A Pure Photo Journey from Dal Lake, Shrinagar, Jammu & Kashmir (India)

Dal Lake is one of the most popular lakes of India, which is located in Srinagar, the summer capital of Jammu and Kashmir. The urban lake, which is the second largest in the state, is integral to tourism and recreation in Kashmir and is nicknamed the 'Jewel in the crown of Kashmir' or 'Srinagar's Jewel'. The lake is also an important source for commercial operations in fishing and water plant harvesting.The shore line of the lake is encompassed by a boulevard lined with Mughal era gardens, parks, houseboats and hotels. Scenic views of the lake can be witnessed from the shore line Mughal gardens, such as Shalimar Bagh and Nishat Bagh built during the reign of Mughal Emperor Jahangir) and from houseboats cruising along the lake in the colourful shikaras. Dal Lake has some Floating gardens as well. The floating gardens, known as 'Rad' in Kashmiri, blossom with lotus flowers during July and August. The wetland is divided by causeways into four basins - Gagribal, Lokut Dal, Bod Dal and Nagin (although Nagin is also considered as an independent lake). During our trip to Shrinagar, we stayed in a hotel around Nagin lake only. Oldest Five star of the city is located on the bank of Nagin Lake. Lokut-dal and Bod-dal each have an island in the centre, known as Rup Lank (or Char Chinari) and Sona Lank respectively.  There are some personal houses around Dal Lake and people have their own boats to travel from one place to another for getting stuff from Lake-Market, which is again located inside Dal Lake only. Houseboats and the Dal Lake are widely associated with Srinigar and are nicknamed 'floating palaces', built according to British customs.The houseboats are generally made from local cedar-wood and are graded in a similar fashion to hotels according to level of comfort.Many of them have lavishly furnished rooms, with verandas and a terrace to serve as a sun-deck or to serve evening cocktails.They are mainly moored along the western periphery of the lake, close to the lakeside boulevard in the vicinity of the Dal gate and on small islands in the lake. They are anchored individually, with interconnecting bridges providing access from one boat to the other.The kitchen-boat is annexed to the main houseboat, which also serves as residence of the boatkeeper and his family.Many boats on Dal Lake are used for selling stuff to tourists. Anything like Artificial Jewellery, Corns, Fruits, Cloths, Wooden Articles, Flowers etc. Some of the vendors can be seen selling digital-cards for still/video cameras.        Each houseboat has an exclusive shikara for ferrying guests to the shore. A shikara is small paddled taxi boat, often about 15 feet and made of wood with a canopy and a spade shaped bottom.It is the cultural symbol of Kashmir and is used not only for ferrying visitors but is also used for the vending of fruits, vegetables and flowers and for the fishing and harvesting of aquatic vegetation.All gardens in the lake periphery and houseboats anchored in the lake are approachable through shikaras.The boats are often navigated by two boatmen dressed in 'Phiron' (traditional dress) and carry 'Kangris' or portable heaters on the boat.A shikara can seat about six people and have heavily cushioned seats and backrests to provide comfort in Mughul style.All houseboat owners provide shikara transport to their house guests free of charge. The shikara is also used to provide for other sightseeing locations in the valley, notably a cruise along the Jhelum River, offering scenic views of the Pir Panjal mountains and passing through the famous seven bridges and the backwaters enroute.


