel from one place to another for getting stuff from Lake-Market, which is again located inside Dal Lake only. Houseboats and the Dal Lake are widely associated with Srinigar and are nicknamed 'floating palaces', built according to British customs.The houseboats are generally made from local cedar-wood and are graded in a similar fashion to hotels according to level of comfort.Many of them have lavishly furnished rooms, with verandas and a terrace to serve as a sun-deck or to serve evening cocktails.They are mainly moored along the western periphery of the lake, close to the lakeside boulevard in the vicinity of the Dal gate and on small islands in the lake. They are anchored individually, with interconnecting bridges providing access from one boat to the other.The kitchen-boat is annexed to the main houseboat, which also serves as residence of the boatkeeper and his family.Many boats on Dal Lake are used for selling stuff to tourists. Anything like Artificial Jewellery, Corns, Fruits, Cloths, Wooden Articles, Flowers etc. Some of the vendors can be seen selling digital-cards for still/video cameras.        Each houseboat has an exclusive shikara for ferrying guests to the shore. A shikara is small paddled taxi boat, often about 15 feet and made of wood with a canopy and a spade shaped bottom.It is the cultural symbol of Kashmir and is used not only for ferrying visitors but is also used for the vending of fruits, vegetables and flowers and for the fishing and harvesting of aquatic vegetation.All gardens in the lake periphery and houseboats anchored in the lake are approachable through shikaras.The boats are often navigated by two boatmen dressed in 'Phiron' (traditional dress) and carry 'Kangris' or portable heaters on the boat.A shikara can seat about six people and have heavily cushioned seats and backrests to provide comfort in Mughul style.All houseboat owners provide shikara transport to their house guests free of charge. The shikara is also used to provide for other sightseeing locations in the valley, notably a cruise along the Jhelum River, offering scenic views of the Pir Panjal mountains and passing through the famous seven bridges and the backwaters enroute.

Lotuses are very special to Dal Lake and they are spear all around in different colors. White ones looked more beautiful to me, so shot above photograph. Various Houses, House-boats and Shops around Dal Lake keep proper care of these Lotuses.

Dal Lake is one of the most popular lakes of India, which is located in Srinagar, the summer capital of Jammu and Kashmir. The urban lake, which is the second largest in the state, is integral to tourism and recreation in Kashmir and is nicknamed the 'Jewel in the crown of Kashmir' or 'Srinagar's Jewel'. The lake is also an important source for commercial operations in fishing and water plant harvesting.The shore line of the lake is encompassed by a boulevard lined with Mughal era gardens, parks, houseboats and hotels. Scenic views of the lake can be witnessed from the shore line Mughal gardens, such as Shalimar Bagh and Nishat Bagh built during the reign of Mughal Emperor Jahangir) and from houseboats cruising along the lake in the colourful shikaras. Dal Lake has some Floating gardens as well. The floating gardens, known as 'Rad' in Kashmiri, blossom with lotus flowers during July and August. The wetland is divided by causeways into four basins - Gagribal, Lokut Dal, Bod Dal and Nagin (although Nagin is also considered as an independent lake). During our trip to Shrinagar, we stayed in a hotel around Nagin lake only. Oldest Five star of the city is located on the bank of Nagin Lake. Lokut-dal and Bod-dal each have an island in the centre, known as Rup Lank (or Char Chinari) and Sona Lank respectively.  There are some personal houses around Dal Lake and people have their own boats to travel from one place to another for getting stuff from Lake-Market, which is again located inside Dal Lake only. Houseboats and the Dal Lake are widely associated with Srinigar and are nicknamed 'floating palaces', built according to British customs.The houseboats are generally made from local cedar-wood and are graded in a similar fashion to hotels according to level of comfort.Many of them have lavishly furnished rooms, with verandas and a terrace to serve as a sun-deck or to serve evening cocktails.They are mainly moored along the western periphery of the lake, close to the lakeside boulevard in the vicinity of the Dal gate and on small islands in the lake. They are anchored individually, with interconnecting bridges providing access from one boat to the other.The kitchen-boat is annexed to the main houseboat, which also serves as residence of the boatkeeper and his family.Many boats on Dal Lake are used for selling stuff to tourists. Anything like Artificial Jewellery, Corns, Fruits, Cloths, Wooden Articles, Flowers etc. Some of the vendors can be seen selling digital-cards for still/video cameras.        Each houseboat has an exclusive shikara for ferrying guests to the shore. A shikara is small paddled taxi boat, often about 15 feet and made of wood with a canopy and a spade shaped bottom.It is the cultural symbol of Kashmir and is used not only for ferrying visitors but is also used for the vending of fruits, vegetables and flowers and for the fishing and harvesting of aquatic vegetation.All gardens in the lake periphery and houseboats anchored in the lake are approachable through shikaras.The boats are often navigated by two boatmen dressed in 'Phiron' (traditional dress) and carry 'Kangris' or portable heaters on the boat.A shikara can seat about six people and have heavily cushioned seats and backrests to provide comfort in Mughul style.All houseboat owners provide shikara transport to their house guests free of charge. The shikara is also used to provide for other sightseeing locations in the valley, notably a cruise along the Jhelum River, offering scenic views of the Pir Panjal mountains and passing through the famous seven bridges and the backwaters enroute.

