Few Photographs from my recent visit to Himachal before Baisakhi


 Here are few Photographs which give a view of farming land near Baisakhi time...

Baisakhi is an ancient harvest festival in the Punjab regions which also marks beginning of the second month on the solar calendar and new harvest season. Baisakhi is also a Sikh religious festival. Some of the areas(Kangra region) in Himachal actually belongs to Old Punjab...

Few Photographs from my recent visit to Himachal before Baisakhi: Baisakhi is an ancient harvest festival in the Punjab region which also marks beginning of the second month on the solar calendar and new harvest season. Baisakhi is also a Sikh religious festival.It falls on the first day of the Baisakh month in the solar Nanakshahi calendar which usually corresponds to April 13th in the Gregorian calendar. According to the Gregorian Calendar Baisakhi falls on April 13 every year and on April 14 once in 36 years. This variation in date is due to the fact that the date of Baisakhi is reckoned according to the Indian solar calendar and not the lunar calendar. This day is also observed as the beginning of the Hindu solar new year celebrated by the people of Nepal and India in Kerala, Orissa, West Bengal and some other regions of India. The particular significance attached to the occasion shows regional variation outside of Punjab too. In Himachal Pradesh, the Hindu Goddess Jwalamukhi is worshipped on Baisakhi, while in Bihar, the Sun-god Surya is honoured. The festival is celebrated as Rongali Bihu in Assam, Naba Barsha or Pohela Boishakh in Bengal, Assam and Tripura, as Bikhu or Bikhauti in the Kumaon region of Uttarakhand, Puthandu (Tamil New Year) in Tamil Nadu, Vishu (or Vaishakhi) in Kerala, Maha Vishuba Sankranti (or Pana Sankranti) in Orissa, and the Sinhala and Tamil new year festival in Sri Lanka. Besides Punjab, Baisakhi is widely celebrated as traditional harvest festival in many northern states of India, such as Haryana and Himachal Pradesh. In many places the day is marked by ritualistic bathing in sacred rivers like the Ganges.Wheat.:  VJ, ripple, Vijay Kumar Sharma, ripple4photography, Frozen Moments, photographs, Photography, ripple (VJ), VJ, Ripple (VJ) Photography, VJ-Photography, Capture Present for Future, Freeze Present for Future, ripple (VJ) Photographs , VJ Photographs, Ripple (VJ) Photography

Rabi Crops ready for harvesting... Note some green areas in this field... areas under shadow takes more time as compared to crops in open area...

Few Photographs from my recent visit to Himachal before Baisakhi: Baisakhi is an ancient harvest festival in the Punjab region which also marks beginning of the second month on the solar calendar and new harvest season. Baisakhi is also a Sikh religious festival.It falls on the first day of the Baisakh month in the solar Nanakshahi calendar which usually corresponds to April 13th in the Gregorian calendar. According to the Gregorian Calendar Baisakhi falls on April 13 every year and on April 14 once in 36 years. This variation in date is due to the fact that the date of Baisakhi is reckoned according to the Indian solar calendar and not the lunar calendar. This day is also observed as the beginning of the Hindu solar new year celebrated by the people of Nepal and India in Kerala, Orissa, West Bengal and some other regions of India. The particular significance attached to the occasion shows regional variation outside of Punjab too. In Himachal Pradesh, the Hindu Goddess Jwalamukhi is worshipped on Baisakhi, while in Bihar, the Sun-god Surya is honoured. The festival is celebrated as Rongali Bihu in Assam, Naba Barsha or Pohela Boishakh in Bengal, Assam and Tripura, as Bikhu or Bikhauti in the Kumaon region of Uttarakhand, Puthandu (Tamil New Year) in Tamil Nadu, Vishu (or Vaishakhi) in Kerala, Maha Vishuba Sankranti (or Pana Sankranti) in Orissa, and the Sinhala and Tamil new year festival in Sri Lanka. Besides Punjab, Baisakhi is widely celebrated as traditional harvest festival in many northern states of India, such as Haryana and Himachal Pradesh. In many places the day is marked by ritualistic bathing in sacred rivers like the Ganges.Wheat.:  VJ, ripple, Vijay Kumar Sharma, ripple4photography, Frozen Moments, photographs, Photography, ripple (VJ), VJ, Ripple (VJ) Photography, VJ-Photography, Capture Present for Future, Freeze Present for Future, ripple (VJ) Photographs , VJ Photographs, Ripple (VJ) Photography  
Wheat... 