Dal Lake is one of the most popular lakes of India, which is located in Srinagar, the summer capital of Jammu and Kashmir. The urban lake, which is the second largest in the state, is integral to tourism and recreation in Kashmir and is nicknamed the 'Jewel in the crown of Kashmir' or 'Srinagar's Jewel'. The lake is also an important source for commercial operations in fishing and water plant harvesting.The shore line of the lake is encompassed by a boulevard lined with Mughal era gardens, parks, houseboats and hotels. Scenic views of the lake can be witnessed from the shore line Mughal gardens, such as Shalimar Bagh and Nishat Bagh built during the reign of Mughal Emperor Jahangir) and from houseboats cruising along the lake in the colourful shikaras. Dal Lake has some Floating gardens as well. The floating gardens, known as 'Rad' in Kashmiri, blossom with lotus flowers during July and August. The wetland is divided by causeways into four basins - Gagribal, Lokut Dal, Bod Dal and Nagin (although Nagin is also considered as an independent lake). During our trip to Shrinagar, we stayed in a hotel around Nagin lake only. Oldest Five star of the city is located on the bank of Nagin Lake. Lokut-dal and Bod-dal each have an island in the centre, known as Rup Lank (or Char Chinari) and Sona Lank respectively.  There are some personal houses around Dal Lake and people have their own boats to travel from one place to another for getting stuff from Lake-Market, which is again located inside Dal Lake only. Houseboats and the Dal Lake are widely associated with Srinigar and are nicknamed 'floating palaces', built according to British customs.The houseboats are generally made from local cedar-wood and are graded in a similar fashion to hotels according to level of comfort.Many of them have lavishly furnished rooms, with verandas and a terrace to serve as a sun-deck or to serve evening cocktails.They are mainly moored along the western periphery of the lake, close to the lakeside boulevard in the vicinity of the Dal gate and on small islands in the lake. They are anchored individually, with interconnecting bridges providing access from one boat to the other.The kitchen-boat is annexed to the main houseboat, which also serves as residence of the boatkeeper and his family.Many boats on Dal Lake are used for selling stuff to tourists. Anything like Artificial Jewellery, Corns, Fruits, Cloths, Wooden Articles, Flowers etc. Some of the vendors can be seen selling digital-cards for still/video cameras.        Each houseboat has an exclusive shikara for ferrying guests to the shore. A shikara is small paddled taxi boat, often about 15 feet and made of wood with a canopy and a spade shaped bottom.It is the cultural symbol of Kashmir and is used not only for ferrying visitors but is also used for the vending of fruits, vegetables and flowers and for the fishing and harvesting of aquatic vegetation.All gardens in the lake periphery and houseboats anchored in the lake are approachable through shikaras.The boats are often navigated by two boatmen dressed in 'Phiron' (traditional dress) and carry 'Kangris' or portable heaters on the boat.A shikara can seat about six people and have heavily cushioned seats and backrests to provide comfort in Mughul style.All houseboat owners provide shikara transport to their house guests free of charge. The shikara is also used to provide for other sightseeing locations in the valley, notably a cruise along the Jhelum River, offering scenic views of the Pir Panjal mountains and passing through the famous seven bridges and the backwaters enroute.

Dal Lake is one of the most popular lakes of India, which is located in Srinagar, the summer capital of Jammu and Kashmir. The urban lake, which is the second largest in the state, is integral to tourism and recreation in Kashmir and is nicknamed the 'Jewel in the crown of Kashmir' or 'Srinagar's Jewel'. The lake is also an important source for commercial operations in fishing and water plant harvesting.The shore line of the lake is encompassed by a boulevard lined with Mughal era gardens, parks, houseboats and hotels. Scenic views of the lake can be witnessed from the shore line Mughal gardens, such as Shalimar Bagh and Nishat Bagh built during the reign of Mughal Emperor Jahangir) and from houseboats cruising along the lake in the colourful shikaras. Dal Lake has some Floating gardens as well. The floating gardens, known as 'Rad' in Kashmiri, blossom with lotus flowers during July and August. The wetland is divided by causeways into four basins - Gagribal, Lokut Dal, Bod Dal and Nagin (although Nagin is also considered as an independent lake). During our trip to Shrinagar, we stayed in a hotel around Nagin lake only. Oldest Five star of the city is located on the bank of Nagin Lake. Lokut-dal and Bod-dal each have an island in the centre, known as Rup Lank (or Char Chinari) and Sona Lank respectively.  There are some personal houses around Dal Lake and people have their own boats to travel from one place to another for getting stuff from Lake-Market, which is again located inside Dal Lake only. Houseboats and the Dal Lake are widely associated with Srinigar and are nicknamed 'floating palaces', built according to British customs.The houseboats are generally made from local cedar-wood and are graded in a similar fashion to hotels according to level of comfort.Many of them have lavishly furnished rooms, with verandas and a terrace to serve as a sun-deck or to serve evening cocktails.They are mainly moored along the western periphery of the lake, close to the lakeside boulevard in the vicinity of the Dal gate and on small islands in the lake. They are anchored individually, with interconnecting bridges providing access from one boat to the other.The kitchen-boat is annexed to the main houseboat, which also serves as residence of the boatkeeper and his family.Many boats on Dal Lake are used for selling stuff to tourists. Anything like Artificial Jewellery, Corns, Fruits, Cloths, Wooden Articles, Flowers etc. Some of the vendors can be seen selling digital-cards for still/video cameras.        Each houseboat has an exclusive shikara for ferrying guests to the shore. A shikara is small paddled taxi boat, often about 15 feet and made of wood with a canopy and a spade shaped bottom.It is the cultural symbol of Kashmir and is used not only for ferrying visitors but is also used for the vending of fruits, vegetables and flowers and for the fishing and harvesting of aquatic vegetation.All gardens in the lake periphery and houseboats anchored in the lake are approachable through shikaras.The boats are often navigated by two boatmen dressed in 'Phiron' (traditional dress) and carry 'Kangris' or portable heaters on the boat.A shikara can seat about six people and have heavily cushioned seats and backrests to provide comfort in Mughul style.All houseboat owners provide shikara transport to their house guests free of charge. The shikara is also used to provide for other sightseeing locations in the valley, notably a cruise along the Jhelum River, offering scenic views of the Pir Panjal mountains and passing through the famous seven bridges and the backwaters enroute.

