The Hermitage - A Green Maze Through the Craigvinean Forest

After starting from Dunkeld (read about my stay in Dunkeld here), we reached the parking space near the Hermitage in what seemed like five minutes. Upon deboarding the little bus, we realized that we were in a lush green forest with towering trees and, apparently, there was a river thundering through it somewhere nearby. When our guide mentioned a walk through the woods, we were all eager to comply.

The Hermitage - A Green Maze Through the Craigvinean Forest, Douglas-fir trees, Dunkeld, Forestm River Braan, Ossian's Hall of Mirrors, The Hermitage, Young Giants, After starting from Dunkeld (read about my stay in Dunkeld here), we reached the parking space near the Hermitage in what seemed like five minutes. Upon deboarding the little bus, we realized that we were in a lush green forest with towering trees and, apparently, there was a river thundering through it somewhere nearby. When our guide mentioned a walk through the woods, we were all eager to comply.The Hermitage is a National Trust of Scotland-protected site in Dunkeld, Perth and Kinross, Scotland. Officially it is known as The Hermitage Pleasure Ground and has several walks running through it. The most popular is the 1 km (0.75 mile) long walk to the Ossian's Hall of Mirrors. This was the walk that we were about to embark upon. We followed our kilted guide, Ross (on the right), into the forest. Rains still continued and adding to the fun of getting drenched was the water that dripped off the leaves of the tall trees surrounding us.Tall Douglas-firs formed most of the tree canopy overhead. These trees can reach a height of 200 ft at comparatively young ages and are, therefore, called the Young Giants. All around us, these trees rose from the ground and reached straight out to touch the sky. From our position on the ground, it seemed as if they were successful in their mission. Even though these trees weren't beenstalks, their tops seemed to end in the clouds, above which some magical world existed in parallel with our world. At this point, we wouldn't have been surprised if an elf had hopped out of the forest cover. Because of the ample moisture, moss covered most of the visible surfaces. The woods were fragrant with the smell of moisture and greenery. A trip into these forests makes one question why the human kind chose the concrete forest over this green forest. Such innocent beauty can never be found amidst the grey, dead walls bricks and cement.The bright orange foliage made its appearance every now and then as if to remind us that Autumn was almost upon us and very soon the rain would turn to snow and it would be too cold to venture into the wild.And finally, we chanced upon the Black Linn Falls where the mischievous, noisy river crashed upon the rocks it had smoothened over the centuries. Brown with the silt that it had cut out of its banks and beds, it gushed with anticipation towards the River Tay like a child that excitedly annouces to the entire world that it is on its way to visit its grandma.Here's a short video of the Black Linn Falls to give you a feel of the scene. Wish I could capture the scent of the scene and the feel of the gentle spray as well.Now we were approaching the Ossian's Hall of Mirrors. This little Hut once used to be an inspiration for writers and poets alike. It once used to house a room lined with mirrors all of which used to reflect the tumultous Black Linn Falls. The Hall was built to honour the blind bard Ossian who, as legends have it, wrote spectacular poetry in the 3rd Century. This is an internal door inside the Hall and the image painted on it is of the Bard Ossian. This door opens into a room that provides the view of the falls. What remains today is a toned down version of what used to a gaudy visitor attraction. And then we came to the end of our short walk. The rain still accompanied us and didn't show any signs of stopping. It looked as if we would be spending the next stop too getting drenched. But by now we had reconciled ourselves and had decided to make the most of our trip nevertheless. After all, one does not get the opportunity of visiting the remote parts of Scotland too easily. Watch out for the next part. It will follow soon...

The Hermitage is a National Trust of Scotland-protected site in Dunkeld, Perth and Kinross, Scotland. Officially it is known as The Hermitage Pleasure Ground and has several walks running through it. The most popular is the 1 km (0.75 mile) long walk to the Ossian's Hall of Mirrors. This was the walk that we were about to embark upon.