Baisakhi is also observed as the beginning of the Hindu solar new year celebrated by the people of Nepal and India in Kerala, Orissa, West Bengal and some other regions of India. The particular significance attached to the occasion shows regional variation outside of Punjab too.

Few Photographs from my recent visit to Himachal before Baisakhi: Baisakhi is an ancient harvest festival in the Punjab region which also marks beginning of the second month on the solar calendar and new harvest season. Baisakhi is also a Sikh religious festival.It falls on the first day of the Baisakh month in the solar Nanakshahi calendar which usually corresponds to April 13th in the Gregorian calendar. According to the Gregorian Calendar Baisakhi falls on April 13 every year and on April 14 once in 36 years. This variation in date is due to the fact that the date of Baisakhi is reckoned according to the Indian solar calendar and not the lunar calendar. This day is also observed as the beginning of the Hindu solar new year celebrated by the people of Nepal and India in Kerala, Orissa, West Bengal and some other regions of India. The particular significance attached to the occasion shows regional variation outside of Punjab too. In Himachal Pradesh, the Hindu Goddess Jwalamukhi is worshipped on Baisakhi, while in Bihar, the Sun-god Surya is honoured. The festival is celebrated as Rongali Bihu in Assam, Naba Barsha or Pohela Boishakh in Bengal, Assam and Tripura, as Bikhu or Bikhauti in the Kumaon region of Uttarakhand, Puthandu (Tamil New Year) in Tamil Nadu, Vishu (or Vaishakhi) in Kerala, Maha Vishuba Sankranti (or Pana Sankranti) in Orissa, and the Sinhala and Tamil new year festival in Sri Lanka. Besides Punjab, Baisakhi is widely celebrated as traditional harvest festival in many northern states of India, such as Haryana and Himachal Pradesh. In many places the day is marked by ritualistic bathing in sacred rivers like the Ganges.Wheat.:  VJ, ripple, Vijay Kumar Sharma, ripple4photography, Frozen Moments, photographs, Photography, ripple (VJ), VJ, Ripple (VJ) Photography, VJ-Photography, Capture Present for Future, Freeze Present for Future, ripple (VJ) Photographs , VJ Photographs, Ripple (VJ) Photography  

In Himachal Pradesh, the Hindu Goddess Jwalamukhi is worshipped on Baisakhi, while in Bihar, the Sun-god Surya is honoured.

Few Photographs from my recent visit to Himachal before Baisakhi: Baisakhi is an ancient harvest festival in the Punjab region which also marks beginning of the second month on the solar calendar and new harvest season. Baisakhi is also a Sikh religious festival.It falls on the first day of the Baisakh month in the solar Nanakshahi calendar which usually corresponds to April 13th in the Gregorian calendar. According to the Gregorian Calendar Baisakhi falls on April 13 every year and on April 14 once in 36 years. This variation in date is due to the fact that the date of Baisakhi is reckoned according to the Indian solar calendar and not the lunar calendar. This day is also observed as the beginning of the Hindu solar new year celebrated by the people of Nepal and India in Kerala, Orissa, West Bengal and some other regions of India. The particular significance attached to the occasion shows regional variation outside of Punjab too. In Himachal Pradesh, the Hindu Goddess Jwalamukhi is worshipped on Baisakhi, while in Bihar, the Sun-god Surya is honoured. The festival is celebrated as Rongali Bihu in Assam, Naba Barsha or Pohela Boishakh in Bengal, Assam and Tripura, as Bikhu or Bikhauti in the Kumaon region of Uttarakhand, Puthandu (Tamil New Year) in Tamil Nadu, Vishu (or Vaishakhi) in Kerala, Maha Vishuba Sankranti (or Pana Sankranti) in Orissa, and the Sinhala and Tamil new year festival in Sri Lanka. Besides Punjab, Baisakhi is widely celebrated as traditional harvest festival in many northern states of India, such as Haryana and Himachal Pradesh. In many places the day is marked by ritualistic bathing in sacred rivers like the Ganges.Wheat.:  VJ, ripple, Vijay Kumar Sharma, ripple4photography, Frozen Moments, photographs, Photography, ripple (VJ), VJ, Ripple (VJ) Photography, VJ-Photography, Capture Present for Future, Freeze Present for Future, ripple (VJ) Photographs , VJ Photographs, Ripple (VJ) Photography  