Dal Lake is one of the most popular lakes of India, which is located in Srinagar, the summer capital of Jammu and Kashmir. The urban lake, which is the second largest in the state, is integral to tourism and recreation in Kashmir and is nicknamed the 'Jewel in the crown of Kashmir' or 'Srinagar's Jewel'. The lake is also an important source for commercial operations in fishing and water plant harvesting.The shore line of the lake is encompassed by a boulevard lined with Mughal era gardens, parks, houseboats and hotels. Scenic views of the lake can be witnessed from the shore line Mughal gardens, such as Shalimar Bagh and Nishat Bagh built during the reign of Mughal Emperor Jahangir) and from houseboats cruising along the lake in the colourful shikaras. Dal Lake has some Floating gardens as well. The floating gardens, known as 'Rad' in Kashmiri, blossom with lotus flowers during July and August. The wetland is divided by causeways into four basins - Gagribal, Lokut Dal, Bod Dal and Nagin (although Nagin is also considered as an independent lake). During our trip to Shrinagar, we stayed in a hotel around Nagin lake only. Oldest Five star of the city is located on the bank of Nagin Lake. Lokut-dal and Bod-dal each have an island in the centre, known as Rup Lank (or Char Chinari) and Sona Lank respectively.  There are some personal houses around Dal Lake and people have their own boats to travel from one place to another for getting stuff from Lake-Market, which is again located inside Dal Lake only. Houseboats and the Dal Lake are widely associated with Srinigar and are nicknamed 'floating palaces', built according to British customs.The houseboats are generally made from local cedar-wood and are graded in a similar fashion to hotels according to level of comfort.Many of them have lavishly furnished rooms, with verandas and a terrace to serve as a sun-deck or to serve evening cocktails.They are mainly moored along the western periphery of the lake, close to the lakeside boulevard in the vicinity of the Dal gate and on small islands in the lake. They are anchored individually, with interconnecting bridges providing access from one boat to the other.The kitchen-boat is annexed to the main houseboat, which also serves as residence of the boatkeeper and his family.Many boats on Dal Lake are used for selling stuff to tourists. Anything like Artificial Jewellery, Corns, Fruits, Cloths, Wooden Articles, Flowers etc. Some of the vendors can be seen selling digital-cards for still/video cameras.        Each houseboat has an exclusive shikara for ferrying guests to the shore. A shikara is small paddled taxi boat, often about 15 feet and made of wood with a canopy and a spade shaped bottom.It is the cultural symbol of Kashmir and is used not only for ferrying visitors but is also used for the vending of fruits, vegetables and flowers and for the fishing and harvesting of aquatic vegetation.All gardens in the lake periphery and houseboats anchored in the lake are approachable through shikaras.The boats are often navigated by two boatmen dressed in 'Phiron' (traditional dress) and carry 'Kangris' or portable heaters on the boat.A shikara can seat about six people and have heavily cushioned seats and backrests to provide comfort in Mughul style.All houseboat owners provide shikara transport to their house guests free of charge. The shikara is also used to provide for other sightseeing locations in the valley, notably a cruise along the Jhelum River, offering scenic views of the Pir Panjal mountains and passing through the famous seven bridges and the backwaters enroute.

Dal Lake is one of the most popular lakes of India, which is located in Srinagar, the summer capital of Jammu and Kashmir. The urban lake, which is the second largest in the state, is integral to tourism and recreation in Kashmir and is nicknamed the 'Jewel in the crown of Kashmir' or 'Srinagar's Jewel'. The lake is also an important source for commercial operations in fishing and water plant harvesting.The shore line of the lake is encompassed by a boulevard lined with Mughal era gardens, parks, houseboats and hotels. Scenic views of the lake can be witnessed from the shore line Mughal gardens, such as Shalimar Bagh and Nishat Bagh built during the reign of Mughal Emperor Jahangir) and from houseboats cruising along the lake in the colourful shikaras. Dal Lake has some Floating gardens as well. The floating gardens, known as 'Rad' in Kashmiri, blossom with lotus flowers during July and August. The wetland is divided by causeways into four basins - Gagribal, Lokut Dal, Bod Dal and Nagin (although Nagin is also considered as an independent lake). During our trip to Shrinagar, we stayed in a hotel around Nagin lake only. Oldest Five star of the city is located on the bank of Nagin Lake. Lokut-dal and Bod-dal each have an island in the centre, known as Rup Lank (or Char Chinari) and Sona Lank respectively.  There are some personal houses around Dal Lake and people have their own boats to travel from one place to another for getting stuff from Lake-Market, which is again located inside Dal Lake only. Houseboats and the Dal Lake are widely associated with Srinigar and are nicknamed 'floating palaces', built according to British customs.The houseboats are generally made from local cedar-wood and are graded in a similar fashion to hotels according to level of comfort.Many of them have lavishly furnished rooms, with verandas and a terrace to serve as a sun-deck or to serve evening cocktails.They are mainly moored along the western periphery of the lake, close to the lakeside boulevard in the vicinity of the Dal gate and on small islands in the lake. They are anchored individually, with interconnecting bridges providing access from one boat to the other.The kitchen-boat is annexed to the main houseboat, which also serves as residence of the boatkeeper and his family.Many boats on Dal Lake are used for selling stuff to tourists. Anything like Artificial Jewellery, Corns, Fruits, Cloths, Wooden Articles, Flowers etc. Some of the vendors can be seen selling digital-cards for still/video cameras.        Each houseboat has an exclusive shikara for ferrying guests to the shore. A shikara is small paddled taxi boat, often about 15 feet and made of wood with a canopy and a spade shaped bottom.It is the cultural symbol of Kashmir and is used not only for ferrying visitors but is also used for the vending of fruits, vegetables and flowers and for the fishing and harvesting of aquatic vegetation.All gardens in the lake periphery and houseboats anchored in the lake are approachable through shikaras.The boats are often navigated by two boatmen dressed in 'Phiron' (traditional dress) and carry 'Kangris' or portable heaters on the boat.A shikara can seat about six people and have heavily cushioned seats and backrests to provide comfort in Mughul style.All houseboat owners provide shikara transport to their house guests free of charge. The shikara is also used to provide for other sightseeing locations in the valley, notably a cruise along the Jhelum River, offering scenic views of the Pir Panjal mountains and passing through the famous seven bridges and the backwaters enroute.