While tourists enjoy their Shikara Rides in Dal Lake, many other boats/Shikaras can be seen around the lake who sell stuff to tourists. These Shikara Rides are longer so things to eat & drink can be very easily found there. ABove photograph shows two gentlemen selling 'Bhutta' in Dal Lake. Usually you see two people in such Shikaras/Boats - One who rides and other keep offering products to tourists.

Dal Lake is one of the most popular lakes of India, which is located in Srinagar, the summer capital of Jammu and Kashmir. The urban lake, which is the second largest in the state, is integral to tourism and recreation in Kashmir and is nicknamed the 'Jewel in the crown of Kashmir' or 'Srinagar's Jewel'. The lake is also an important source for commercial operations in fishing and water plant harvesting.The shore line of the lake is encompassed by a boulevard lined with Mughal era gardens, parks, houseboats and hotels. Scenic views of the lake can be witnessed from the shore line Mughal gardens, such as Shalimar Bagh and Nishat Bagh built during the reign of Mughal Emperor Jahangir) and from houseboats cruising along the lake in the colourful shikaras. Dal Lake has some Floating gardens as well. The floating gardens, known as 'Rad' in Kashmiri, blossom with lotus flowers during July and August. The wetland is divided by causeways into four basins - Gagribal, Lokut Dal, Bod Dal and Nagin (although Nagin is also considered as an independent lake). During our trip to Shrinagar, we stayed in a hotel around Nagin lake only. Oldest Five star of the city is located on the bank of Nagin Lake. Lokut-dal and Bod-dal each have an island in the centre, known as Rup Lank (or Char Chinari) and Sona Lank respectively.  There are some personal houses around Dal Lake and people have their own boats to travel from one place to another for getting stuff from Lake-Market, which is again located inside Dal Lake only. Houseboats and the Dal Lake are widely associated with Srinigar and are nicknamed 'floating palaces', built according to British customs.The houseboats are generally made from local cedar-wood and are graded in a similar fashion to hotels according to level of comfort.Many of them have lavishly furnished rooms, with verandas and a terrace to serve as a sun-deck or to serve evening cocktails.They are mainly moored along the western periphery of the lake, close to the lakeside boulevard in the vicinity of the Dal gate and on small islands in the lake. They are anchored individually, with interconnecting bridges providing access from one boat to the other.The kitchen-boat is annexed to the main houseboat, which also serves as residence of the boatkeeper and his family.Many boats on Dal Lake are used for selling stuff to tourists. Anything like Artificial Jewellery, Corns, Fruits, Cloths, Wooden Articles, Flowers etc. Some of the vendors can be seen selling digital-cards for still/video cameras.        Each houseboat has an exclusive shikara for ferrying guests to the shore. A shikara is small paddled taxi boat, often about 15 feet and made of wood with a canopy and a spade shaped bottom.It is the cultural symbol of Kashmir and is used not only for ferrying visitors but is also used for the vending of fruits, vegetables and flowers and for the fishing and harvesting of aquatic vegetation.All gardens in the lake periphery and houseboats anchored in the lake are approachable through shikaras.The boats are often navigated by two boatmen dressed in 'Phiron' (traditional dress) and carry 'Kangris' or portable heaters on the boat.A shikara can seat about six people and have heavily cushioned seats and backrests to provide comfort in Mughul style.All houseboat owners provide shikara transport to their house guests free of charge. The shikara is also used to provide for other sightseeing locations in the valley, notably a cruise along the Jhelum River, offering scenic views of the Pir Panjal mountains and passing through the famous seven bridges and the backwaters enroute.