  The festival is celebrated as Rongali Bihu in Assam, Naba Barsha or Pohela Boishakh in Bengal, Assam and Tripura, as Bikhu or Bikhauti in the Kumaon region of Uttarakhand, Puthandu (Tamil New Year) in Tamil Nadu, Vishu (or Vaishakhi) in Kerala, Maha Vishuba Sankranti (or Pana Sankranti) in Orissa, and the Sinhala and Tamil new year festival in Sri Lanka.

Few Photographs from my recent visit to Himachal before Baisakhi: Baisakhi is an ancient harvest festival in the Punjab region which also marks beginning of the second month on the solar calendar and new harvest season. Baisakhi is also a Sikh religious festival.It falls on the first day of the Baisakh month in the solar Nanakshahi calendar which usually corresponds to April 13th in the Gregorian calendar. According to the Gregorian Calendar Baisakhi falls on April 13 every year and on April 14 once in 36 years. This variation in date is due to the fact that the date of Baisakhi is reckoned according to the Indian solar calendar and not the lunar calendar. This day is also observed as the beginning of the Hindu solar new year celebrated by the people of Nepal and India in Kerala, Orissa, West Bengal and some other regions of India. The particular significance attached to the occasion shows regional variation outside of Punjab too. In Himachal Pradesh, the Hindu Goddess Jwalamukhi is worshipped on Baisakhi, while in Bihar, the Sun-god Surya is honoured. The festival is celebrated as Rongali Bihu in Assam, Naba Barsha or Pohela Boishakh in Bengal, Assam and Tripura, as Bikhu or Bikhauti in the Kumaon region of Uttarakhand, Puthandu (Tamil New Year) in Tamil Nadu, Vishu (or Vaishakhi) in Kerala, Maha Vishuba Sankranti (or Pana Sankranti) in Orissa, and the Sinhala and Tamil new year festival in Sri Lanka. Besides Punjab, Baisakhi is widely celebrated as traditional harvest festival in many northern states of India, such as Haryana and Himachal Pradesh. In many places the day is marked by ritualistic bathing in sacred rivers like the Ganges.Wheat.:  VJ, ripple, Vijay Kumar Sharma, ripple4photography, Frozen Moments, photographs, Photography, ripple (VJ), VJ, Ripple (VJ) Photography, VJ-Photography, Capture Present for Future, Freeze Present for Future, ripple (VJ) Photographs , VJ Photographs, Ripple (VJ) Photography  
Besides Punjab, Baisakhi is widely celebrated as traditional harvest festival in many northern states of India, such as Haryana and Himachal Pradesh. In many places the day is marked by ritualistic bathing in sacred rivers like the Ganges.