Dal Lake is one of the most popular lakes of India, which is located in Srinagar, the summer capital of Jammu and Kashmir. The urban lake, which is the second largest in the state, is integral to tourism and recreation in Kashmir and is nicknamed the 'Jewel in the crown of Kashmir' or 'Srinagar's Jewel'. The lake is also an important source for commercial operations in fishing and water plant harvesting.The shore line of the lake is encompassed by a boulevard lined with Mughal era gardens, parks, houseboats and hotels. Scenic views of the lake can be witnessed from the shore line Mughal gardens, such as Shalimar Bagh and Nishat Bagh built during the reign of Mughal Emperor Jahangir) and from houseboats cruising along the lake in the colourful shikaras. Dal Lake has some Floating gardens as well. The floating gardens, known as 'Rad' in Kashmiri, blossom with lotus flowers during July and August. The wetland is divided by causeways into four basins - Gagribal, Lokut Dal, Bod Dal and Nagin (although Nagin is also considered as an independent lake). During our trip to Shrinagar, we stayed in a hotel around Nagin lake only. Oldest Five star of the city is located on the bank of Nagin Lake. Lokut-dal and Bod-dal each have an island in the centre, known as Rup Lank (or Char Chinari) and Sona Lank respectively.  There are some personal houses around Dal Lake and people have their own boats to travel from one place to another for getting stuff from Lake-Market, which is again located inside Dal Lake only. Houseboats and the Dal Lake are widely associated with Srinigar and are nicknamed 'floating palaces', built according to British customs.The houseboats are generally made from local cedar-wood and are graded in a similar fashion to hotels according to level of comfort.Many of them have lavishly furnished rooms, with verandas and a terrace to serve as a sun-deck or to serve evening cocktails.They are mainly moored along the western periphery of the lake, close to the lakeside boulevard in the vicinity of the Dal gate and on small islands in the lake. They are anchored individually, with interconnecting bridges providing access from one boat to the other.The kitchen-boat is annexed to the main houseboat, which also serves as residence of the boatkeeper and his family.Many boats on Dal Lake are used for selling stuff to tourists. Anything like Artificial Jewellery, Corns, Fruits, Cloths, Wooden Articles, Flowers etc. Some of the vendors can be seen selling digital-cards for still/video cameras.        Each houseboat has an exclusive shikara for ferrying guests to the shore. A shikara is small paddled taxi boat, often about 15 feet and made of wood with a canopy and a spade shaped bottom.It is the cultural symbol of Kashmir and is used not only for ferrying visitors but is also used for the vending of fruits, vegetables and flowers and for the fishing and harvesting of aquatic vegetation.All gardens in the lake periphery and houseboats anchored in the lake are approachable through shikaras.The boats are often navigated by two boatmen dressed in 'Phiron' (traditional dress) and carry 'Kangris' or portable heaters on the boat.A shikara can seat about six people and have heavily cushioned seats and backrests to provide comfort in Mughul style.All houseboat owners provide shikara transport to their house guests free of charge. The shikara is also used to provide for other sightseeing locations in the valley, notably a cruise along the Jhelum River, offering scenic views of the Pir Panjal mountains and passing through the famous seven bridges and the backwaters enroute.