Here is a photograph of lady taking some stuff to her home which is located on the banks of Dal Lake. This was very usual to local folks/children riding shikaras/boats in Dal Lake.

Dal Lake is one of the most popular lakes of India, which is located in Srinagar, the summer capital of Jammu and Kashmir. The urban lake, which is the second largest in the state, is integral to tourism and recreation in Kashmir and is nicknamed the 'Jewel in the crown of Kashmir' or 'Srinagar's Jewel'. The lake is also an important source for commercial operations in fishing and water plant harvesting.The shore line of the lake is encompassed by a boulevard lined with Mughal era gardens, parks, houseboats and hotels. Scenic views of the lake can be witnessed from the shore line Mughal gardens, such as Shalimar Bagh and Nishat Bagh built during the reign of Mughal Emperor Jahangir) and from houseboats cruising along the lake in the colourful shikaras. Dal Lake has some Floating gardens as well. The floating gardens, known as 'Rad' in Kashmiri, blossom with lotus flowers during July and August. The wetland is divided by causeways into four basins - Gagribal, Lokut Dal, Bod Dal and Nagin (although Nagin is also considered as an independent lake). During our trip to Shrinagar, we stayed in a hotel around Nagin lake only. Oldest Five star of the city is located on the bank of Nagin Lake. Lokut-dal and Bod-dal each have an island in the centre, known as Rup Lank (or Char Chinari) and Sona Lank respectively.  There are some personal houses around Dal Lake and people have their own boats to travel from one place to another for getting stuff from Lake-Market, which is again located inside Dal Lake only. Houseboats and the Dal Lake are widely associated with Srinigar and are nicknamed 'floating palaces', built according to British customs.The houseboats are generally made from local cedar-wood and are graded in a similar fashion to hotels according to level of comfort.Many of them have lavishly furnished rooms, with verandas and a terrace to serve as a sun-deck or to serve evening cocktails.They are mainly moored along the western periphery of the lake, close to the lakeside boulevard in the vicinity of the Dal gate and on small islands in the lake. They are anchored individually, with interconnecting bridges providing access from one boat to the other.The kitchen-boat is annexed to the main houseboat, which also serves as residence of the boatkeeper and his family.Many boats on Dal Lake are used for selling stuff to tourists. Anything like Artificial Jewellery, Corns, Fruits, Cloths, Wooden Articles, Flowers etc. Some of the vendors can be seen selling digital-cards for still/video cameras.        Each houseboat has an exclusive shikara for ferrying guests to the shore. A shikara is small paddled taxi boat, often about 15 feet and made of wood with a canopy and a spade shaped bottom.It is the cultural symbol of Kashmir and is used not only for ferrying visitors but is also used for the vending of fruits, vegetables and flowers and for the fishing and harvesting of aquatic vegetation.All gardens in the lake periphery and houseboats anchored in the lake are approachable through shikaras.The boats are often navigated by two boatmen dressed in 'Phiron' (traditional dress) and carry 'Kangris' or portable heaters on the boat.A shikara can seat about six people and have heavily cushioned seats and backrests to provide comfort in Mughul style.All houseboat owners provide shikara transport to their house guests free of charge. The shikara is also used to provide for other sightseeing locations in the valley, notably a cruise along the Jhelum River, offering scenic views of the Pir Panjal mountains and passing through the famous seven bridges and the backwaters enroute.

Here is a photograph showing some of the houses on shoreline of Dal Lake.