The Hermitage - A Green Maze Through the Craigvinean Forest, Douglas-fir trees, Dunkeld, Forestm River Braan, Ossian's Hall of Mirrors, The Hermitage, Young Giants, After starting from Dunkeld (read about my stay in Dunkeld here), we reached the parking space near the Hermitage in what seemed like five minutes. Upon deboarding the little bus, we realized that we were in a lush green forest with towering trees and, apparently, there was a river thundering through it somewhere nearby. When our guide mentioned a walk through the woods, we were all eager to comply.The Hermitage is a National Trust of Scotland-protected site in Dunkeld, Perth and Kinross, Scotland. Officially it is known as The Hermitage Pleasure Ground and has several walks running through it. The most popular is the 1 km (0.75 mile) long walk to the Ossian's Hall of Mirrors. This was the walk that we were about to embark upon. We followed our kilted guide, Ross (on the right), into the forest. Rains still continued and adding to the fun of getting drenched was the water that dripped off the leaves of the tall trees surrounding us.Tall Douglas-firs formed most of the tree canopy overhead. These trees can reach a height of 200 ft at comparatively young ages and are, therefore, called the Young Giants. All around us, these trees rose from the ground and reached straight out to touch the sky. From our position on the ground, it seemed as if they were successful in their mission. Even though these trees weren't beenstalks, their tops seemed to end in the clouds, above which some magical world existed in parallel with our world. At this point, we wouldn't have been surprised if an elf had hopped out of the forest cover. Because of the ample moisture, moss covered most of the visible surfaces. The woods were fragrant with the smell of moisture and greenery. A trip into these forests makes one question why the human kind chose the concrete forest over this green forest. Such innocent beauty can never be found amidst the grey, dead walls bricks and cement.The bright orange foliage made its appearance every now and then as if to remind us that Autumn was almost upon us and very soon the rain would turn to snow and it would be too cold to venture into the wild.And finally, we chanced upon the Black Linn Falls where the mischievous, noisy river crashed upon the rocks it had smoothened over the centuries. Brown with the silt that it had cut out of its banks and beds, it gushed with anticipation towards the River Tay like a child that excitedly annouces to the entire world that it is on its way to visit its grandma.Here's a short video of the Black Linn Falls to give you a feel of the scene. Wish I could capture the scent of the scene and the feel of the gentle spray as well.Now we were approaching the Ossian's Hall of Mirrors. This little Hut once used to be an inspiration for writers and poets alike. It once used to house a room lined with mirrors all of which used to reflect the tumultous Black Linn Falls. The Hall was built to honour the blind bard Ossian who, as legends have it, wrote spectacular poetry in the 3rd Century. This is an internal door inside the Hall and the image painted on it is of the Bard Ossian. This door opens into a room that provides the view of the falls. What remains today is a toned down version of what used to a gaudy visitor attraction. And then we came to the end of our short walk. The rain still accompanied us and didn't show any signs of stopping. It looked as if we would be spending the next stop too getting drenched. But by now we had reconciled ourselves and had decided to make the most of our trip nevertheless. After all, one does not get the opportunity of visiting the remote parts of Scotland too easily. Watch out for the next part. It will follow soon...
We followed our kilted guide, Ross (on the right), into the forest. Rains still continued and adding to the fun of getting drenched was the water that dripped off the leaves of the tall trees surrounding us.