Dal Lake is one of the most popular lakes of India, which is located in Srinagar, the summer capital of Jammu and Kashmir. The urban lake, which is the second largest in the state, is integral to tourism and recreation in Kashmir and is nicknamed the 'Jewel in the crown of Kashmir' or 'Srinagar's Jewel'. The lake is also an important source for commercial operations in fishing and water plant harvesting.The shore line of the lake is encompassed by a boulevard lined with Mughal era gardens, parks, houseboats and hotels. Scenic views of the lake can be witnessed from the shore line Mughal gardens, such as Shalimar Bagh and Nishat Bagh built during the reign of Mughal Emperor Jahangir) and from houseboats cruising along the lake in the colourful shikaras. Dal Lake has some Floating gardens as well. The floating gardens, known as 'Rad' in Kashmiri, blossom with lotus flowers during July and August. The wetland is divided by causeways into four basins - Gagribal, Lokut Dal, Bod Dal and Nagin (although Nagin is also considered as an independent lake). During our trip to Shrinagar, we stayed in a hotel around Nagin lake only. Oldest Five star of the city is located on the bank of Nagin Lake. Lokut-dal and Bod-dal each have an island in the centre, known as Rup Lank (or Char Chinari) and Sona Lank respectively.  There are some personal houses around Dal Lake and people have their own boats to travel from one place to another for getting stuff from Lake-Market, which is again located inside Dal Lake only. Houseboats and the Dal Lake are widely associated with Srinigar and are nicknamed 'floating palaces', built according to British customs.The houseboats are generally made from local cedar-wood and are graded in a similar fashion to hotels according to level of comfort.Many of them have lavishly furnished rooms, with verandas and a terrace to serve as a sun-deck or to serve evening cocktails.They are mainly moored along the western periphery of the lake, close to the lakeside boulevard in the vicinity of the Dal gate and on small islands in the lake. They are anchored individually, with interconnecting bridges providing access from one boat to the other.The kitchen-boat is annexed to the main houseboat, which also serves as residence of the boatkeeper and his family.Many boats on Dal Lake are used for selling stuff to tourists. Anything like Artificial Jewellery, Corns, Fruits, Cloths, Wooden Articles, Flowers etc. Some of the vendors can be seen selling digital-cards for still/video cameras.        Each houseboat has an exclusive shikara for ferrying guests to the shore. A shikara is small paddled taxi boat, often about 15 feet and made of wood with a canopy and a spade shaped bottom.It is the cultural symbol of Kashmir and is used not only for ferrying visitors but is also used for the vending of fruits, vegetables and flowers and for the fishing and harvesting of aquatic vegetation.All gardens in the lake periphery and houseboats anchored in the lake are approachable through shikaras.The boats are often navigated by two boatmen dressed in 'Phiron' (traditional dress) and carry 'Kangris' or portable heaters on the boat.A shikara can seat about six people and have heavily cushioned seats and backrests to provide comfort in Mughul style.All houseboat owners provide shikara transport to their house guests free of charge. The shikara is also used to provide for other sightseeing locations in the valley, notably a cruise along the Jhelum River, offering scenic views of the Pir Panjal mountains and passing through the famous seven bridges and the backwaters enroute.

Dal Lake is one of the most popular lakes of India, which is located in Srinagar, the summer capital of Jammu and Kashmir. The urban lake, which is the second largest in the state, is integral to tourism and recreation in Kashmir and is nicknamed the 'Jewel in the crown of Kashmir' or 'Srinagar's Jewel'. The lake is also an important source for commercial operations in fishing and water plant harvesting.The shore line of the lake is encompassed by a boulevard lined with Mughal era gardens, parks, houseboats and hotels. Scenic views of the lake can be witnessed from the shore line Mughal gardens, such as Shalimar Bagh and Nishat Bagh built during the reign of Mughal Emperor Jahangir) and from houseboats cruising along the lake in the colourful shikaras. Dal Lake has some Floating gardens as well. The floating gardens, known as 'Rad' in Kashmiri, blossom with lotus flowers during July and August. The wetland is divided by causeways into four basins - Gagribal, Lokut Dal, Bod Dal and Nagin (although Nagin is also considered as an independent lake). During our trip to Shrinagar, we stayed in a hotel around Nagin lake only. Oldest Five star of the city is located on the bank of Nagin Lake. Lokut-dal and Bod-dal each have an island in the centre, known as Rup Lank (or Char Chinari) and Sona Lank respectively.  There are some personal houses around Dal Lake and people have their own boats to travel from one place to another for getting stuff from Lake-Market, which is again located inside Dal Lake only. Houseboats and the Dal Lake are widely associated with Srinigar and are nicknamed 'floating palaces', built according to British customs.The houseboats are generally made from local cedar-wood and are graded in a similar fashion to hotels according to level of comfort.Many of them have lavishly furnished rooms, with verandas and a terrace to serve as a sun-deck or to serve evening cocktails.They are mainly moored along the western periphery of the lake, close to the lakeside boulevard in the vicinity of the Dal gate and on small islands in the lake. They are anchored individually, with interconnecting bridges providing access from one boat to the other.The kitchen-boat is annexed to the main houseboat, which also serves as residence of the boatkeeper and his family.Many boats on Dal Lake are used for selling stuff to tourists. Anything like Artificial Jewellery, Corns, Fruits, Cloths, Wooden Articles, Flowers etc. Some of the vendors can be seen selling digital-cards for still/video cameras.        Each houseboat has an exclusive shikara for ferrying guests to the shore. A shikara is small paddled taxi boat, often about 15 feet and made of wood with a canopy and a spade shaped bottom.It is the cultural symbol of Kashmir and is used not only for ferrying visitors but is also used for the vending of fruits, vegetables and flowers and for the fishing and harvesting of aquatic vegetation.All gardens in the lake periphery and houseboats anchored in the lake are approachable through shikaras.The boats are often navigated by two boatmen dressed in 'Phiron' (traditional dress) and carry 'Kangris' or portable heaters on the boat.A shikara can seat about six people and have heavily cushioned seats and backrests to provide comfort in Mughul style.All houseboat owners provide shikara transport to their house guests free of charge. The shikara is also used to provide for other sightseeing locations in the valley, notably a cruise along the Jhelum River, offering scenic views of the Pir Panjal mountains and passing through the famous seven bridges and the backwaters enroute.