Dal Lake is one of the most popular lakes of India, which is located in Srinagar, the summer capital of Jammu and Kashmir. The urban lake, which is the second largest in the state, is integral to tourism and recreation in Kashmir and is nicknamed the 'Jewel in the crown of Kashmir' or 'Srinagar's Jewel'. The lake is also an important source for commercial operations in fishing and water plant harvesting.The shore line of the lake is encompassed by a boulevard lined with Mughal era gardens, parks, houseboats and hotels. Scenic views of the lake can be witnessed from the shore line Mughal gardens, such as Shalimar Bagh and Nishat Bagh built during the reign of Mughal Emperor Jahangir) and from houseboats cruising along the lake in the colourful shikaras. Dal Lake has some Floating gardens as well. The floating gardens, known as 'Rad' in Kashmiri, blossom with lotus flowers during July and August. The wetland is divided by causeways into four basins - Gagribal, Lokut Dal, Bod Dal and Nagin (although Nagin is also considered as an independent lake). During our trip to Shrinagar, we stayed in a hotel around Nagin lake only. Oldest Five star of the city is located on the bank of Nagin Lake. Lokut-dal and Bod-dal each have an island in the centre, known as Rup Lank (or Char Chinari) and Sona Lank respectively.  There are some personal houses around Dal Lake and people have their own boats to travel from one place to another for getting stuff from Lake-Market, which is again located inside Dal Lake only. Houseboats and the Dal Lake are widely associated with Srinigar and are nicknamed 'floating palaces', built according to British customs.The houseboats are generally made from local cedar-wood and are graded in a similar fashion to hotels according to level of comfort.Many of them have lavishly furnished rooms, with verandas and a terrace to serve as a sun-deck or to serve evening cocktails.They are mainly moored along the western periphery of the lake, close to the lakeside boulevard in the vicinity of the Dal gate and on small islands in the lake. They are anchored individually, with interconnecting bridges providing access from one boat to the other.The kitchen-boat is annexed to the main houseboat, which also serves as residence of the boatkeeper and his family.Many boats on Dal Lake are used for selling stuff to tourists. Anything like Artificial Jewellery, Corns, Fruits, Cloths, Wooden Articles, Flowers etc. Some of the vendors can be seen selling digital-cards for still/video cameras.        Each houseboat has an exclusive shikara for ferrying guests to the shore. A shikara is small paddled taxi boat, often about 15 feet and made of wood with a canopy and a spade shaped bottom.It is the cultural symbol of Kashmir and is used not only for ferrying visitors but is also used for the vending of fruits, vegetables and flowers and for the fishing and harvesting of aquatic vegetation.All gardens in the lake periphery and houseboats anchored in the lake are approachable through shikaras.The boats are often navigated by two boatmen dressed in 'Phiron' (traditional dress) and carry 'Kangris' or portable heaters on the boat.A shikara can seat about six people and have heavily cushioned seats and backrests to provide comfort in Mughul style.All houseboat owners provide shikara transport to their house guests free of charge. The shikara is also used to provide for other sightseeing locations in the valley, notably a cruise along the Jhelum River, offering scenic views of the Pir Panjal mountains and passing through the famous seven bridges and the backwaters enroute.

We also noticed different types of birds around the lake and different types of Ducks floating around House-boats.

Dal Lake is one of the most popular lakes of India, which is located in Srinagar, the summer capital of Jammu and Kashmir. The urban lake, which is the second largest in the state, is integral to tourism and recreation in Kashmir and is nicknamed the 'Jewel in the crown of Kashmir' or 'Srinagar's Jewel'. The lake is also an important source for commercial operations in fishing and water plant harvesting.The shore line of the lake is encompassed by a boulevard lined with Mughal era gardens, parks, houseboats and hotels. Scenic views of the lake can be witnessed from the shore line Mughal gardens, such as Shalimar Bagh and Nishat Bagh built during the reign of Mughal Emperor Jahangir) and from houseboats cruising along the lake in the colourful shikaras. Dal Lake has some Floating gardens as well. The floating gardens, known as 'Rad' in Kashmiri, blossom with lotus flowers during July and August. The wetland is divided by causeways into four basins - Gagribal, Lokut Dal, Bod Dal and Nagin (although Nagin is also considered as an independent lake). During our trip to Shrinagar, we stayed in a hotel around Nagin lake only. Oldest Five star of the city is located on the bank of Nagin Lake. Lokut-dal and Bod-dal each have an island in the centre, known as Rup Lank (or Char Chinari) and Sona Lank respectively.  There are some personal houses around Dal Lake and people have their own boats to travel from one place to another for getting stuff from Lake-Market, which is again located inside Dal Lake only. Houseboats and the Dal Lake are widely associated with Srinigar and are nicknamed 'floating palaces', built according to British customs.The houseboats are generally made from local cedar-wood and are graded in a similar fashion to hotels according to level of comfort.Many of them have lavishly furnished rooms, with verandas and a terrace to serve as a sun-deck or to serve evening cocktails.They are mainly moored along the western periphery of the lake, close to the lakeside boulevard in the vicinity of the Dal gate and on small islands in the lake. They are anchored individually, with interconnecting bridges providing access from one boat to the other.The kitchen-boat is annexed to the main houseboat, which also serves as residence of the boatkeeper and his family.Many boats on Dal Lake are used for selling stuff to tourists. Anything like Artificial Jewellery, Corns, Fruits, Cloths, Wooden Articles, Flowers etc. Some of the vendors can be seen selling digital-cards for still/video cameras.        Each houseboat has an exclusive shikara for ferrying guests to the shore. A shikara is small paddled taxi boat, often about 15 feet and made of wood with a canopy and a spade shaped bottom.It is the cultural symbol of Kashmir and is used not only for ferrying visitors but is also used for the vending of fruits, vegetables and flowers and for the fishing and harvesting of aquatic vegetation.All gardens in the lake periphery and houseboats anchored in the lake are approachable through shikaras.The boats are often navigated by two boatmen dressed in 'Phiron' (traditional dress) and carry 'Kangris' or portable heaters on the boat.A shikara can seat about six people and have heavily cushioned seats and backrests to provide comfort in Mughul style.All houseboat owners provide shikara transport to their house guests free of charge. The shikara is also used to provide for other sightseeing locations in the valley, notably a cruise along the Jhelum River, offering scenic views of the Pir Panjal mountains and passing through the famous seven bridges and the backwaters enroute.