The Hermitage - A Green Maze Through the Craigvinean Forest, Douglas-fir trees, Dunkeld, Forestm River Braan, Ossian's Hall of Mirrors, The Hermitage, Young Giants, After starting from Dunkeld (read about my stay in Dunkeld here), we reached the parking space near the Hermitage in what seemed like five minutes. Upon deboarding the little bus, we realized that we were in a lush green forest with towering trees and, apparently, there was a river thundering through it somewhere nearby. When our guide mentioned a walk through the woods, we were all eager to comply.The Hermitage is a National Trust of Scotland-protected site in Dunkeld, Perth and Kinross, Scotland. Officially it is known as The Hermitage Pleasure Ground and has several walks running through it. The most popular is the 1 km (0.75 mile) long walk to the Ossian's Hall of Mirrors. This was the walk that we were about to embark upon. We followed our kilted guide, Ross (on the right), into the forest. Rains still continued and adding to the fun of getting drenched was the water that dripped off the leaves of the tall trees surrounding us.Tall Douglas-firs formed most of the tree canopy overhead. These trees can reach a height of 200 ft at comparatively young ages and are, therefore, called the Young Giants. All around us, these trees rose from the ground and reached straight out to touch the sky. From our position on the ground, it seemed as if they were successful in their mission. Even though these trees weren't beenstalks, their tops seemed to end in the clouds, above which some magical world existed in parallel with our world. At this point, we wouldn't have been surprised if an elf had hopped out of the forest cover. Because of the ample moisture, moss covered most of the visible surfaces. The woods were fragrant with the smell of moisture and greenery. A trip into these forests makes one question why the human kind chose the concrete forest over this green forest. Such innocent beauty can never be found amidst the grey, dead walls bricks and cement.The bright orange foliage made its appearance every now and then as if to remind us that Autumn was almost upon us and very soon the rain would turn to snow and it would be too cold to venture into the wild.And finally, we chanced upon the Black Linn Falls where the mischievous, noisy river crashed upon the rocks it had smoothened over the centuries. Brown with the silt that it had cut out of its banks and beds, it gushed with anticipation towards the River Tay like a child that excitedly annouces to the entire world that it is on its way to visit its grandma.Here's a short video of the Black Linn Falls to give you a feel of the scene. Wish I could capture the scent of the scene and the feel of the gentle spray as well.Now we were approaching the Ossian's Hall of Mirrors. This little Hut once used to be an inspiration for writers and poets alike. It once used to house a room lined with mirrors all of which used to reflect the tumultous Black Linn Falls. The Hall was built to honour the blind bard Ossian who, as legends have it, wrote spectacular poetry in the 3rd Century. This is an internal door inside the Hall and the image painted on it is of the Bard Ossian. This door opens into a room that provides the view of the falls. What remains today is a toned down version of what used to a gaudy visitor attraction. And then we came to the end of our short walk. The rain still accompanied us and didn't show any signs of stopping. It looked as if we would be spending the next stop too getting drenched. But by now we had reconciled ourselves and had decided to make the most of our trip nevertheless. After all, one does not get the opportunity of visiting the remote parts of Scotland too easily. Watch out for the next part. It will follow soon...
Tall Douglas-firs formed most of the tree canopy overhead. These trees can reach a height of 200 ft at comparatively young ages and are, therefore, called the Young Giants.