Dal Lake is one of the most popular lakes of India, which is located in Srinagar, the summer capital of Jammu and Kashmir. The urban lake, which is the second largest in the state, is integral to tourism and recreation in Kashmir and is nicknamed the 'Jewel in the crown of Kashmir' or 'Srinagar's Jewel'. The lake is also an important source for commercial operations in fishing and water plant harvesting.The shore line of the lake is encompassed by a boulevard lined with Mughal era gardens, parks, houseboats and hotels. Scenic views of the lake can be witnessed from the shore line Mughal gardens, such as Shalimar Bagh and Nishat Bagh built during the reign of Mughal Emperor Jahangir) and from houseboats cruising along the lake in the colourful shikaras. Dal Lake has some Floating gardens as well. The floating gardens, known as 'Rad' in Kashmiri, blossom with lotus flowers during July and August. The wetland is divided by causeways into four basins - Gagribal, Lokut Dal, Bod Dal and Nagin (although Nagin is also considered as an independent lake). During our trip to Shrinagar, we stayed in a hotel around Nagin lake only. Oldest Five star of the city is located on the bank of Nagin Lake. Lokut-dal and Bod-dal each have an island in the centre, known as Rup Lank (or Char Chinari) and Sona Lank respectively.  There are some personal houses around Dal Lake and people have their own boats to travel from one place to another for getting stuff from Lake-Market, which is again located inside Dal Lake only. Houseboats and the Dal Lake are widely associated with Srinigar and are nicknamed 'floating palaces', built according to British customs.The houseboats are generally made from local cedar-wood and are graded in a similar fashion to hotels according to level of comfort.Many of them have lavishly furnished rooms, with verandas and a terrace to serve as a sun-deck or to serve evening cocktails.They are mainly moored along the western periphery of the lake, close to the lakeside boulevard in the vicinity of the Dal gate and on small islands in the lake. They are anchored individually, with interconnecting bridges providing access from one boat to the other.The kitchen-boat is annexed to the main houseboat, which also serves as residence of the boatkeeper and his family.Many boats on Dal Lake are used for selling stuff to tourists. Anything like Artificial Jewellery, Corns, Fruits, Cloths, Wooden Articles, Flowers etc. Some of the vendors can be seen selling digital-cards for still/video cameras.        Each houseboat has an exclusive shikara for ferrying guests to the shore. A shikara is small paddled taxi boat, often about 15 feet and made of wood with a canopy and a spade shaped bottom.It is the cultural symbol of Kashmir and is used not only for ferrying visitors but is also used for the vending of fruits, vegetables and flowers and for the fishing and harvesting of aquatic vegetation.All gardens in the lake periphery and houseboats anchored in the lake are approachable through shikaras.The boats are often navigated by two boatmen dressed in 'Phiron' (traditional dress) and carry 'Kangris' or portable heaters on the boat.A shikara can seat about six people and have heavily cushioned seats and backrests to provide comfort in Mughul style.All houseboat owners provide shikara transport to their house guests free of charge. The shikara is also used to provide for other sightseeing locations in the valley, notably a cruise along the Jhelum River, offering scenic views of the Pir Panjal mountains and passing through the famous seven bridges and the backwaters enroute.