Few Photographs from my recent visit to Himachal before Baisakhi: Baisakhi is an ancient harvest festival in the Punjab region which also marks beginning of the second month on the solar calendar and new harvest season. Baisakhi is also a Sikh religious festival.It falls on the first day of the Baisakh month in the solar Nanakshahi calendar which usually corresponds to April 13th in the Gregorian calendar. According to the Gregorian Calendar Baisakhi falls on April 13 every year and on April 14 once in 36 years. This variation in date is due to the fact that the date of Baisakhi is reckoned according to the Indian solar calendar and not the lunar calendar. This day is also observed as the beginning of the Hindu solar new year celebrated by the people of Nepal and India in Kerala, Orissa, West Bengal and some other regions of India. The particular significance attached to the occasion shows regional variation outside of Punjab too. In Himachal Pradesh, the Hindu Goddess Jwalamukhi is worshipped on Baisakhi, while in Bihar, the Sun-god Surya is honoured. The festival is celebrated as Rongali Bihu in Assam, Naba Barsha or Pohela Boishakh in Bengal, Assam and Tripura, as Bikhu or Bikhauti in the Kumaon region of Uttarakhand, Puthandu (Tamil New Year) in Tamil Nadu, Vishu (or Vaishakhi) in Kerala, Maha Vishuba Sankranti (or Pana Sankranti) in Orissa, and the Sinhala and Tamil new year festival in Sri Lanka. Besides Punjab, Baisakhi is widely celebrated as traditional harvest festival in many northern states of India, such as Haryana and Himachal Pradesh. In many places the day is marked by ritualistic bathing in sacred rivers like the Ganges.Wheat.:  VJ, ripple, Vijay Kumar Sharma, ripple4photography, Frozen Moments, photographs, Photography, ripple (VJ), VJ, Ripple (VJ) Photography, VJ-Photography, Capture Present for Future, Freeze Present for Future, ripple (VJ) Photographs , VJ Photographs, Ripple (VJ) Photography  

Wheat grain is a staple food used to make flour for leavened, flat and steamed breads, biscuits, cookies, cakes, breakfast cereal, pasta, noodles, couscous and for fermentation to make BEER...

Few Photographs from my recent visit to Himachal before Baisakhi: Baisakhi is an ancient harvest festival in the Punjab region which also marks beginning of the second month on the solar calendar and new harvest season. Baisakhi is also a Sikh religious festival.It falls on the first day of the Baisakh month in the solar Nanakshahi calendar which usually corresponds to April 13th in the Gregorian calendar. According to the Gregorian Calendar Baisakhi falls on April 13 every year and on April 14 once in 36 years. This variation in date is due to the fact that the date of Baisakhi is reckoned according to the Indian solar calendar and not the lunar calendar. This day is also observed as the beginning of the Hindu solar new year celebrated by the people of Nepal and India in Kerala, Orissa, West Bengal and some other regions of India. The particular significance attached to the occasion shows regional variation outside of Punjab too. In Himachal Pradesh, the Hindu Goddess Jwalamukhi is worshipped on Baisakhi, while in Bihar, the Sun-god Surya is honoured. The festival is celebrated as Rongali Bihu in Assam, Naba Barsha or Pohela Boishakh in Bengal, Assam and Tripura, as Bikhu or Bikhauti in the Kumaon region of Uttarakhand, Puthandu (Tamil New Year) in Tamil Nadu, Vishu (or Vaishakhi) in Kerala, Maha Vishuba Sankranti (or Pana Sankranti) in Orissa, and the Sinhala and Tamil new year festival in Sri Lanka. Besides Punjab, Baisakhi is widely celebrated as traditional harvest festival in many northern states of India, such as Haryana and Himachal Pradesh. In many places the day is marked by ritualistic bathing in sacred rivers like the Ganges.Wheat.:  VJ, ripple, Vijay Kumar Sharma, ripple4photography, Frozen Moments, photographs, Photography, ripple (VJ), VJ, Ripple (VJ) Photography, VJ-Photography, Capture Present for Future, Freeze Present for Future, ripple (VJ) Photographs , VJ Photographs, Ripple (VJ) Photography  

Wheat is planted to a limited extent as a forage crop for livestock, and its straw can be used as a construction material for roofing thatch