The Hermitage - A Green Maze Through the Craigvinean Forest, Douglas-fir trees, Dunkeld, Forestm River Braan, Ossian's Hall of Mirrors, The Hermitage, Young Giants, After starting from Dunkeld (read about my stay in Dunkeld here), we reached the parking space near the Hermitage in what seemed like five minutes. Upon deboarding the little bus, we realized that we were in a lush green forest with towering trees and, apparently, there was a river thundering through it somewhere nearby. When our guide mentioned a walk through the woods, we were all eager to comply.The Hermitage is a National Trust of Scotland-protected site in Dunkeld, Perth and Kinross, Scotland. Officially it is known as The Hermitage Pleasure Ground and has several walks running through it. The most popular is the 1 km (0.75 mile) long walk to the Ossian's Hall of Mirrors. This was the walk that we were about to embark upon. We followed our kilted guide, Ross (on the right), into the forest. Rains still continued and adding to the fun of getting drenched was the water that dripped off the leaves of the tall trees surrounding us.Tall Douglas-firs formed most of the tree canopy overhead. These trees can reach a height of 200 ft at comparatively young ages and are, therefore, called the Young Giants. All around us, these trees rose from the ground and reached straight out to touch the sky. From our position on the ground, it seemed as if they were successful in their mission. Even though these trees weren't beenstalks, their tops seemed to end in the clouds, above which some magical world existed in parallel with our world. At this point, we wouldn't have been surprised if an elf had hopped out of the forest cover. Because of the ample moisture, moss covered most of the visible surfaces. The woods were fragrant with the smell of moisture and greenery. A trip into these forests makes one question why the human kind chose the concrete forest over this green forest. Such innocent beauty can never be found amidst the grey, dead walls bricks and cement.The bright orange foliage made its appearance every now and then as if to remind us that Autumn was almost upon us and very soon the rain would turn to snow and it would be too cold to venture into the wild.And finally, we chanced upon the Black Linn Falls where the mischievous, noisy river crashed upon the rocks it had smoothened over the centuries. Brown with the silt that it had cut out of its banks and beds, it gushed with anticipation towards the River Tay like a child that excitedly annouces to the entire world that it is on its way to visit its grandma.Here's a short video of the Black Linn Falls to give you a feel of the scene. Wish I could capture the scent of the scene and the feel of the gentle spray as well.Now we were approaching the Ossian's Hall of Mirrors. This little Hut once used to be an inspiration for writers and poets alike. It once used to house a room lined with mirrors all of which used to reflect the tumultous Black Linn Falls. The Hall was built to honour the blind bard Ossian who, as legends have it, wrote spectacular poetry in the 3rd Century. This is an internal door inside the Hall and the image painted on it is of the Bard Ossian. This door opens into a room that provides the view of the falls. What remains today is a toned down version of what used to a gaudy visitor attraction. And then we came to the end of our short walk. The rain still accompanied us and didn't show any signs of stopping. It looked as if we would be spending the next stop too getting drenched. But by now we had reconciled ourselves and had decided to make the most of our trip nevertheless. After all, one does not get the opportunity of visiting the remote parts of Scotland too easily. Watch out for the next part. It will follow soon...
All around us, these trees rose from the ground and reached straight out to touch the sky. From our position on the ground, it seemed as if they were successful in their mission. Even though these trees weren't beenstalks, their tops seemed to end in the clouds, above which some magical world existed in parallel with our world. At this point, we wouldn't have been surprised if an elf had hopped out of the forest cover.
The Hermitage - A Green Maze Through the Craigvinean Forest, Douglas-fir trees, Dunkeld, Forestm River Braan, Ossian's Hall of Mirrors, The Hermitage, Young Giants, After starting from Dunkeld (read about my stay in Dunkeld here), we reached the parking space near the Hermitage in what seemed like five minutes. Upon deboarding the little bus, we realized that we were in a lush green forest with towering trees and, apparently, there was a river thundering through it somewhere nearby. When our guide mentioned a walk through the woods, we were all eager to comply.The Hermitage is a National Trust of Scotland-protected site in Dunkeld, Perth and Kinross, Scotland. Officially it is known as The Hermitage Pleasure Ground and has several walks running through it. The most popular is the 1 km (0.75 mile) long walk to the Ossian's Hall of Mirrors. This was the walk that we were about to embark upon. We followed our kilted guide, Ross (on the right), into the forest. Rains still continued and adding to the fun of getting drenched was the water that dripped off the leaves of the tall trees surrounding us.Tall Douglas-firs formed most of the tree canopy overhead. These trees can reach a height of 200 ft at comparatively young ages and are, therefore, called the Young Giants. All around us, these trees rose from the ground and reached straight out to touch the sky. From our position on the ground, it seemed as if they were successful in their mission. Even though these trees weren't beenstalks, their tops seemed to end in the clouds, above which some magical world existed in parallel with our world. At this point, we wouldn't have been surprised if an elf had hopped out of the forest cover. Because of the ample moisture, moss covered most of the visible surfaces. The woods were fragrant with the smell of moisture and greenery. A trip into these forests makes one question why the human kind chose the concrete forest over this green forest. Such innocent