Dal lake is popular as a visitor attraction and a summer resort. Fisheries and the harvesting of food and fodder plants are also important on Dal Lake. Weeds from the lake are extracted and converted into compost for the gardens. It also serves as a flood lung of the Jhelum River. During our riding we also noticed many machines working on cleaning project of Dal Lake.

Dal Lake is one of the most popular lakes of India, which is located in Srinagar, the summer capital of Jammu and Kashmir. The urban lake, which is the second largest in the state, is integral to tourism and recreation in Kashmir and is nicknamed the 'Jewel in the crown of Kashmir' or 'Srinagar's Jewel'. The lake is also an important source for commercial operations in fishing and water plant harvesting.The shore line of the lake is encompassed by a boulevard lined with Mughal era gardens, parks, houseboats and hotels. Scenic views of the lake can be witnessed from the shore line Mughal gardens, such as Shalimar Bagh and Nishat Bagh built during the reign of Mughal Emperor Jahangir) and from houseboats cruising along the lake in the colourful shikaras. Dal Lake has some Floating gardens as well. The floating gardens, known as 'Rad' in Kashmiri, blossom with lotus flowers during July and August. The wetland is divided by causeways into four basins - Gagribal, Lokut Dal, Bod Dal and Nagin (although Nagin is also considered as an independent lake). During our trip to Shrinagar, we stayed in a hotel around Nagin lake only. Oldest Five star of the city is located on the bank of Nagin Lake. Lokut-dal and Bod-dal each have an island in the centre, known as Rup Lank (or Char Chinari) and Sona Lank respectively.  There are some personal houses around Dal Lake and people have their own boats to travel from one place to another for getting stuff from Lake-Market, which is again located inside Dal Lake only. Houseboats and the Dal Lake are widely associated with Srinigar and are nicknamed 'floating palaces', built according to British customs.The houseboats are generally made from local cedar-wood and are graded in a similar fashion to hotels according to level of comfort.Many of them have lavishly furnished rooms, with verandas and a terrace to serve as a sun-deck or to serve evening cocktails.They are mainly moored along the western periphery of the lake, close to the lakeside boulevard in the vicinity of the Dal gate and on small islands in the lake. They are anchored individually, with interconnecting bridges providing access from one boat to the other.The kitchen-boat is annexed to the main houseboat, which also serves as residence of the boatkeeper and his family.Many boats on Dal Lake are used for selling stuff to tourists. Anything like Artificial Jewellery, Corns, Fruits, Cloths, Wooden Articles, Flowers etc. Some of the vendors can be seen selling digital-cards for still/video cameras.        Each houseboat has an exclusive shikara for ferrying guests to the shore. A shikara is small paddled taxi boat, often about 15 feet and made of wood with a canopy and a spade shaped bottom.It is the cultural symbol of Kashmir and is used not only for ferrying visitors but is also used for the vending of fruits, vegetables and flowers and for the fishing and harvesting of aquatic vegetation.All gardens in the lake periphery and houseboats anchored in the lake are approachable through shikaras.The boats are often navigated by two boatmen dressed in 'Phiron' (traditional dress) and carry 'Kangris' or portable heaters on the boat.A shikara can seat about six people and have heavily cushioned seats and backrests to provide comfort in Mughul style.All houseboat owners provide shikara transport to their house guests free of charge. The shikara is also used to provide for other sightseeing locations in the valley, notably a cruise along the Jhelum River, offering scenic views of the Pir Panjal mountains and passing through the famous seven bridges and the backwaters enroute.