Few Photographs from my recent visit to Himachal before Baisakhi: Baisakhi is an ancient harvest festival in the Punjab region which also marks beginning of the second month on the solar calendar and new harvest season. Baisakhi is also a Sikh religious festival.It falls on the first day of the Baisakh month in the solar Nanakshahi calendar which usually corresponds to April 13th in the Gregorian calendar. According to the Gregorian Calendar Baisakhi falls on April 13 every year and on April 14 once in 36 years. This variation in date is due to the fact that the date of Baisakhi is reckoned according to the Indian solar calendar and not the lunar calendar. This day is also observed as the beginning of the Hindu solar new year celebrated by the people of Nepal and India in Kerala, Orissa, West Bengal and some other regions of India. The particular significance attached to the occasion shows regional variation outside of Punjab too. In Himachal Pradesh, the Hindu Goddess Jwalamukhi is worshipped on Baisakhi, while in Bihar, the Sun-god Surya is honoured. The festival is celebrated as Rongali Bihu in Assam, Naba Barsha or Pohela Boishakh in Bengal, Assam and Tripura, as Bikhu or Bikhauti in the Kumaon region of Uttarakhand, Puthandu (Tamil New Year) in Tamil Nadu, Vishu (or Vaishakhi) in Kerala, Maha Vishuba Sankranti (or Pana Sankranti) in Orissa, and the Sinhala and Tamil new year festival in Sri Lanka. Besides Punjab, Baisakhi is widely celebrated as traditional harvest festival in many northern states of India, such as Haryana and Himachal Pradesh. In many places the day is marked by ritualistic bathing in sacred rivers like the Ganges.Wheat.:  VJ, ripple, Vijay Kumar Sharma, ripple4photography, Frozen Moments, photographs, Photography, ripple (VJ), VJ, Ripple (VJ) Photography, VJ-Photography, Capture Present for Future, Freeze Present for Future, ripple (VJ) Photographs , VJ Photographs, Ripple (VJ) Photography  
Hybrid wheat grass which is easy to harvest...

According to the Gregorian Calendar Baisakhi falls on April 13 every year and on April 14 once in 36 years. This variation in date is due to the fact that the date of Baisakhi is reckoned according to the Indian solar calendar and not the lunar calendar.

Few Photographs from my recent visit to Himachal before Baisakhi: Baisakhi is an ancient harvest festival in the Punjab region which also marks beginning of the second month on the solar calendar and new harvest season. Baisakhi is also a Sikh religious festival.It falls on the first day of the Baisakh month in the solar Nanakshahi calendar which usually corresponds to April 13th in the Gregorian calendar. According to the Gregorian Calendar Baisakhi falls on April 13 every year and on April 14 once in 36 years. This variation in date is due to the fact that the date of Baisakhi is reckoned according to the Indian solar calendar and not the lunar calendar. This day is also observed as the beginning of the Hindu solar new year celebrated by the people of Nepal and India in Kerala, Orissa, West Bengal and some other regions of India. The particular significance attached to the occasion shows regional variation outside of Punjab too. In Himachal Pradesh, the Hindu Goddess Jwalamukhi is worshipped on Baisakhi, while in Bihar, the Sun-god Surya is honoured. The festival is celebrated as Rongali Bihu in Assam, Naba Barsha or Pohela Boishakh in Bengal, Assam and Tripura, as Bikhu or Bikhauti in the Kumaon region of Uttarakhand, Puthandu (Tamil New Year) in Tamil Nadu, Vishu (or Vaishakhi) in Kerala, Maha Vishuba Sankranti (or Pana Sankranti) in Orissa, and the Sinhala and Tamil new year festival in Sri Lanka. Besides Punjab, Baisakhi is widely celebrated as traditional harvest festival in many northern states of India, such as Haryana and Himachal Pradesh. In many places the day is marked by ritualistic bathing in sacred rivers like the Ganges.Wheat.:  VJ, ripple, Vijay Kumar Sharma, ripple4photography, Frozen Moments, photographs, Photography, ripple (VJ), VJ, Ripple (VJ) Photography, VJ-Photography, Capture Present for Future, Freeze Present for Future, ripple (VJ) Photographs , VJ Photographs, Ripple (VJ) Photography  
Normal wheat grass, which is difficult to harvest and painful for framer to deal with it...

1 comment:

Sujatha said...

Baisakhi is celebrated as 'Vishu' in Kerala when the new dawn is welcomed with "Kani" (auspicious sight of cassia flowers (kanikonna), fresh cucumber, mango, other fruits and grains, gold ornaments etc arranged in front of the idol of Lord Krishna). On vishu day has to see kani first.Youngsters of the family are given kaineetam (Pocket money) on this day by elders. So nice isn't it. So when you grow up you have to give as well to the naughty cutes.

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