beauty can never be found amidst the grey, dead walls bricks and cement.The bright orange foliage made its appearance every now and then as if to remind us that Autumn was almost upon us and very soon the rain would turn to snow and it would be too cold to venture into the wild.And finally, we chanced upon the Black Linn Falls where the mischievous, noisy river crashed upon the rocks it had smoothened over the centuries. Brown with the silt that it had cut out of its banks and beds, it gushed with anticipation towards the River Tay like a child that excitedly annouces to the entire world that it is on its way to visit its grandma.Here's a short video of the Black Linn Falls to give you a feel of the scene. Wish I could capture the scent of the scene and the feel of the gentle spray as well.Now we were approaching the Ossian's Hall of Mirrors. This little Hut once used to be an inspiration for writers and poets alike. It once used to house a room lined with mirrors all of which used to reflect the tumultous Black Linn Falls. The Hall was built to honour the blind bard Ossian who, as legends have it, wrote spectacular poetry in the 3rd Century. This is an internal door inside the Hall and the image painted on it is of the Bard Ossian. This door opens into a room that provides the view of the falls. What remains today is a toned down version of what used to a gaudy visitor attraction. And then we came to the end of our short walk. The rain still accompanied us and didn't show any signs of stopping. It looked as if we would be spending the next stop too getting drenched. But by now we had reconciled ourselves and had decided to make the most of our trip nevertheless. After all, one does not get the opportunity of visiting the remote parts of Scotland too easily. Watch out for the next part. It will follow soon...
Because of the ample moisture, moss covered most of the visible surfaces. The woods were fragrant with the smell of moisture and greenery. A trip into these forests makes one question why the human kind chose the concrete forest over this green forest. Such innocent beauty can never be found amidst the grey, dead walls bricks and cement.
The Hermitage - A Green Maze Through the Craigvinean Forest, Douglas-fir trees, Dunkeld, Forestm River Braan, Ossian's Hall of Mirrors, The Hermitage, Young Giants, After starting from Dunkeld (read about my stay in Dunkeld here), we reached the parking space near the Hermitage in what seemed like five minutes. Upon deboarding the little bus, we realized that we were in a lush green forest with towering trees and, apparently, there was a river thundering through it somewhere nearby. When our guide mentioned a walk through the woods, we were all eager to comply.The Hermitage is a National Trust of Scotland-protected site in Dunkeld, Perth and Kinross, Scotland. Officially it is known as The Hermitage Pleasure Ground and has several walks running through it. The most popular is the 1 km (0.75 mile) long walk to the Ossian's Hall of Mirrors. This was the walk that we were about to embark upon. We followed our kilted guide, Ross (on the right), into the forest. Rains still continued and adding to the fun of getting drenched was the water that dripped off the leaves of the tall trees surrounding us.Tall Douglas-firs formed most of the tree canopy overhead. These trees can reach a height of 200 ft at comparatively young ages and are, therefore, called the Young Giants. All around us, these trees rose from the ground and reached straight out to touch the sky. From our position on the ground, it seemed as if they were successful in their mission. Even though these trees weren't beenstalks, their tops seemed to end in the clouds, above which some magical world existed in parallel with our world. At this point, we wouldn't have been surprised if an elf had hopped out of the forest cover. Because of the ample moisture, moss covered most of the visible surfaces. The woods were fragrant with the smell of moisture and greenery. A trip into these forests makes one question why the human kind chose the concrete forest over this green forest. Such innocent beauty can never be found amidst the grey, dead walls bricks and cement.The bright orange foliage made its appearance every now and then as if to remind us that Autumn was almost upon us and very soon the rain would turn to snow and it would be too cold to venture into the wild.And finally, we chanced upon the Black Linn Falls where the mischievous, noisy river crashed upon the rocks it had smoothened over the centuries. Brown with the silt that it had cut out of its banks and beds, it gushed with anticipation towards the River Tay like a child that excitedly annouces to the entire world that it is on its way to visit its grandma.Here's a short video of the Black Linn Falls to give you a feel of the scene. Wish I could capture the scent of the scene and the feel of the gentle spray as well.Now we were approaching the Ossian's Hall of Mirrors. This little Hut once used to be an inspiration for writers and poets alike. It once used to house a room lined with mirrors all of which used to reflect the tumultous Black Linn Falls. The Hall was built to honour the blind bard Ossian who, as legends have it, wrote spectacular poetry in the 3rd Century. This is an internal door inside the Hall and the image painted on it is of the Bard Ossian. This door opens into a room that provides the view of the falls. What remains today is a toned down version of what used to a gaudy visitor attraction. And then we came to the end of our short walk. The rain still accompanied us and didn't show any signs of stopping. It looked as if we would be spending the next stop too getting drenched. But by now we had reconciled ourselves and had decided to make the most of our trip nevertheless. After all, one does not get the opportunity of visiting the remote parts of Scotland too easily. Watch out for the next part. It will follow soon...
The bright orange foliage made its appearance every now and then as if to remind us that Autumn was almost upon us and very soon the rain would turn to snow and it would be too cold to venture into the wild.