Dal Lake is one of the most popular lakes of India, which is located in Srinagar, the summer capital of Jammu and Kashmir. The urban lake, which is the second largest in the state, is integral to tourism and recreation in Kashmir and is nicknamed the 'Jewel in the crown of Kashmir' or 'Srinagar's Jewel'. The lake is also an important source for commercial operations in fishing and water plant harvesting.The shore line of the lake is encompassed by a boulevard lined with Mughal era gardens, parks, houseboats and hotels. Scenic views of the lake can be witnessed from the shore line Mughal gardens, such as Shalimar Bagh and Nishat Bagh built during the reign of Mughal Emperor Jahangir) and from houseboats cruising along the lake in the colourful shikaras. Dal Lake has some Floating gardens as well. The floating gardens, known as 'Rad' in Kashmiri, blossom with lotus flowers during July and August. The wetland is divided by causeways into four basins - Gagribal, Lokut Dal, Bod Dal and Nagin (although Nagin is also considered as an independent lake). During our trip to Shrinagar, we stayed in a hotel around Nagin lake only. Oldest Five star of the city is located on the bank of Nagin Lake. Lokut-dal and Bod-dal each have an island in the centre, known as Rup Lank (or Char Chinari) and Sona Lank respectively.  There are some personal houses around Dal Lake and people have their own boats to travel from one place to another for getting stuff from Lake-Market, which is again located inside Dal Lake only. Houseboats and the Dal Lake are widely associated with Srinigar and are nicknamed 'floating palaces', built according to British customs.The houseboats are generally made from local cedar-wood and are graded in a similar fashion to hotels according to level of comfort.Many of them have lavishly furnished rooms, with verandas and a terrace to serve as a sun-deck or to serve evening cocktails.They are mainly moored along the western periphery of the lake, close to the lakeside boulevard in the vicinity of the Dal gate and on small islands in the lake. They are anchored individually, with interconnecting bridges providing access from one boat to the other.The kitchen-boat is annexed to the main houseboat, which also serves as residence of the boatkeeper and his family.Many boats on Dal Lake are used for selling stuff to tourists. Anything like Artificial Jewellery, Corns, Fruits, Cloths, Wooden Articles, Flowers etc. Some of the vendors can be seen selling digital-cards for still/video cameras.        Each houseboat has an exclusive shikara for ferrying guests to the shore. A shikara is small paddled taxi boat, often about 15 feet and made of wood with a canopy and a spade shaped bottom.It is the cultural symbol of Kashmir and is used not only for ferrying visitors but is also used for the vending of fruits, vegetables and flowers and for the fishing and harvesting of aquatic vegetation.All gardens in the lake periphery and houseboats anchored in the lake are approachable through shikaras.The boats are often navigated by two boatmen dressed in 'Phiron' (traditional dress) and carry 'Kangris' or portable heaters on the boat.A shikara can seat about six people and have heavily cushioned seats and backrests to provide comfort in Mughul style.All houseboat owners provide shikara transport to their house guests free of charge. The shikara is also used to provide for other sightseeing locations in the valley, notably a cruise along the Jhelum River, offering scenic views of the Pir Panjal mountains and passing through the famous seven bridges and the backwaters enroute.

Dal Lake is one of the most popular lakes of India, which is located in Srinagar, the summer capital of Jammu and Kashmir. The urban lake, which is the second largest in the state, is integral to tourism and recreation in Kashmir and is nicknamed the 'Jewel in the crown of Kashmir' or 'Srinagar's Jewel'. The lake is also an important source for commercial operations in fishing and water plant harvesting.The shore line of the lake is encompassed by a boulevard lined with Mughal era gardens, parks, houseboats and hotels. Scenic views of the lake can be witnessed from the shore line Mughal gardens, such as Shalimar Bagh and Nishat Bagh built during the reign of Mughal Emperor Jahangir) and from houseboats cruising along the lake in the colourful shikaras. Dal Lake has some Floating gardens as well. The floating gardens, known as 'Rad' in Kashmiri, blossom with lotus flowers during July and August. The wetland is divided by causeways into four basins - Gagribal, Lokut Dal, Bod Dal and Nagin (although Nagin is also considered as an independent lake). During our trip to Shrinagar, we stayed in a hotel around Nagin lake only. Oldest Five star of the city is located on the bank of Nagin Lake. Lokut-dal and Bod-dal each have an island in the centre, known as Rup Lank (or Char Chinari) and Sona Lank respectively.  There are some personal houses around Dal Lake and people have their own boats to travel from one place to another for getting stuff from Lake-Market, which is again located inside Dal Lake only. Houseboats and the Dal Lake are widely associated with Srinigar and are nicknamed 'floating palaces', built according to British customs.The houseboats are generally made from local cedar-wood and are graded in a similar fashion to hotels according to level of comfort.Many of them have lavishly furnished rooms, with verandas and a terrace to serve as a sun-deck or to serve evening cocktails.They are mainly moored along the western periphery of the lake, close to the lakeside boulevard in the vicinity of the Dal gate and on small islands in the lake. They are anchored individually, with interconnecting bridges providing access from one boat to the other.The kitchen-boat is annexed to the main houseboat, which also serves as residence of the boatkeeper and his family.Many boats on Dal Lake are used for selling stuff to tourists. Anything like Artificial Jewellery, Corns, Fruits, Cloths, Wooden Articles, Flowers etc. Some of the vendors can be seen selling digital-cards for still/video cameras.        Each houseboat has an exclusive shikara for ferrying guests to the shore. A shikara is small paddled taxi boat, often about 15 feet and made of wood with a canopy and a spade shaped bottom.It is the cultural symbol of Kashmir and is used not only for ferrying visitors but is also used for the vending of fruits, vegetables and flowers and for the fishing and harvesting of aquatic vegetation.All gardens in the lake periphery and houseboats anchored in the lake are approachable through shikaras.The boats are often navigated by two boatmen dressed in 'Phiron' (traditional dress) and carry 'Kangris' or portable heaters on the boat.A shikara can seat about six people and have heavily cushioned seats and backrests to provide comfort in Mughul style.All houseboat owners provide shikara transport to their house guests free of charge. The shikara is also used to provide for other sightseeing locations in the valley, notably a cruise along the Jhelum River, offering scenic views of the Pir Panjal mountains and passing through the famous seven bridges and the backwaters enroute.