Dal lake has numerous sites and places of interest, many of which are important to the cultural heritage of Srinigar. Aside from the Shalimar Bagh and Nishat Bagh, some of the other places frequented by tourists are the Shankaracharya temple, the Hari Parbat, the Nagin Lake, the Chashme Shahi, the Hazratbal Shrine, the famous Kashmir houseboat and the shikara (boat) called the Gandola of Kashmir.

Dal Lake is one of the most popular lakes of India, which is located in Srinagar, the summer capital of Jammu and Kashmir. The urban lake, which is the second largest in the state, is integral to tourism and recreation in Kashmir and is nicknamed the 'Jewel in the crown of Kashmir' or 'Srinagar's Jewel'. The lake is also an important source for commercial operations in fishing and water plant harvesting.The shore line of the lake is encompassed by a boulevard lined with Mughal era gardens, parks, houseboats and hotels. Scenic views of the lake can be witnessed from the shore line Mughal gardens, such as Shalimar Bagh and Nishat Bagh built during the reign of Mughal Emperor Jahangir) and from houseboats cruising along the lake in the colourful shikaras. Dal Lake has some Floating gardens as well. The floating gardens, known as 'Rad' in Kashmiri, blossom with lotus flowers during July and August. The wetland is divided by causeways into four basins - Gagribal, Lokut Dal, Bod Dal and Nagin (although Nagin is also considered as an independent lake). During our trip to Shrinagar, we stayed in a hotel around Nagin lake only. Oldest Five star of the city is located on the bank of Nagin Lake. Lokut-dal and Bod-dal each have an island in the centre, known as Rup Lank (or Char Chinari) and Sona Lank respectively.  There are some personal houses around Dal Lake and people have their own boats to travel from one place to another for getting stuff from Lake-Market, which is again located inside Dal Lake only. Houseboats and the Dal Lake are widely associated with Srinigar and are nicknamed 'floating palaces', built according to British customs.The houseboats are generally made from local cedar-wood and are graded in a similar fashion to hotels according to level of comfort.Many of them have lavishly furnished rooms, with verandas and a terrace to serve as a sun-deck or to serve evening cocktails.They are mainly moored along the western periphery of the lake, close to the lakeside boulevard in the vicinity of the Dal gate and on small islands in the lake. They are anchored individually, with interconnecting bridges providing access from one boat to the other.The kitchen-boat is annexed to the main houseboat, which also serves as residence of the boatkeeper and his family.Many boats on Dal Lake are used for selling stuff to tourists. Anything like Artificial Jewellery, Corns, Fruits, Cloths, Wooden Articles, Flowers etc. Some of the vendors can be seen selling digital-cards for still/video cameras.        Each houseboat has an exclusive shikara for ferrying guests to the shore. A shikara is small paddled taxi boat, often about 15 feet and made of wood with a canopy and a spade shaped bottom.It is the cultural symbol of Kashmir and is used not only for ferrying visitors but is also used for the vending of fruits, vegetables and flowers and for the fishing and harvesting of aquatic vegetation.All gardens in the lake periphery and houseboats anchored in the lake are approachable through shikaras.The boats are often navigated by two boatmen dressed in 'Phiron' (traditional dress) and carry 'Kangris' or portable heaters on the boat.A shikara can seat about six people and have heavily cushioned seats and backrests to provide comfort in Mughul style.All houseboat owners provide shikara transport to their house guests free of charge. The shikara is also used to provide for other sightseeing locations in the valley, notably a cruise along the Jhelum River, offering scenic views of the Pir Panjal mountains and passing through the famous seven bridges and the backwaters enroute.

If you liked this post and found it helpful, I would request you to follow these things when traveling -

- Manage your waste well and don’t litter
- Use dustbins. Tell us if you went to a place and found it hard to locate a dustbin.
- Avoid bottle waters in hills. Usually you get clean water in hills and water bottles create lot of mess in our ecosystem.
- Say big no to plastic and avoid those unhealthy snacks packed in plastic bags. Rather buy fruits.
- Don't play loud blaring music in forests of jungle camps. You are a guest in that ecosystem and disturbing the locals (humans and animals) is not polite 

2 comments:

P.N. Subramanian said...

Beautiful photographs. I never imagined that Dal lake also has such areas. The first one showing a corner of the lake and a lady on the boat is awesome.

VJ Sharma said...

Thanks Subramanian Ji !

In fact many things in Dal Lake were surprising for us and we really felt like in heaven at that point of time.

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