The Hermitage - A Green Maze Through the Craigvinean Forest, Douglas-fir trees, Dunkeld, Forestm River Braan, Ossian's Hall of Mirrors, The Hermitage, Young Giants, After starting from Dunkeld (read about my stay in Dunkeld here), we reached the parking space near the Hermitage in what seemed like five minutes. Upon deboarding the little bus, we realized that we were in a lush green forest with towering trees and, apparently, there was a river thundering through it somewhere nearby. When our guide mentioned a walk through the woods, we were all eager to comply.The Hermitage is a National Trust of Scotland-protected site in Dunkeld, Perth and Kinross, Scotland. Officially it is known as The Hermitage Pleasure Ground and has several walks running through it. The most popular is the 1 km (0.75 mile) long walk to the Ossian's Hall of Mirrors. This was the walk that we were about to embark upon. We followed our kilted guide, Ross (on the right), into the forest. Rains still continued and adding to the fun of getting drenched was the water that dripped off the leaves of the tall trees surrounding us.Tall Douglas-firs formed most of the tree canopy overhead. These trees can reach a height of 200 ft at comparatively young ages and are, therefore, called the Young Giants. All around us, these trees rose from the ground and reached straight out to touch the sky. From our position on the ground, it seemed as if they were successful in their mission. Even though these trees weren't beenstalks, their tops seemed to end in the clouds, above which some magical world existed in parallel with our world. At this point, we wouldn't have been surprised if an elf had hopped out of the forest cover. Because of the ample moisture, moss covered most of the visible surfaces. The woods were fragrant with the smell of moisture and greenery. A trip into these forests makes one question why the human kind chose the concrete forest over this green forest. Such innocent beauty can never be found amidst the grey, dead walls bricks and cement.The bright orange foliage made its appearance every now and then as if to remind us that Autumn was almost upon us and very soon the rain would turn to snow and it would be too cold to venture into the wild.And finally, we chanced upon the Black Linn Falls where the mischievous, noisy river crashed upon the rocks it had smoothened over the centuries. Brown with the silt that it had cut out of its banks and beds, it gushed with anticipation towards the River Tay like a child that excitedly annouces to the entire world that it is on its way to visit its grandma.Here's a short video of the Black Linn Falls to give you a feel of the scene. Wish I could capture the scent of the scene and the feel of the gentle spray as well.Now we were approaching the Ossian's Hall of Mirrors. This little Hut once used to be an inspiration for writers and poets alike. It once used to house a room lined with mirrors all of which used to reflect the tumultous Black Linn Falls. The Hall was built to honour the blind bard Ossian who, as legends have it, wrote spectacular poetry in the 3rd Century. This is an internal door inside the Hall and the image painted on it is of the Bard Ossian. This door opens into a room that provides the view of the falls. What remains today is a toned down version of what used to a gaudy visitor attraction. And then we came to the end of our short walk. The rain still accompanied us and didn't show any signs of stopping. It looked as if we would be spending the next stop too getting drenched. But by now we had reconciled ourselves and had decided to make the most of our trip nevertheless. After all, one does not get the opportunity of visiting the remote parts of Scotland too easily. Watch out for the next part. It will follow soon...
And finally, we chanced upon the Black Linn Falls where the mischievous, noisy river crashed upon the rocks it had smoothened over the centuries. Brown with the silt that it had cut out of its banks and beds, it gushed with anticipation towards the River Tay like a child that excitedly annouces to the entire world that it is on its way to visit its grandma.