Dal Lake is one of the most popular lakes of India, which is located in Srinagar, the summer capital of Jammu and Kashmir. The urban lake, which is the second largest in the state, is integral to tourism and recreation in Kashmir and is nicknamed the 'Jewel in the crown of Kashmir' or 'Srinagar's Jewel'. The lake is also an important source for commercial operations in fishing and water plant harvesting.The shore line of the lake is encompassed by a boulevard lined with Mughal era gardens, parks, houseboats and hotels. Scenic views of the lake can be witnessed from the shore line Mughal gardens, such as Shalimar Bagh and Nishat Bagh built during the reign of Mughal Emperor Jahangir) and from houseboats cruising along the lake in the colourful shikaras. Dal Lake has some Floating gardens as well. The floating gardens, known as 'Rad' in Kashmiri, blossom with lotus flowers during July and August. The wetland is divided by causeways into four basins - Gagribal, Lokut Dal, Bod Dal and Nagin (although Nagin is also considered as an independent lake). During our trip to Shrinagar, we stayed in a hotel around Nagin lake only. Oldest Five star of the city is located on the bank of Nagin Lake. Lokut-dal and Bod-dal each have an island in the centre, known as Rup Lank (or Char Chinari) and Sona Lank respectively.  There are some personal houses around Dal Lake and people have their own boats to travel from one place to another for getting stuff from Lake-Market, which is again located inside Dal Lake only. Houseboats and the Dal Lake are widely associated with Srinigar and are nicknamed 'floating palaces', built according to British customs.The houseboats are generally made from local cedar-wood and are graded in a similar fashion to hotels according to level of comfort.Many of them have lavishly furnished rooms, with verandas and a terrace to serve as a sun-deck or to serve evening cocktails.They are mainly moored along the western periphery of the lake, close to the lakeside boulevard in the vicinity of the Dal gate and on small islands in the lake. They are anchored individually, with interconnecting bridges providing access from one boat to the other.The kitchen-boat is annexed to the main houseboat, which also serves as residence of the boatkeeper and his family.Many boats on Dal Lake are used for selling stuff to tourists. Anything like Artificial Jewellery, Corns, Fruits, Cloths, Wooden Articles, Flowers etc. Some of the vendors can be seen selling digital-cards for still/video cameras.        Each houseboat has an exclusive shikara for ferrying guests to the shore. A shikara is small paddled taxi boat, often about 15 feet and made of wood with a canopy and a spade shaped bottom.It is the cultural symbol of Kashmir and is used not only for ferrying visitors but is also used for the vending of fruits, vegetables and flowers and for the fishing and harvesting of aquatic vegetation.All gardens in the lake periphery and houseboats anchored in the lake are approachable through shikaras.The boats are often navigated by two boatmen dressed in 'Phiron' (traditional dress) and carry 'Kangris' or portable heaters on the boat.A shikara can seat about six people and have heavily cushioned seats and backrests to provide comfort in Mughul style.All houseboat owners provide shikara transport to their house guests free of charge. The shikara is also used to provide for other sightseeing locations in the valley, notably a cruise along the Jhelum River, offering scenic views of the Pir Panjal mountains and passing through the famous seven bridges and the backwaters enroute.

5 comments:

Vetrimagal said...

Can I pluck that flower please?

Wonderful glimpses. Thanks for sharing.

Ghazala Hossain said...

I have one word, awesome for all pictures :)

GvSparx - Inspiring Lives said...

Nice photos :)
Shed some light on psd techniqes used for water images :)

VJ Sharma said...

Thanks Vetrimagal, Ghazala & Gv !

@Gv - psd techniques?

vkumar said...

nice looking pic in houseboat.

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