Here's a short video of the Black Linn Falls to give you a feel of the scene. Wish I could capture the scent of the scene and the feel of the gentle spray as well.

The Hermitage - A Green Maze Through the Craigvinean Forest, Douglas-fir trees, Dunkeld, Forestm River Braan, Ossian's Hall of Mirrors, The Hermitage, Young Giants, After starting from Dunkeld (read about my stay in Dunkeld here), we reached the parking space near the Hermitage in what seemed like five minutes. Upon deboarding the little bus, we realized that we were in a lush green forest with towering trees and, apparently, there was a river thundering through it somewhere nearby. When our guide mentioned a walk through the woods, we were all eager to comply.The Hermitage is a National Trust of Scotland-protected site in Dunkeld, Perth and Kinross, Scotland. Officially it is known as The Hermitage Pleasure Ground and has several walks running through it. The most popular is the 1 km (0.75 mile) long walk to the Ossian's Hall of Mirrors. This was the walk that we were about to embark upon. We followed our kilted guide, Ross (on the right), into the forest. Rains still continued and adding to the fun of getting drenched was the water that dripped off the leaves of the tall trees surrounding us.Tall Douglas-firs formed most of the tree canopy overhead. These trees can reach a height of 200 ft at comparatively young ages and are, therefore, called the Young Giants. All around us, these trees rose from the ground and reached straight out to touch the sky. From our position on the ground, it seemed as if they were successful in their mission. Even though these trees weren't beenstalks, their tops seemed to end in the clouds, above which some magical world existed in parallel with our world. At this point, we wouldn't have been surprised if an elf had hopped out of the forest cover. Because of the ample moisture, moss covered most of the visible surfaces. The woods were fragrant with the smell of moisture and greenery. A trip into these forests makes one question why the human kind chose the concrete forest over this green forest. Such innocent beauty can never be found amidst the grey, dead walls bricks and cement.The bright orange foliage made its appearance every now and then as if to remind us that Autumn was almost upon us and very soon the rain would turn to snow and it would be too cold to venture into the wild.And finally, we chanced upon the Black Linn Falls where the mischievous, noisy river crashed upon the rocks it had smoothened over the centuries. Brown with the silt that it had cut out of its banks and beds, it gushed with anticipation towards the River Tay like a child that excitedly annouces to the entire world that it is on its way to visit its grandma.Here's a short video of the Black Linn Falls to give you a feel of the scene. Wish I could capture the scent of the scene and the feel of the gentle spray as well.Now we were approaching the Ossian's Hall of Mirrors. This little Hut once used to be an inspiration for writers and poets alike. It once used to house a room lined with mirrors all of which used to reflect the tumultous Black Linn Falls. The Hall was built to honour the blind bard Ossian who, as legends have it, wrote spectacular poetry in the 3rd Century. This is an internal door inside the Hall and the image painted on it is of the Bard Ossian. This door opens into a room that provides the view of the falls. What remains today is a toned down version of what used to a gaudy visitor attraction. And then we came to the end of our short walk. The rain still accompanied us and didn't show any signs of stopping. It looked as if we would be spending the next stop too getting drenched. But by now we had reconciled ourselves and had decided to make the most of our trip nevertheless. After all, one does not get the opportunity of visiting the remote parts of Scotland too easily. Watch out for the next part. It will follow soon...
Now we were approaching the Ossian's Hall of Mirrors. This little Hut once used to be an inspiration for writers and poets alike. It once used to house a room lined with mirrors all of which used to reflect the tumultous Black Linn Falls. The Hall was built to honour the blind bard Ossian who, as legends have it, wrote spectacular poetry in the 3rd Century.
The Hermitage - A Green Maze Through the Craigvinean Forest, Douglas-fir trees, Dunkeld, Forestm River Braan, Ossian's Hall of Mirrors, The Hermitage, Young Giants, After starting from Dunkeld (read about my stay in Dunkeld here), we reached the parking space near the Hermitage in what seemed like five minutes. Upon deboarding the little bus, we realized that we were in a lush green forest with towering trees and, apparently, there was a river thundering through it somewhere nearby. When our guide mentioned a walk through the woods, we were all eager to comply.The Hermitage is a National Trust of Scotland-protected site in Dunkeld, Perth and Kinross, Scotland. Officially it is known as The Hermitage Pleasure Ground and has several walks running through it. The most popular is the 1 km (0.75 mile) long walk to the Ossian's Hall of Mirrors. This was the walk that we were about to embark upon. We followed our kilted guide, Ross (on the right), into the forest. Rains still continued and adding to the fun of getting drenched was the water that dripped off the leaves of the tall trees surrounding us.Tall Douglas-firs formed most of the tree canopy overhead. These trees can reach a height of 200 ft at comparatively young ages and are, therefore, called the Young Giants. All around us, these trees rose from the ground and reached straight out to touch the sky. From our position on the ground, it seemed as if they were successful in their mission. Even though these trees weren't beenstalks, their tops seemed to end in the clouds, above which some magical world existed in parallel with our world. At this point, we wouldn't have been surprised if an elf had hopped out of the forest cover. Because of the ample moisture, moss covered most of the visible surfaces. The woods were fragrant with the smell of moisture and greenery. A trip into these forests makes one question why the human kind chose the concrete forest over this green forest. Such innocent beauty can never be found amidst the grey, dead walls bricks and cement.The bright orange foliage made its appearance every now and then as if to remind us that Autumn was almost upon us and very soon the rain would turn to snow and it would be too cold to venture into the wild.And finally, we chanced upon the Black Linn Falls where the mischievous, noisy river crashed upon the rocks it had smoothened over the centuries. Brown with the silt that it had cut out of its banks and beds, it gushed with anticipation towards the River Tay like a child that excitedly annouces to the entire world that it is on its way to visit its grandma.Here's a short video of the Black Linn Falls to give you a feel of the scene. Wish I could capture the scent of the scene and the feel of the gentle spray as well.Now we were approaching the Ossian's Hall of Mirrors. This little Hut once used to be an inspiration for writers and poets alike. It once used to house a room lined with mirrors all of which used to reflect the tumultous Black Linn Falls. The Hall was built to honour the blind bard Ossian who, as legends have it, wrote spectacular poetry in the 3rd Century. This is an internal door inside the Hall and the image painted on it is of the Bard Ossian. This door opens into a room that provides the view of the falls. What remains today is a toned down version of what used to a gaudy visitor attraction. And then we came to the end of our short walk. The rain still accompanied us and didn't show any signs of stopping. It looked as if we would be spending the next stop too getting drenched. But by now we had reconciled ourselves and had decided to make the most of our trip nevertheless. After all, one does not get the opportunity of visiting the remote parts of Scotland too easily. Watch out for the next part. It will follow soon...
This is an internal door inside the Hall and the image painted on it is of the Bard Ossian. This door opens into a room that provides the view of the falls. What remains today is a toned down version of what used to a gaudy visitor attraction.

The Hermitage - A Green Maze Through the Craigvinean Forest, Douglas-fir trees, Dunkeld, Forestm River Braan, Ossian's Hall of Mirrors, The Hermitage, Young Giants, After starting from Dunkeld (read about my stay in Dunkeld here), we reached the parking space near the Hermitage in what seemed like five minutes. Upon deboarding the little bus, we realized that we were in a lush green forest with towering trees and, apparently, there was a river thundering through it somewhere nearby. When our guide mentioned a walk through the woods, we were all eager to comply.The Hermitage is a National Trust of Scotland-protected site in Dunkeld, Perth and Kinross, Scotland. Officially it is known as The Hermitage Pleasure Ground and has several walks running through it. The most popular is the 1 km (0.75 mile) long walk to the Ossian's Hall of Mirrors. This was the walk that we were about to embark upon. We followed our kilted guide, Ross (on the right), into the forest. Rains still continued and adding to the fun of getting drenched was the water that dripped off the leaves of the tall trees surrounding us.Tall Douglas-firs formed most of the tree canopy overhead. These trees can reach a height of 200 ft at comparatively young ages and are, therefore, called the Young Giants. All around us, these trees rose from the ground and reached straight out to touch the sky. From our position on the ground, it seemed as if they were successful in their mission. Even though these trees weren't beenstalks, their tops seemed to end in the clouds, above which some magical world existed in parallel with our world. At this point, we wouldn't have been surprised if an elf had hopped out of the forest cover. Because of the ample moisture, moss covered most of the visible surfaces. The woods were fragrant with the smell of moisture and greenery. A trip into these forests makes one question why the human kind chose the concrete forest over this green forest. Such innocent beauty can never be found amidst the grey, dead walls bricks and cement.The bright orange foliage made its appearance every now and then as if to remind us that Autumn was almost upon us and very soon the rain would turn to snow and it would be too cold to venture into the wild.And finally, we chanced upon the Black Linn Falls where the mischievous, noisy river crashed upon the rocks it had smoothened over the centuries. Brown with the silt that it had cut out of its banks and beds, it gushed with anticipation towards the River Tay like a child that excitedly annouces to the entire world that it is on its way to visit its grandma.Here's a short video of the Black Linn Falls to give you a feel of the scene. Wish I could capture the scent of the scene and the feel of the gentle spray as well.Now we were approaching the Ossian's Hall of Mirrors. This little Hut once used to be an inspiration for writers and poets alike. It once used to house a room lined with mirrors all of which used to reflect the tumultous Black Linn Falls. The Hall was built to honour the blind bard Ossian who, as legends have it, wrote spectacular poetry in the 3rd Century. This is an internal door inside the Hall and the image painted on it is of the Bard Ossian. This door opens into a room that provides the view of the falls. What remains today is a toned down version of what used to a gaudy visitor attraction. And then we came to the end of our short walk. The rain still accompanied us and didn't show any signs of stopping. It looked as if we would be spending the next stop too getting drenched. But by now we had reconciled ourselves and had decided to make the most of our trip nevertheless. After all, one does not get the opportunity of visiting the remote parts of Scotland too easily. Watch out for the next part. It will follow soon...
And then we came to the end of our short walk. The rain still accompanied us and didn't show any signs of stopping. It looked as if we would be spending the next stop too getting drenched. But by now we had reconciled ourselves and had decided to make the most of our trip nevertheless. After all, one does not get the opportunity of visiting the remote parts of Scotland too easily.

Watch out for the next part. It will follow soon...

4 comments:

Sangeeta Reghu Nair said...

Stunning pictures !! looks heavenly ..

Abhinav said...

Beautiful ! Liked the greener very much. And the waterfall is gorgeous !

Arnab Maity said...

The greens look inviting!

Vibha said...

@Sangeeta- Thanks :). It is indeed a beautiful place. Photographs don't do justice to it.

@Abhinav, Arnab - Yes, such is the charm of woods. Unfortunately we seem to have less and less of them with every passing day.

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